The Big Dry Arm Spring Storm in the Great Basin Red Cliffs Desert Tortoise Reserve March Morning on the Platte River After a Spring Storm in the Great Basin Hunting Upland Birds at Kingsbury Lake Waterfowl Production Area Sandhill Migration on the Platte River Badlands Sunrise The Green River at Ouray NWR North Park Lupines Moab Sunset
Refuge System - Law Enforcement
Mountain-Prairie Region
Graphic button showing the 8 state mountain prairie region

Law Enforcement

 

What Do Federal Wildlife Officers Do? | Laws and Regulations | Open / Close All

  • Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge Youth Hunt. Credit: USFWS.

    Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge Youth Hunt. Credit: USFWS.

  • Close quarters training annual law enforcement in-service training. Credit: USFWS.

    Close quarters training annual law enforcement in-service training. Credit: USFWS.

  • Service law enforcement officers on horseback. Credit: USFWS.

    Service law enforcement officers on horseback. Credit: USFWS.

  • Federal Wildlife Officer Marked Vehicle. Credit: USFWS.

    Federal Wildlife Officer Marked Vehicle. Credit: USFWS.

  • Winter Waterfowl Enforcement at Bear River MBR. Credit: USFWS.

    Winter Waterfowl Enforcement at Bear River MBR. Credit: USFWS.

  • Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: USFWS.

    Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: USFWS.

  • North Dakota Conservation Easement Enforcement. Credit: USFWS.

    North Dakota Conservation Easement Enforcement. Credit: USFWS.

Refuge Law Enforcement

Map of the 8 state Mountain-Prairie Region.

The Division of Refuge Law Enforcement supports the conservation mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Refuge law enforcement officers, called Federal Wildlife Officers, are responsible for protecting wildlife and habitat, protecting cultural resources, safeguarding refuge facilities and infrastructure, and ensuring public safety.

Patrolling by land, air, and water, Federal Wildlife Officers are on the front lines of resource conservation on national wildlife refuges, wetland management districts, and other U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lands in the Region. These officers perform a full range of law enforcement duties such as hunting and fishing enforcement, resource patrols, conservation easement monitoring and enforcement, investigations, special events support, decoy operations, game check stations, and public outreach.


What do Federal Wildlife Officers do? »

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  • Perform a full range of law enforcement duties including patrols, surveillance, investigations, apprehensions, case management, and judicial proceedings.
  • Enforce Federal wildlife statutes and conservation laws that protect wildlife, natural and cultural resources, agency employees, and the public.
  • Enforce Federal regulations governing hunting, fishing, and public use on national wildlife refuges, wetland management districts, and other Service managed lands.
  • Includes field specialties such as Easement Enforcement Officer, Field Training Officer, and Canine Officer.
  • Perform patrol operations in diverse settings and environments including vehicle, boat, plane, all-terrain vehicle, horseback, and foot.
  • Work with hunters, anglers, bird watchers, youth, and other user groups to educate the public about National Wildlife Refuge System lands, programs, and resources.
  • Work in cooperation with other federal, state, and local agencies.


How Do I Become a Federal Wildlife Officer?

Service Law Enforcement badge. Credit: USFWS.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Law Enforcement badge.


A Day in the Life of a Federal Wildlife Officer


Laws and Regulations »

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with Others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American People.
Last modified: April 28, 2015
All Images Credit to and Courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Unless Specified Otherwise.
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