Conserving the Nature of America
Bulletin
Red-Crowned Parrot Populations Improving
Service Determines Endangered Species Act Protection Not Warranted At This Time

April 3, 2019

Contact(s):

Lesli Gray, (972) 439-4542, lesli_gray@fws.gov


Red-crowned parrot. Credit: © Julio Mulero, Flickr, Creative Commons.

Red-crowned parrot. Credit: © Julio Mulero, Flickr, Creative Commons.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that the red-crowned parrot does not warrant protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Today’s decision, known as a 12-month finding, follows an in-depth review under the ESA. After examining the best scientific and commercial information available, including a recently completed species status assessment (SSA), the Service determined the red-crowned parrot is not in danger of extinction (endangered) or likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future (threatened).

The SSA found primary stressors for red-crowned parrots have been loss of habitat and the illegal pet trade. From 1982-2008, laws passed in Mexico banning the collection and export of parrots reduced the collection of parrots for the pet trade. In addition, logging has declined during the past three decades, and forest regeneration has occurred in some areas that had been clear-cut. Red-crowned parrots have also expanded into ranchland habitats in Mexico and in urban habitats in Mexico and south Texas, and in these areas, resources for nesting and foraging have allowed for stable or increasing population sizes.

The red-crowned parrot is a medium-sized (13 inches), bright green parrot with a red crown, yellowgreen cheeks and blue bands extending from the crown down the neck. The species is native to forests in northeastern Mexico. However, the range has expanded within the past several decades into ranchlands and urban areas in and adjacent to its historical range in Mexico and into cities in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of south Texas.

Red-crowned parrots are cavity nesters, using pre-existing cavities in a variety of native tree species in Mexico. In south Texas, they primarily use ornamental palms in residential areas. The species eats a variety of nuts, berries, seeds, fruits and flowers, using mainly native plants in forests and ranchlands in Mexico and cultivated nut and fruit trees and ornamental plants in south Texas.

Additional information on the red-crowned parrot and the finding is available at the Service’s Texas Coastal Ecological Services Field Office web site, https://www.fws.gov/southwest/es/TexasCoastal/.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service works with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov/. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel and download photos from our Flickr page. http://www.fws.gov/southwest/


The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov/. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel and download photos from our Flickr page.