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News & Releases
Mountain-Prairie Region

News Release

Conservation Area Proposed in Northwest Montana Would Support American Grizzly Bear Populations, Canada Lynx, Elk, and Much More

For Immediate Release

September 16, 2020


A landscape image of low rolling hills with a lake in the center
A photo of a portion of the Lost Trail Conservation Area. Photo courtesy of Chris Boyer/Kestrelaerial.com

Today, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) released a draft environmental assessment and draft land protection plan outlining a proposal to establish the Lost Trail Conservation Area in northwest Montana. These documents are now available for a 30-day public review and comment.

The proposed Lost Trail Conservation Area project integrates landscape-level wildlife and habitat conservation efforts undertaken by the Service and a wide range of partners for the past 20 years. The project would protect crucial wildlife habitat and migration corridors between Glacier National Park, the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness, the Selkirk Mountains, and into the Coeur d’Alene Mountains in Idaho. These areas support threatened and endangered species including the grizzly bear, Canada lynx, and Spalding’s catchfly. The land within the project area is also a popular location for elk hunting and would support a vital migration corridor for elk and mule deer as identified by Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks. If created, the Conservation Area would secure the public’s access in perpetuity.

To establish the Conservation Area, the Service would work with willing sellers to acquire conservation easements within the project boundary (see map). The Conservation Area would provide public access, prevent residential development, and allow for sustainable commercial timber harvests across up to 100,000 acres. No taxpayer dollars would be used to purchase the easements. Instead, the Service would make purchases using federal dollars from the now permanently authorized Land and Water Conservation Fund, which uses federal offshore oil and gas leases to support the conservation of natural resources across America.

The draft environmental assessment and draft land protection plan are now available for public review and comment. The public comment period will last for 30 days, closing on October 16, 2020. To submit comments, email LTRCA_comments@fws.gov or write to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Attn: Lost Trail Comments, 922 Bootlegger Trail, Great Falls, Montana 59404.

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen in the West, visit our website, or connect with us through any of these social media channels: Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, YouTube, and Instagram.

– FWS –

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Office of External Affairs

Mountain-Prairie Region

134 Union Blvd

Lakewood, CO 80228

303-236-7905

303-236-3815 FAX

www.fws.gov/mountain-prairie/



Contacts

Jennifer Strickland
(303) 236-4574
Jennifer_Strickland@fws.gov



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The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with Others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American People.
Last modified: September 16, 2020
All Images Credit to and Courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Unless Specified Otherwise.
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