Conserving the Nature of America
Announcement
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Selects Greg Hughes as New State Supervisor for Idaho Ecological Services Field Office

July 15, 2016

Contact:

Division of Public Affairs
External Affairs
Telephone: 703-358-2220
Website: https://www.fws.gov/external-affairs/public-affairs/


Greg Hughes Credit: USFWS

BOISE, Idaho – Longtime natural resource professional Greg Hughes has been named State Supervisor for the Idaho Fish and Wildlife Office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service). Hughes succeeds Mike Carrier, who retired from federal service in 2015.

Hughes is currently the Regional Chief for Migratory Birds in the Service’s Southwest Region. Hughes has been with the Service for 29 years, including positions in Fish and Aquatic Conservation, Ecological Services and within the National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) system across the country. Hughes will be returning to the Pacific Northwest, where he served as Project Leader for the Mid-Columbia River NWR Complex in Washington from 2000-2011 and Deputy Project Leader at the Western Oregon NWR Complex from 1998 to 2000.

“The Service, our partners and the public will benefit from Greg’s proven leadership skills and cooperative approach to conservation,” said Robyn Thorson, Pacific Region Director. “What really stands out about Greg is his experience in partnering and collaboration. He develops partnerships in the early stages of projects.”

Hughes will assume his new duties in late August 2016. Based in Boise, his 64-person staff manages complex natural resource issues throughout Idaho. The Idaho Fish and Wildlife Office’s core responsibilities include species conservation and recovery, private lands and conservation partnerships, listing and classification of endangered species, federal agency assistance and consultation, and the assessment of contaminants on natural resources.

Hughes will provide leadership in all facets of the Service’s wildlife conservation responsibilities, including important partnerships with Native American tribes, state agencies, other federal agencies, non-governmental organizations, and landowners.

“I am excited about returning to the Pacific Northwest,” Hughes said. “The opportunity to contribute to the Service's important work in Idaho will, without doubt, be rewarding and challenging. I look forward to being part of a great team and helping to continue building strong collaborative partnerships with state and federal agencies, tribes, partners and the public to address the conservation challenges and opportunities facing Idaho.”

Hughes received a B.S. in Zoology with a minor in Fisheries Management from Colorado State University. He plans to live in Boise with his wife, Michelle. His two sons, Levi and Colter, already live in the Pacific Northwest with many other family members living in the Boise area.

“For the first time in my career our immediate families are all now located in the Pacific Northwest, and we are excited about coming home to co-workers, family and friends,” Hughes said.

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The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

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