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Recovery Projects

CWTD-translocation-USFWS.jpg

Since 2006, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Oregon has put an average of over 20% of its budget towards on-the-ground recovery projects benefitting listed species.   Here are just a sample of those projects funded in 2015.

  • Reintroduction of Fenders blue butterfly

    Fenders blue butterfly larvae on a lupine host plant.

    Fender’s blue butterfly was recently reintroduced to the William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge in Corvallis, Oregon.  In spring of 2014, larvae were collected from a nearby healthy population and placed on lupine host plants at the refuge.  Butterflies hatched in spring 2015 and initial results are very encouraging because many butterflies were observed in spring. Adult butterflies also were released on the refuge this spring and they have been observed doing what healthy butterflies do – basking in the sunlight, moving between patches of habitat, and reproducing!      

  • Sierra Nevada Red Fox

    Trail camera photo of Sierra Nevada red fox

    Last year recovery money supported buying trail cameras to put out on the Umpqua, Willamette and Deschutes National Forests to detect the presence of Sierra Nevada Red Fox.  This fox is a candidate species under the Endangered Species Act.  Detecting the presence of this species in our national forests will help us determine its status.      

  • Outdoor School

    Photo of students in stream (Photo USFWS)

    Every year since 1995, the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Office has funded two outdoor school programs to provide support in developing and sustaining its natural resource based, hands-on programs that directly connect children with nature in an outdoor environment.  

    Thanks to Oregon Outdoor Schools, students have the ability to develops environmental literacy and responsible citizenship and gain appreciation for the natural world.  Outdoor school makes a lasting impression on our students!

     

  • Oregon Silverspot Butterfly

    Fenders blue butterfly larvae on a lupine host plant.

    Funding for recovery of the butterfly over the last decade has been used for native seed production, habitat restoration, a captive-rearing program with two zoos, butterfly releases, population surveys, and genetic research.  Multiple partners provided additional funding and in-kind services. 

    The butterfly also has a sponsor, the Pelican Pub, which produces Silverspot Pale Ale, with a percentage of the proceeds going to the butterfly captive-rearing efforts!! 

     

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