Conserving the Nature of America
Press Release
Eagle Shootings under Investigation in New Mexico
Reward offered for information

March 22, 2018

Contact(s):

Phillip Land, 505/248-7889, phillip_land@fws.gov
Aislinn Maestas, 505/248-6599, aislinn_maestas@fws.gov


The injured male golden eagle will spend the rest of its life in captivity. Credit: USFWS.

The injured male golden eagle will spend the rest of its life in captivity. Credit: USFWS

NEW MEXICO - The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is investigating the shootings of a bald eagle and a golden eagle found at the Navajo Agricultural Products Industry (NAPI) in the Navajo Nation.

The bald eagle was found shot with no tail feathers on March 13, 2018 in area seven of NAPI. The bald eagle later died due to its injuries. The Service’s Wildlife Forensics Laboratory will conduct a necropsy to verify the cause of death.

On March 21, 2018, an adult male golden eagle (see image) was found shot with no tail feathers in area one of NAPI.  One of the golden eagle’s wings was amputated at the wrist. The bird is currently recovering but will not be released back into the wild on account of its injuries.

Anyone with information regarding the shootings of these eagles is asked to contact the Service’s Office of Law Enforcement in Albuquerque, New Mexico (505-346-7828), or the Navajo Nation Department of Fish & Wildlife/ Navajo Nation’s Operation Game Thief (928-221-9114).  Callers with information may remain anonymous. The Service is offering a $3,000 reward for information leading to the conviction of the person or persons responsible for the shootings of these eagles.

Bald eagles were removed from Endangered Species Act protection in June 2007 after being declared recovered, due in part to habitat protection and protection from human-caused disturbance. Bald eagles and golden eagles remain protected by the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Taking, shooting, injuring or killing an eagle are violations of these acts. The maximum penalty for a criminal violation of the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act is one year in jail and $100,000 per individual or $200,000 per organization for the first offense. The Migratory Bird Treaty Act carries maximum penalties ranging from six months to one year in jail and fines of up to $250,000 per individual, depending on whether an individual is convicted of a misdemeanor or a felony.

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service.

For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov. Connect with our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/usfws, follow our tweets at www.twitter.com/usfwshq, watch our YouTube Channel at http://www.youtube.com/usfws and download photos from our Flickr page at http://www.flickr.com/photos/usfwshq.


The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov/. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel and download photos from our Flickr page.