Newsroom Midwest Region

Boy Scouts of America launch new monarch conservation program

February 20, 2018

Midwest Regional Director Tom Melius joins National Capital Area Council Boy Scouts of America in kicking off new conservation program Milkweed for Monarchs. Photo courtesy of Robert Snip/Boy Scouts of America.
Midwest Regional Director Tom Melius joins National Capital Area Council Boy Scouts of America in kicking off new conservation program “Milkweed for Monarchs.” Photo courtesy of Robert Snip/Boy Scouts of America.

On February 17, more than 300 boy scouts and their families gathered at the U.S. National Arboretum to kick off a new National Capital Area Council Boy Scouts of America monarch conservation program called “Milkweed for Monarchs.” Midwest Regional Director Tom Melius, who leads the Service’s national effort to conserve the monarch butterfly, set the tone for the event by speaking about the about the importance of monarch preservation and how it relates to broader conservation issues. The event highlighted how milkweed is easy to grow and that everyone can play a part in ensuring a future filled with monarchs. After the opening ceremony, boy scouts helped pot pollinator plants and took home milkweed seed packets, along with a special event monarch conservation patch.

The Milkweed for Monarchs program engages scouts to take part in stopping the monarch butterfly decline by protecting and promoting sustainable habitat. Scouts will plant milkweed and submit photos of their projects to a photo contest, where winners will be named Top Monarch. To participate, scouts in the national capital region submit a pledge, receive seeds and a “Milkweed for Monarchs” program patch. Scouts that record their work in establishing sustainable milkweed patches can count their time toward their service hours.

The Boy Scouts of America has a long tradition of conservation and making connections to natural word through stewardship and service. We are thrilled that the National Capital Scouts are joining groups from around the country in doing their part to save the monarch butterfly!

A bumble bee and monarch butterfly on swamp milkweed. Milkweed species the only food source for monarch caterpillars. Photo by Jim Hudgins/USFWS.
A bumble bee and monarch butterfly on swamp milkweed. Milkweed species are the only food source for monarch caterpillars. Photo by Jim Hudgins/USFWS.

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

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