Conserving the Nature of America
Press Release
Fourteen species of springsnails in Nevada and Utah found to be stable, don’t require Endangered Species Act protection

October 4, 2017

Contact(s):

Contact: Dan Balduini (702) 515-5480, daniel_balduini@fws.gov



LAS VEGAS — Following a thorough review of the best available science, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that 14 species of springsnails in Nevada and Utah, all have stable populations and distributions, and do not require protection under the Endangered Species Act.

Springsnails are small aquatic mollusks found in fresh or brackish water, and in moist soil near springs. Most are no larger than a BB pellet. The 14 species reviewed by the Service are unique to freshwater springs in the Great Basin and Mojave Desert.

In conducting this review, the Service solicited information from state and federal agencies, Native American tribes and the scientific community. The Service’s review indicated the current numbers and distribution of the 14 species are similar to their historical levels and that current and future stressors do not pose significant threats to their survival. The review also looked at the springsnails’ habitat, potential overutilization, disease and predation, adequacy of existing protections, and other natural or man-made factors.

The species covered in the not-warranted determination (known as a 12-month finding) were included in a petition from the Center for Biological Diversity, the Freshwater Mollusk Conservation Society and several individuals.

This finding and supporting documents are available online at www.regulations.gov  (Docket Number FWS-R8-ES-2011-0001), or at www.fws.gov/nevada/. Supporting documents used in preparing this finding are also available for inspection by appointment, during normal business hours at the Southern Nevada Fish and Wildlife Office in Las Vegas at 4701 North Torrey Pines Drive, telephone 702/515-5230, facsimile 702/515-5231.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service works with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. For more information about our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov/cno/ or connect with us via Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Flickr.

 

                                                                                              -FWS-


The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov/. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel and download photos from our Flickr page.