Conserving the Nature of America
Press Release
Fish and Wildlife Service Conducts Five-Year Status Reviews of 27 Southeastern Species

September 22, 2014

Contact:

Division of Public Affairs
External Affairs
Telephone: 703-358-2220
Website: https://www.fws.gov/external-affairs/public-affairs/


Baby striped salamander.

Reticulated flatwoods salamander larva. Credit: Kevin Enge, FWS.
Higher Quality Version of Image

The Atlantic salt marsh snake and the frosted flatwoods salamander are among 27 federally protected species that will be getting a check-up.  

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is launching five-year status reviews of 17 endangered species and 10 threatened species occurring in one or more of the 10 states across the Southeast Region and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.  The Service is seeking comments and information from the public on all 27 species by November 24, 2014, 60 days from publication in the Federal Register.

The reviews will ensure listing classifications under the Endangered Species Act are accurate and reflect the best available information.  In addition to reviewing the classification of each one, a five-year review presents an opportunity to track the species’ recovery progress.  It may benefit species by providing valuable information to guide future conservation efforts.  Information gathered during a review can assist in making funding decisions, consideration related to reclassifying species status, conducting interagency consultations, making permitting decisions, and determining whether to update recovery plans, and other actions under the ESA.

This notice announces reviews of 17 species currently listed as endangered: 

Florida salt marsh vole, Bachman’s warbler, reticulated flatwoods salamander, southern acornshell, ovate clubshell, southern clubshell, upland combshell, triangular kidneyshell, Coosa moccasinshell, dark pigtoe, southern pigtoe, Kentucky cave shrimp, Florida golden aster, Harper’s beauty, scrub lupine, scrub plum, and wide-leaf warea.

This notice also announces the Service’s reviews of 10 species currently listed as threatened: Atlantic salt marsh snake, frosted flatwoods salamander, Alabama heelsplitter, Alabama moccasinshell, orange-nacre mucket, fine-lined pocketbook, Squirrel chimney cave shrimp, palma de manaca, Geocarpon minimum (No common name), and white-haired goldenrod.

Specifically, these  reviews seek information on: (1) species biology, including population trends, distribution, abundance, demographics, and genetics; (2) habitat conditions, including amount, distribution, and suitability; (3) conservation measures that have been implemented; (4) threat status and trends; and, (5) other new information, data, or corrections, including taxonomic or nomenclatural changes; identification of erroneous information contained in the ESA list; and improved analytical methods.  Comments and materials received will be available for public inspection by appointment.

The Federal Register notice announcing the status review of these 27 federally listed species is available on-line at http://www.fws.gov/southeast/news/2014/2014-22594.pdf.  Today’s version is the pre-publication draft.  The final version can be viewed in tomorrow’s Federal Register, as well as on the above website.

Written comments and information on the specific species may be e-mailed, faxed, or sent by regular mail to:   

Mammals

Florida salt marsh vole:  North Florida Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 7915 Baymeadows Way, Suite 200, Jacksonville, FL 32256; fax 904-731-3045.  For information on these species, contact Bill Brooks at 904-731-3136, or bill_brooks@fws.gov @fws.gov

 

Birds

Bachman’s warbler, found in Florida and South Carolina: South Carolina Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 176 Croghan Spur Road, Suite 200, Charleston, SC 29407; fax 843-727-4218.  For information on this species, contact Paula Sisson at 843-727-4707, or paula_sisson@fws.gov

 

Reptiles

Atlantic salt marsh snake, found in Florida:  North Florida Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 7915 Baymeadows Way, Suite 200, Jacksonville, FL 32256; fax 904-731-3045.  For information on these species, contact Todd Mecklenborg at 727-892-4104, or todd_mecklenborg@fws.gov

 

Amphibians

Reticulated flatwoods salamander, found in Florida and Georgia, and frosted flatwoods salamander, found in Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina:  Panama City Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1601 Balboa Ave., Panama City, FL 32405; fax 850-763-2177.  For information on these species, contact Harold Mitchell at 850-769-0552, or harold_mitchell@fws.gov

 

Mussels

For all mussel species:  Alabama Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1208-B Main Street, Daphne, AL 36526; fax 251-441-6222.  For information on these species, contact Jeff Powell at 251-441-5181, or jeff_powell@fws.gov.  These clams are the southern acornshell (Alabama and Tennessee); ovate clubshell (Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennessee); southern clubshell (Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi); upland combshell (Alabama and Tennessee); triangular kidneyshell (Alabama, Georgia, Tennesse); Coosa moccasinshell (Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee); dark pigtoe (Alabama); southern pigtoe (Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee); Alabama heelsplitter Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi);  Alabama moccasinshell (Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi); orange-nacre mucket (Alabama and Mississippi) , and the fine-lined pocketbook (Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee)

 

Crustaceans and Plants

Kentucky cave shrimp (crustacean) and white haired goldenrod (Kentucky plant):  Kentucky Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 330 West Broadway, Suite 365, Frankfort, KY 40601; fax 502-695-1024.  For information on this species, contact Mike Floyd at 502-695-0468, or mike_floyd@fws.gov.

Squirrel Chimney cave shrimp (Florida crustacean), Florida golden aster (Florida plant), scrub lupine (Florida plant), scrub plum (Florida plant):  North Florida Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 7915 Baymeadows Way, Suite 200, Jacksonville, FL 32256; fax 904-731-3045.  For information on these species, contact Todd Mecklenborg at 727-892-4104, or todd_mecklenborg@fws.gov

Geocarpon minimum (plant found in Arkansas Louisiana, Missouri, and Texas):  Arkansas Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 26320 Highway 33, Augusta, AR 72006; fax 870-347-2908.  For information on this species, contact Jason Phillips at 870-347-1617, or jason_phillips@fws.gov.

Harper’s beauty (Florida plant):  Panama City Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1601 Balboa Ave., Panama City, FL 32405; fax 850-763-2177.  For information on this species, contact Vivian Negron-Ortiz at 850-769-0552, ext. 231, or vivian_negronorttiz@fws.gov.

Palma de manaca (Puerto Rican plant):  Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, PO Box 491, Boqueron, PR 00622; fax 787-851-7440.  For information on this species, contact Maritza Vargas at 787-851-7297, ext. 215, or maritza_vargas@fws.gov.

 

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. For more information, visit www.fws.gov.  Connect with our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/usfwssoutheast, follow our tweets at www.twitter.com/usfwssoutheast, watch our You Tube Channel at http://www.youtube.com/usfws and download photos from our Flickr page at http://www.flickr.com/photos/usfwssoutheast

Information contained in older news items may be outdated. These materials are made available as historical archival information only. Individual contacts have been replaced with general External Affairs office information. No other updates have been made to the information and we do not guarantee current accuracy or completeness.


The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov/. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel and download photos from our Flickr page.