Endangered Species
Mountain-Prairie Region
Graphic button showing the 8 state mountain prairie region

90 Day Findings

 

90 Day Findings - January 2016

Any plant or animal that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been petitioned to list and protect under the Endangered Species Act is considered “at-risk.”

When we are petitioned to provide federal protection to a species, our biologists review the information presented by the petitioner as well as the information in our files prior to the date of the petition to determine whether a closer look at the species’ status is advisable.

The following species occur in the mountain-prairie states of Colorado, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Utah, and Wyoming.

We have summarized the petitioner’s claims as well as our findings below. More detail is available by clicking the link to the Federal Register docket number for each species.

Not Substantial Findings

Three petitioned species found in the Mountain-Prairie will not be given further consideration for federal protection at this time.


A salamander standing on a mossy rock.
Credit:USFWS

Cabinet-Yaak grizzly beat (uplist)

Federal Register docket: FWS-R8-ES-2015-0082

Known occurrences: Idaho, Montana

The Alliance for the Wild Rockies claims that the Cabinet-Yaak grizzly warrants listing due to:

  • Habitat destruction or modification
  • Disease or predation
  • Other natural or manmade factors affecting its continued existence

Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, the Fish and Wildlife Service finds that the petition does not provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action, to list the species, may be warranted.

 

A salamander standing on a mossy rock.
Credit:USFWS

Cabinet-Yaak grizzly beat (delist)

Federal Register docket: FWS-R6-ES-2015-0174

Known occurrences: Idaho, Montana

Lincoln County, Montana claims that the Cabinet-Yaak grizzly warrants listing due to:

  • Habitat destruction or modification
  • Overutilization for commercial, recreational, scientific, or educational purposes
  • Disease and predation
  • Inadequacy of existing regulatory mechanisms

Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, the Fish and Wildlife Service finds that the petition does not provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action, to list the species, may be warranted.

 

A salamander standing on a mossy rock.
Credit: Judson Spicer / USFWS

Yellowstone bison

Federal Register docket: FWS-R6-ES-2015-0123

Known occurrences: Wyoming

Western Watersheds Project, Buffalo Field Campaign, and James A. Horsley claim that the bison warrants listing due to:

  • Habitat destruction or modification, such as range curtailment
  • Overutilization for commercial, recreational, scientific, or educational purposes, such as hunting and culling
  • Disease and predation
  • Inadequacy of existing regulatory mechanisms
  • Other natural or manmade factors affecting its continued existence, such as genetic extinction and climate change

Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, the Fish and Wildlife Service finds that the petition does not provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action, to list the species, may be warranted.

 


Substantial Findings - Status review initiated

Four petitioned species found in the Mountain-Prairie will be given further consideration for federal protection at this time.


A salamander standing on a mossy rock.
Credit:

Great basin silverspot

Federal Register docket: FWS-R6-ES-2015-0089

Known occurrences: Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah

WildEarth Guardians claims that the butterfly warrants listing due to:

  • Habitat destruction or modification, such as urban development, altered hydrology, and livestock grazing
  • Overutilization for commercial, recreational, scientific, or educational purposes
  • Disease and predation
  • Inadequacy of existing regulatory mechanisms
  • Other natural or manmade factors affecting its continued existence, such as chemicals, climate change, and existence in small isolated populations

Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, the Fish and Wildlife Service finds that the petition does provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action, to list the species, may be warranted.

 

Credit: Lusha Marguerite Tronstad / Used with permission

Narrow-foot diving beetle

Federal Register docket: FWS-R6-ES-2015-0102

Known occurrences: Wyoming

WildEarth Guardians claims that the beetle warrants listing due to:

  • Habitat destruction or modification, such as livestock grazing, stream diversion, and energy development
  • Overutilization for commercial, recreational, scientific, or educational purposes
  • Disease and predation
  • Inadequacy of existing regulatory mechanisms
  • Other natural or manmade factors affecting its continued existence, such as rarity, and climate change

Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, the Fish and Wildlife Service finds that the petition does provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action, to list the species, may be warranted.

 

A salamander standing on a mossy rock.
Credit: USFWS

Northern Rocky Mountain Distinct Population Segment of fisher

Federal Register docket: FWS-R6-ES-2015-0104

Known occurrences: Idaho and Montana

The Center for Biological Diversity, Defenders of Wildlife, Friends of the Bitterroot, Friends of the Clearwater, Western Watersheds Project, and Friends of the Wild Swan claim that the fisher warrants listing due to:

  • Habitat destruction or modification, such as timber harvest and forest management, roads and development, climate change, and livestock grazing
  • Overutilization for commercial, recreational, scientific, or educational purposes, such as trapping
  • Disease and predation
  • Inadequacy of existing regulatory mechanisms
  • Other natural or manmade factors affecting its continued existence, such as small isolated population size, restricted range, and poisoning

Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, the Fish and Wildlife Service finds that the petition does provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action, to list the species, may be warranted.

 

A salamander standing on a mossy rock.
Credit: Kansas Department of Agriculture

Scott riffle beetle

Federal Register docket: FWS-R6-ES-2015-0114

Known occurrences: Kansas

WildEarth Guardians claims that the beetle warrants listing due to:

  • Habitat destruction or modification, such as dewatering of the aquifer, decreased water quality,and increased public access
  • Overutilization for commercial, recreational, scientific, or educational purposes
  • Disease and predation by non-native fish
  • Inadequacy of existing regulatory mechanisms
  • Other natural or manmade factors affecting its continued existence, such as rarity, and climate change

Based on our review of the petition and sources cited in the petition, the Fish and Wildlife Service finds that the petition does provide substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that the petitioned action, to list the species, may be warranted.

 


The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with Others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American People.
Last modified: January 11, 2016
All Images Credit to and Courtesy of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Unless Specified Otherwise.
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