The Big Dry Arm Spring Storm in the Great Basin Red Cliffs Desert Tortoise Reserve March Morning on the Platte River After a Spring Storm in the Great Basin Hunting Upland Birds at Kingsbury Lake Waterfowl Production Area Sandhill Migration on the Platte River Badlands Sunrise The Green River at Ouray NWR North Park Lupines Moab Sunset

Partners for Fish & Wildlife - Colorado

 

Overview | Accomplishments | Focus Areas | Wetland Wildlife Conservation Program | Contact Us | Open / Close All

  • White-faced ibis foraging. Credit: USFWS.

    White-faced ibis foraging. Credit: USFWS.

  • Pelicans on restoration. Credit: USFWS.

    Pelicans on restoration. Credit: USFWS.

  • Little Snake River project. Credit: USFWS.

    Little Snake River project. Credit: USFWS.

  • Colorado SLV riparian project. Credit: USFWS.

    Colorado SLV riparian project. Credit: USFWS.

  • Restored Playa Basin, Colorado. Credit: USFWS.

    Restored Playa Basin, Colorado. Credit: USFWS.

  • Restored Playa Basin, Colorado. Credit: USFWS.

    Restored Playa Basin, Colorado. Credit: USFWS.

  • Colorado RAW students. Credit: USFWS.

    Colorado RAW students. Credit: USFWS.

  • Migrating waterfowl on restored wetland. Credit: USFWS.

    Migrating waterfowl on restored wetland. Credit: USFWS.

The Colorado Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program began in 1988 and has evolved into a truely statewide cooperative effort. Colorado Parks & Wildlife (CPW), CPW Wetland Wildlife Conservation Program, Great Outdoors Colorado (lottery proceeds), Ducks Unlimited, The Nature Conservancy, Natural Resources Conservation Service, local Water and Soil Conservation Districts, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and over 1,000 landowners have combined to restore and protect wetland, upland, and riparian habitat.


Overview »

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Priorities | Goals | Technical Assistance | Wetland Projects


Priorities

E-Channel construction, Colorado. Credit: USFWS

E-Channel construction, Colorado. Credit: USFWS.

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Colorado Partners for Fish and Wildlife sets project priorities based upon three principal factors:

  1. Federal trust species interests
  2. The goals of the Fish and Wildlife Service and our major partners
  3. Significant habitat restoration or management potential on private land must be available for the Partners Program to pursue projects

Where these three factors intersect is a key component for determination of where the program should focus its efforts in Colorado.


Goals

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Long term goals for the Colorado Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program include:

  • Working with our partners to prevent the need for futher listing of species as endangered or threatened due to habitat loss
  • Restoring Colorado's riparian and wetland systems
  • Contributing to conservation on a landscape scale

The potential for success is best measured not in acres or miles but in the willingness of Colorado's landowners to participate in voluntary, targeted wildlife conservation. Given the significant landscape changes which have occurred and will continue to occur in Colorado, success will need to be measured in the continued viability of Colorado's biodiversity.


Technical Assistance

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Colorado Partners for Fish and Wildlife provides advice and information on a variety of issues:

  • Wetland and riparian restoration
  • Food and shelter for fish and wildlife
  • Soil and water quality improvement
  • Grazing plans to benefit livestock and wildlife
  • Native plant restoration
  • Water level management


Wetland Projects

Waterfowl in flight. Credit: USFWS.

Waterfowl in flight. Credit: USFWS.

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Wetland projects in Colorado are primarily restoration activities involving the use of contour terraces and water control to restore wet meadow vegetation. Seasonal and temporary water regimes predominate, providing nesting, foraging and migration habitat for resident and migratory species. Fencing and grazing management are often a part of our projects, particularly in the San Luis Valley where residual cover for nesting is often a principal goal.

Upland restoration and enhancement projects have centered on the habitat needs of the lesser prairie chicken and Gunnison sage grouse. In both cases, grazing management, re-vegetation, fencing, and alternate livestock water sources are the common techniques.

Fencing has been the most common riparian restoration and enhancement technique. The Colorado Partners Program has participated in re-vegetation efforts on occasion, but they are usually associated with projects where an immediate vegetative response is required. Stream restoration training is being acquired by Colorado Partners staff , and we hope to do more in-channel work in the future. It is expected that riparian restoration will be a major component of these projects.


Accomplishments »

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Restored Playa Basin, Colorado. Credit: USFWS.

Restored Playa Basin, Colorado. Credit: USFWS.

FY 2013 Accomplishments

Wetlands: 1,171 Acres
Riparian/In-Stream: 8 Miles
Uplands:3,630 Acres

FY 1988-2013 Cumulative Accomplishments

Wetlands: 32,416 Acres
Riparian/In-Stream:321 Miles
Uplands: 120,876 Acres


Focus Areas »


Contact Us »

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State Coordinator

Bill Noonan
Partners for Fish and Wildlife
134 Union Blvd, Ste 400
Lakewood, CO 80228
(303) 236-5462
bill_noonan@fws.gov

Northwest Colorado

Bob Timberman
Partners for Fish and Wildlife
953 Jackson County Road #32
Walden, CO 80480
(970) 723-4926
bob_timberman@fws.gov

Southwest Colorado

Corey Kanuckel
Gunnison - Remote
74 Candlelight Lane
Gunnison, CO 81203
(719) 849-1081
corey_kanuckel@fws.gov

Northeast Colorado

Greg Stoebner
Partners for Fish and Wildlife
621 Iris Drive
Sterling, CO 80751
(970) 522-7440 X133
greg_stoebner@fws.gov

San Luis Valley

Corey Kanuckel
Gunnison-Remote
74 Candlelight Lane
Gunnison, CO 81230
(719) 849-1081
corey_kanuckel@fws.gov

Southeast Colorado

Katy Fitzgerald
Partners for Fish and Wildlife
5610 Industrial Place
Colorado Springs,CO 80916
(719) 632-9598 X105
katy_fitzgerald@fws.gov

 

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with Others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American People.
Last modified: November 14, 2019
All Images Credit to and Courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Unless Specified Otherwise.
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