Bozeman Fish Technology Center
Mountain-Prairie Region
Graphic button showing the 8 state mountain prairie region

Bozeman Fish Technology Center

4050 Bridger Canyon Road | Bozeman, MT 59715
Hours: 8:00 am to 4:30 pm | Phone: (406) 587- 9265 | Fax: (406) 586-5942

Fish Passage and Screening – Projects

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Reconnecting Migratory Pathways of Prairie and Mountain Fishes: Determining Fish Passage Requirements for Fish Species Fragmented by Migration Barriers »

Reconnecting Migratory Pathways of Prairie and Mountain Fishes: Determining Fish Passage Requirements for Fish Species Fragmented by Migration Barriers

Headwaters of Fort Peck Reservoir, Missouri River. Irrigation diversion, a barrier to fish movement. Swim tunnel, a tool for accessing fish swimming and passage ability at BFTC. Credit: USFWS.

Project Title: Reconnecting Migratory Pathways of Prairie and Mountain Fishes: Determining Fish Passage Requirements for Fish Species Fragmented by Migration Barriers

Principal Investigators: Matt Blank (Western Transportation Institute), Kevin Kappenman, Joel Cahoon and Tom McMahon (Montana State University)

Lead Technician: Matt Schultz

Partners: USFS-Gallatin National Forest District, Turner Enterprises, Montana AFS, USFWS, Montana State University (MSU), Western Transportation Institute at MSU, Plains and Prairie Potholes Landscape Conservation Cooperative, MTFWP

Funding Source: Plains and Prairie Potholes Landscape Conservation Cooperative, USFS-Gallatin National Forest District, Turner Enterprises, Montana AFS, and Western Transportation Institute

Project Summary: Our nation’s waterways are obstructed by an estimated 2.5 million aquatic barriers, with estimates in Montana alone running into the thousands. Research activities and on-the-ground projects in the aquatic barrier arena often involve assessing structures to determine their barrier status, designing improved passage around or through barriers, and studying the effects of barriers on aquatic species and habitat. Many of these projects require synthesizing hydraulic modeling results or observations of hydraulic conditions with descriptions of fish swimming capabilities to determine if a fish can successfully pass a particular structure. The design and analysis of many in-stream structures, such as weirs, low-head dams, fishways, and fish barriers also require that hydraulic computations are combined with measures of fish locomotion.

 

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with Others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American People.
Last modified: April 08, 2015
All Images Credit to and Courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Unless Specified Otherwise.
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