Conservation Science
Northeast Region

News archive

 


White House recognizes U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service scientist as 'Climate Change Champion'
September 8, 2016 - Dr. Richard Bennett, regional scientist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Northeast Region based in Hadley, Mass., has been named 2016 GreenGov Presidential Awards Climate Champion for his leadership in Hurricane Sandy recovery. Following the devastation left by the storm in 2012, Bennett led the Department of the Interior response team, overseeing $167 million in FWS project funding to help revitalize the Northeast and to protect it from future storms and sea-level rise. Bennett worked to launch more than 100 sustainability-focused projects, and led a team that developed performance metrics for climate resilience that are changing the way the federal government prepares for severe weather events.

News release


Science Partners Launch “Ecosystem Benefits and Risks” Website
May 25, 2016 - The Appalachian Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) and the U.S. Forest Service are releasing products from the first phase of an ongoing study assessing benefits of and risks to the region’s “ecosystem services” — natural assets valued by people, such as clean drinking water, outdoor recreation, forest products, and biological conservation.

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Plovers in paradise
March 10, 2016 - This winter, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Migratory Birds Division participated in the first ever comprehensive piping plover and shorebird census on the Turks and Caicos Islands, an island group located in the northern Caribbean just east of the Bahamas and Cuba.

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Status and Trends of Wetlands in the Long Island Sound Area: 130 Year Assessment
January 20, 2016 - This report provides the first 130 year assessment of tidal wetland change for the entire Long Island Sound area. The results indicate an overall 31 percent loss of tidal wetlands with a 27 percent loss in Connecticut and 48 percent loss in New York.

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Appalachian LCC part of Premiere Climate Education and Literacy Training Program
August 19, 2015 - The inaugural Educator Climate and Conservation Colloquium (or EC3) brought together 50 teachers and school decision makers from across the nation to receive training on campus sustainability and wildlife conservation issues to better serve schools and communities.

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Shorebird science? There's an app for that!
May 4, 2015 - The latest tool designed to help manage the threatened piping plover is only a download away; "iPlover" is the first smartphone data collection application developed by the U.S. Geological Survey and will help those managing plover populations.

 

Funding for iPlover was provided through the Department of the Interior's North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative as part of its Hurricane Sandy response. The app was developed by the USGS' Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center and the Center for Integrated Data Analytics. North Atlantic LCC Coordinator Andrew Milliken said the USGS worked with staff from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, state agencies and non-governmental organizations to incorporate specific data collection needs and enable important stakeholders and partners to contribute data from hundreds of field observations within the plover's U.S. Atlantic coastal breeding range.

 

"The information collected will not only greatly improve our understanding of impacts from sea level rise, storms and beach management on piping plovers but also how managing for plovers can benefit other beach-dependent species, such as the American oystercatcher," Milliken said.

News release


Assessing potential energy development across the Appalachians
A new study and online mapping tool released March 5 by the Appalachian Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) and The Nature Conservancy are intended to inform discussions among conservation agencies and organizations, industry, policy makers, regulators and the public on how to protect essential natural resources while realizing the benefits of increased domestic energy production.

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Conserving imperiled aquatic species in the Upper Tennessee River Basin
A team of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service scientists, with assistance from U.S. Geological Survey, have developed a collaborative conservation strategy examining cost-effective approaches for efforts to conserve and manage 36 imperiled freshwater fish and mussel species in the 22,360 square-mile Upper Tennessee River Basin. The strategy identifies aquatic species conservation objectives and recommends a management approach for conserving and recovering prioritized species and locations across the basin. It is designed to help the Service better integrate its efforts internally and with those of partners in North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia, whose missions complement the goal of maximizing conservation and recovery of imperiled aquatic species and the ecosystems upon which they depend.

View the strategy (PDF)


Refuge Division of Natural Resources March 2015 Project Updates
The Northeast Region Refuges' Division of Natural Resources provides technical support, expertise and advice to staff and collaborates with partners to accomplish the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service mission. Our goal is to use sound science that informs effective and efficient management decisions and identifies our most important resource and conservation contributions at local, regional and landscape scales. The Division also participates in and supports the Inventory & Monitoring Initiative, which works with others to assess the status of national wildlife refuge lands, waters, and biota, and supports conservation objectives at multiple spatial scales.

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Science to weather the storm
How will severe storms and sea level rise predicted with a changing climate impact streams, beaches and tidal marshes in the Northeast? The North Atlantic LCC is helping partner organizations understand and prepare for future threats to vulnerable systems through three projects supported by federal funding for Hurricane Sandy recovery.

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Restoring streams in Maryland with a low cost and low impact solution
October 14, 2014: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is helping to lead a collaborative effort to protect and restore wildlife and natural resources the South River Greenway -- one of the last remaining intact forest tracts and stream valley wetlands in Anne Arundel County, MD., located between Baltimore and Washington D.C.

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Partners connect to conserve the Connecticut
Armed with maps and models that analyze current and future needs of regional species and ecosystems, federal, state and NGO partners are working together to create a conservation blueprint for the Connecticut River watershed. This pilot landscape conservation design effort uses a strategic habitat conservation approach to set population objectives for 14 identified surrogate species representing the habitat needs of many other species within the watershed.

Click here for an update on progress and key next steps.



Last updated: September 8, 2016