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News & Releases
Mountain-Prairie Region

News Release

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Determines Sleeping Ute Milkvetch Does Not Warrant Protection under the Endangered Species Act

For Immediate Release

October 7, 2015


DENVER- A reassessment of threats to a rare wildflower found only on Ute Mountain Ute Tribal land in southwestern Colorado has convinced the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that the species no longer needs protection under the Endangered Species Act. As a result, the Service announced today that it has removed the Sleeping Ute milkvetch (Astragalus tortipes) from the candidate species list.

The Sleeping Ute milkvetch is a perennial plant that grows only on the Smokey Hills layer of the Mancos Shale Formation on Ute Mountain Ute Tribal land in Montezuma County, Colo.  The Service made this finding after a reappraisal of the threats to the species and new information provided by the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe.  

The Service determined the rare plant warranted ESA protection in 1996 based on concerns about current activities and the impact of planned or potential development within the species’ extremely limited range. However, a lack of resources prevented the Service from taking action to protect the species, and it was placed on the candidate species list with the consent of the tribe.  

Earlier this year, the Tribe provided the Service with results of a new plant survey that estimated nearly 20,000 individual plants, almost five times as many as reported in 2000. The survey also demonstrated that the plants appeared to be flourishing in areas marked by activities such as grazing, OHV use and some heavy-equipment grading, suggesting it may be adapted to disturbance. In addition, potential oil and gas development, once thought to pose a threat to the species, is no longer anticipated to occur within the species’ limited range. Operation of an irrigation canal did not have the predicted negative impacts.  

Based on this new information and a reanalysis of previously identified risks, there are no known or anticipated impacts that rise to a level sufficient to threaten or endanger the species throughout all or a portion of its range. The species no longer meets the definition of a threatened or endangered species, and the Service recommends removing it from the candidate species list. The Ute Mountain Ute Tribe supports the Service’s recommendation. 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service works with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. For more information, visit www.fws.gov, or connect with us through any of these social media channels:Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, YouTube.

 

 

– FWS –

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Office of External Affairs

Mountain-Prairie Region

134 Union Blvd

Lakewood, CO 80228

303-236-7905

303-236-3815 FAX

www.fws.gov/mountain-prairie/



Contacts

Steve Segin
(303) 236-4578
robert_segin@fws.gov
 



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The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with Others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American People.
Last modified: October 07, 2015
All Images Credit to and Courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Unless Specified Otherwise.
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