Twin Cities Ecological Services Field Office

Midwest Region

 

 

Twin Cities Field Office
4101 American Boulevard East
Bloomington, MN 55425
Phone: 952-252-0092
Fax: 952-646-2873
TTY: 1-800-877-8339 (Federal Relay)

e-mail: TwinCities@fws.gov

 


Connect With Us


 

Facebook icon

Flickr icon
RSS Twitter icon
YouTube icon  

 


 

Buy Duck Stamps icon Endangered Species Day icon

 


Great Lakes Restoration Initiative logo


 

Prairie Bush Clover

Welcome

We work with public and private entities to conserve and restore Minnesota's endangered species, migratory birds, wetlands, and other important fish and wildlife resources.

Map silhouette of Minnesota Links to "contact us" information

Feature Story

Environmental Fair Outreach about Imperiled Pollinators

 

School pollinator garden during planting and one year later.

Service biologist Kelly Nail has two students spinning the pollinator trivia wheel. Students learned about monarchs, rusty patched bumble bees and other pollinators through answering the trivia questions.

 

 

April 27, 2018

 

Two Service biologists from the Minnesota-Wisconsin Ecological Services biologists, Jill Utrup and Kelly Nail, reached out to students in the Twin Cities area at Garlough Environmental Magnet School's Environmental Explorers Fair. Jill and Kelly spread the word about imperiled pollinators, including the federally endangered rusty patched bumble bee, as well as the monarch butterfly. More than 100 students took turns spinning the pollinator wheel, where they answered trivia questions about pollinators and received further information on conservation.

 

Service biologist Kelly Nail has two students spinning the pollinator trivia wheel. Students learned about monarchs, rusty patched bumble bees and other pollinators through answering the trivia questions.

Service biologist Jill Utrup assists a student in making a seed bomb. Seed bombs contain native nectar plant seeds, which are ideal for local pollinators.

 

 

After students and their families learned about these important and imperiled pollinators, students could get their hands dirty and take action to help conserve these species by making their own seed bombs! Seed bombs are created by combining clay, dirt and native nectar plant seeds into a small ball, which can be planted in any suitable location. While making seed bombs, participants were able to learn more about the importance of pollinators, and what they can do to help species like the rusty patched bumble bee. These seed bombs are then taken by participants to plant, and help provide habitat for pollinators!

 

 

 


 

 

News

 

   
Last updated: June 19, 2018