Conserving the Nature of America
Bulletin
SERVICE SEEKING INFORMATION ON SALAMANDERS MISSING FROM THE SAN MARCOS NATIONAL FISH HATCHERY AND TECHNOLOGY CENTER

January 24, 2017

Contact(s):

Lesli Gray, 972-439-4542
lesli_gray@fws.gov 


San Marcos Salamander.Crredit USFWS.

San Marcos Salamander Credit: USFWS.

San Marcos, TX - On November 25, 2016, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Office of Law Enforcement in San Antonio was made aware that 253 Texas Blind Salamanders (Eurycea nana) and 110 San Marcos Salamanders (Eurycea rathbuni) were missing from the San Marcos National Fish Hatchery and Technology Center located at 500 North McCarthy, San Marcos, TX. Texas Blind and San Marcos salamanders are both protected under the Endangered Species Act and Texas state law.

The Service is seeking information regarding the missing salamanders and offering a reward in the amount of $10,000 for information related to this case. The reward will be issued if the missing salamanders are determined to be a criminal act and the information provided leads to the criminal conviction of the person(s) responsible. Anyone with information about the missing salamanders is urged to come forward. Information can be provided to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s San Antonio Office of Law Enforcement at (210) 681-8419 or Operation Game Thief at 1-800-792-GAME (4263). Callers may remain anonymous.

The Texas blind salamander is a rare cave-dwelling troglobite amphibian native to San Marcos, Texas, specifically the San Marcos Pool of the Edwards Aquifer. The salamander is approximately 5 inches long and has blood-red external gills for absorbing oxygen from the water. Its diet varies by what flows into its cave and includes blind shrimp, snails, and amphipods. The Texas blind salamander was listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act on March 11, 1967. The San Marcos salamander is a small species of aquatic, lungless salamander native to the United States, endemic to Spring Lake and a small region of the headwaters of the San Marcos River near Aquarena Springs, in Hays County, Texas. It is one to two inches long, with a slender body and external gills, and is reddish-brown in color. The San Marcos salamander was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act on July 14, 1980.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service works with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov/. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel and download photos from our Flickr page. http://www.fws.gov/southwest/


The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov/. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel and download photos from our Flickr page.