Inside Region 3
Midwest Region
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Service Staff having fun in the field - some of the grass is as tall as them. Photo by Alejandro Morales/USFWS. 

Service Staff having fun in the field - some of the grass is as tall as them. Photo by Alejandro Morales/USFWS. 

Regional office staff go to the field to collect seeds

Darvin Ische, a landowner in Minnesota, made a decision in 2009 to contact the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program for technical assistance in transforming his property into a restored wildlife habitat area that would benefit pheasants and pollinating insects like the monarch butterfly and the rusty patch bumble bee. By working with the Partners Program, Ische has agreed to keep his property maintained with native prairie grasses and flowers to continuously support wildlife until 2029.

Regional Director, Tom Melius poses with milkweed he found on the Ische property. Photo by Alejandro Morales/USFWS.

Regional Director, Tom Melius poses with milkweed he found on the Ische property. Photo by Alejandro Morales/USFWS.

Since the habitat restoration, Ische has allowed the Partners Program to annually collect native prairie seeds from his property to be used on other Partners Program habitat restoration projects. The thought of collecting seeds sparked a new idea, instead of a private lands biologist and a few national wildlife refuge biologists going out into the field to collect seeds - why not an armada of Service staff?

On October 13, 2016, 30 Midwest Regional Office staff tightened up their bootstraps and went out to Ische’s property in Victoria, Minnesota to collect and plant seeds from a variety of different prairie grass and flower species and do their part to support pollinators.

“Teamwork and partnering with others is how the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will support monarchs, pollinators and a plethora of other species that depend on native prairies,” said Midwest Regional Director, Tom Melius. “All of us have an important role to play in the conservation and protection of wildlife for the continuing benefit of the American people.”

By working with landowners like Darvin Ische, the Service can continue to build a legacy of conservation that will last for generations.

By Alejandro Morales
Regional Office - External Affairs

 

Service staff in the field with their bags of collected seeds from the Ische property. Photo by Alejandro Morales/USFWS.

Service staff in the field with their bags of collected seeds from the Ische property. Photo by Alejandro Morales/USFWS.

 

Last updated: November 9, 2016