Conserving the Nature of America
Press Release
American Electric Power American Burying Beetle Habitat Conservation Plan
Three-state plan will benefit the American burying beetle while enabling American Electric Power to manage electrical facilities

October 18, 2018

Contact(s):

Lesli Gray, (972) 439-4542, lesli_gray@fws.gov


American burying beetle. © Jay Pruitt.

American burying beetle. Credit: © Jay Pruitt.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is publishing the final Environmental Impact Statement for the American Electric Power (AEP) Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) and Incidental Take Permit (ITP). The HCP covers impacts to the American burying beetle (ABB) that may result from AEP
maintaining, operating and expanding its electrical facilities in Oklahoma, Arkansas and Texas.

FWS is publishing the final Environmental Impact Statement (fEIS) evaluating the direct, indirect and cumulative effects of issuing the ITP, supported by implementing the HCP. The HCP describes the conservation measures they will take to address the potential impact of their activities. The covered
activities may impact up to 6,713 acres of occupied ABB habitat over the ITP’s life. The HCP and ITP will be in effect for 30 years. The ROD and ITP issuance will occur no sooner than 30 days after publishing this notice of availability.

The ABB is a large, shiny, black beetle with hardened protective wing covers marked by two scalloped-shaped orange patterns. The nocturnal beetle is active only in the summer and lives for only one year. They are scavengers that depend on carrion throughout their lifecycle. The beetle buries a
small carcass, lays eggs beside the carcass, and the larvae feed from that carcass until they mature.

HCPs are one of many tools under the Endangered Species Act that provide businesses, landowners and state and local governments the ability to continue their activities while ensuring they protect listed species like the ABB. Read additional information on HCPs and other ESA tools .

America’s fish, wildlife and plant resources belong to us all, and ensuring imperiled species’ health is a shared responsibility. The FWS works actively to engage conservation partners and the public in the search for improved and innovative ways to conserve and recover imperiled species.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service works with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the American people’s continuing benefit. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit https://www.fws.gov/. Connect with our Facebook page,
follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel and download photos from our Flickr page.


The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov/. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel and download photos from our Flickr page.