Inside Region 3
Midwest Region
Select this button stylePrint Friendly

Sharing Program knowledge between Service offices is another benefit of the workshop. From left to right: Jason Krebill, Technician Ludington Biological Station; Jamie Criger, Technician Marquette Biological Station; and Matthew Lipps, Biologist Ludington Biological Station. Photo by Mara Koenig/ USFWS.

Sharing Program knowledge between Service offices is another benefit of the workshop. From left to right: Jason Krebill, Technician Ludington Biological Station; Jamie Criger, Technician Marquette Biological Station; and Matthew Lipps, Biologist Ludington Biological Station. Photo by Mara Koenig/USFWS.

Meeting of the Minds

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Ludington Biological Station recently hosted the bi-annual Sea Lamprey Workshop in Traverse City, Michigan.

Every two years the Service, the Great Lakes Fishery Commission Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada and U.S. Geological Survey gather to discuss all facets of the Sea Lamprey Control Program. Numerous researchers from United States and Canadian universities shared significant findings relevant to the program. All program level staff are involved with the presentations, ranging from field technicians to graduate researchers to senior managers.

The two day workshop opened with sea lamprey news, updates and accolades from program leadership. Topics ranged from biological issues to new and innovative technology. Roughly twenty presentations were given including a plenary keynote by recently retired Service Sea Lamprey Control Program Manager Bob Adair, reflecting upon 18 years in Sea Lamprey Control.

The second day of the workshop included breakout sessions to discuss updated protocols, share equipment improvements and collaborate on field activities for the upcoming season. The workshop provided a venue for the ‘meeting of the minds’ to share the latest and greatest in the continuing battle against sea lamprey in the Great Lakes.

The Sea Lamprey Control Program continues to work closely with partners to manage populations of sea lampreys in tributaries of the Great Lakes, to protect the fishery and related economic activities in the Great Lakes basin, an estimated annual benefit of more than $7 billion annually to the region. The Service delivers a program of integrated sea lamprey control in U.S. waters of the Great Lakes in partnership with the Great Lakes Fishery Commission.

By Jenna Tews
Ludington Biological Station

Dale Burkett, Sea Lamprey Control Program Director with the Commission, presented Bob Adair, retired Service Sea Lamprey Control Program Manager with a congratulatory letter of recognition for his years of service and accomplishments with the Sea Lamprey Control Program. Photo by Mara Koenig/USFWS.

Dale Burkett, Sea Lamprey Control Program Director with the Commission, presented Bob Adair, retired Service Sea Lamprey Control Program Manager with a congratulatory letter of recognition for his years of service and accomplishments with the Sea Lamprey Control Program. Photo by Mara Koenig/USFWS.

 

Last updated: March 4, 2016