Endangered Species
Mountain-Prairie Region
Graphic button showing the 8 state mountain prairie region

90 Day Findings

 

90 Day Findings - January 2016

Any plant or animal that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been petitioned to list and protect under the Endangered Species Act is considered “at-risk.”

When we are petitioned to provide federal protection to a species, our biologists review the information presented by the petitioner as well as the information in our files prior to the date of the petition to determine whether a closer look at the species’ status is advisable.

The following species occur in the mountain-prairie states of Colorado, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming.

We have summarized the petitioner’s claims as well as our findings below. More detail is available by clicking the link to the Federal Register docket number for each species.

Not Substantial Findings

Three petitioned species found in the Mountain-Prairie will not be given further consideration for federal protection at this time.


 


Substantial Findings - Status review initiated

Four petitioned species found in the Mountain-Prairie will be given further consideration for federal protection at this time.


Steve Amus / USDA.
Credit: Steve Amus / USDA

Western bumble bee (Bombus occidentalis)

Federal Register docket: FWS–R6–ES–2016–0023

Known occurrences: Western North America stretching down the west coast from Alaska to California and reaching as far east as Nebraska and the Dakotas.  

The Defenders of Wildlife petitioned to list the western bumble bee claiming it warrants listing due to:

  • Habitat loss and destruction
  • Disease and predation
  • Inadequacy of existing regulatory mechanisms
  • Natural or man-made factors such as climate change.

Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, the Fish and Wildlife Service finds that the petition does provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action, to list the species, may be warranted.

 

Credit:USFWS

Deseret milkvetch (Astragalus desereticus)

Federal Register docket: FWS–R6–ES–2016–0013

Known occurrences: Utah

Western Area Power Administration petitioned to delist the Deseret milkvetch on October 6, 2015, claiming that it warrants delisting because:

  • Potential threats from residential development, highway expansion, and livestock grazing have not materialized since it was listed.
  • Surveys also show a higher number, and wider range of plants, than initially thought. 

Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, the Fish and Wildlife Service finds that the petition does provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action, to delist the species, may be warranted.

 


The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with Others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American People.
Last modified: March 15, 2016
All Images Credit to and Courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Unless Specified Otherwise.
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