The Big Dry Arm Spring Storm in the Great Basin Red Cliffs Desert Tortoise Reserve March Morning on the Platte River After a Spring Storm in the Great Basin Hunting Upland Birds at Kingsbury Lake Waterfowl Production Area Sandhill Migration on the Platte River Badlands Sunrise The Green River at Ouray NWR North Park Lupines Moab Sunset
Office of Law Enforcement
Mountain-Prairie Region
Graphic button showing the 8 state mountain prairie region

About Us

What Does Law Enforcement Work Include? | More About Service Law Enforcement | Additional Resources | Open / Close All

What is Service Law Enforcement?

A man wearing a law enforcement vest stands behind a cargo truck full of brown boxes. One box is open and looks to contain about 30 white containers

Agents seize illegal shipment of caviar being smuggled into the United States. Photo by USFWS

The Office of Law Enforcement contributes to Service efforts to manage ecosystems, save endangered species, conserve migratory birds, preserve wildlife habitat, restore fisheries, combat invasive species, and promote international wildlife conservation.


Service law enforcement today focuses on potentially devastating threats to wildlife resources -- illegal trade, unlawful commercial exploitation, habitat destruction, and environmental contaminants. The Office of Law Enforcement investigates wildlife crimes, regulates wildlife trade, helps Americans understand and obey wildlife protections laws, and works in partnership with international, state, and tribal counterparts to conserve wildlife resources.


When fully staffed, the Office of Law Enforcement includes 261 special agents and somre 140 wildlife inspectors. Most are "officers on the beat" who report through eight regional law enforcement offices. A headquarters Office of Law Enforcement provides national oversight, support, policy, and guidance for Service investigations and the wildlife inspection program; trains Service law enforcement personnel; fields a special investigations unit; and provides budget, management and administrative support for the Office of Law Enforcement.


Rewards Program:

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is authorized to pay rewards for information or assistance that leads to an arrest, a criminal conviction, civil penalty assessment, or forfeiture of seized property. Payment of rewards is the discretion of the Service and is linked to specific federal wildlife laws. The amount of any reward we may pay is commensurate with the information or assistance received. Please discuss the possibility of receiving a reward with the Service personnel receiving your information or assistance.


To Report a Wildlife Crime:

Email: fws_tips@fws.gov
Call: 1- 844-397-8477


What Does Service Law Enforcement Work Include? »

A woman wearing a USFWS Law Enforcement uniform stands at a table under a tent cover. On the table are furs of tigers and bears, skulls, and wildlife products

Wildlife Inspector identifies and inspects all wildlife coming into out out of the United States at the Sweetgrass, MT port of entry. Photo by USFWS

 

  • Breaking up international and domestic smuggling rings that target imperiled animals
  • Preventing the unlawful commercial exploitation of protected U.S. species
  • Protecting wildlife from environmental hazards and safeguarding critical habitat for endangered species
  • Enforcing federal migratory game bird hunting regulations and working with states to protect other game species from illegal take and preserve legitimate hunting opportunities
  • Inspecting wildlife shipments to ensure compliance with laws and treaties and detect illegal trade
  • Working with international counterparts to combat illegal trafficking in protected species
  • Training other federal, state, tribal, and foreign law enforcement officers
  • Using forensic science to analyze evidence and solve wildlife crimes
  • Distributing information and outreach materials to increase public understanding of wildlife conservation and promote compliance with wildlife protection laws

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More About Service Law Enforcement »

A man wearing a black USFWS polo and a lanyard kneels next to a small truck that is carrying a sedated grizzly bear

Agents help move grizzly bears to a new home in Wyoming. Photo by USFWS

 

The Clark R. Bavin National Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory conducts scientific analyses that support federal, state, and international investigations of wildlife crime. The Office of Law Enforcement also maintains a National Wildlife Property Repository, which supplies abandoned and forfeited wildlife items to schools, universities, museums, and non-government organizations for public education, and operates the National Eagle Repository, which meets the needs of Native Americans for eagles and eagle feathers for religious use.


The Clark R. Bavin National Fish and Wildlife Forensics Laboratory conducts scientific analyses that support federal, state, and international investigations of wildlife crime. The Office of Law Enforcement also maintains a National Wildlife Property Repository, which supplies abandoned and forfeited wildlife items to schools, universities, museums, and non-government organizations for public education, and operates the National Eagle Repository, which meets the needs of Native Americans for eagles and eagle feathers for religious use.



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Additional Resources »

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with Others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American People.
Last modified: October 07, 2020
All Images Credit to and Courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Unless Specified Otherwise.
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