Inside Region 3
Midwest Region
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It's time to be on the lookout for mission critical science needs. Photo by Bruce Hallman/USFWS.

It's time to be on the lookout for mission critical science needs. Photo by Bruce Hallman/USFWS.

Start Thinking About Mission Critical Science

Conservation challenges surround U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees on a routine basis. Every year, Service personnel have an opportunity to overcome some of these challenges with the help of U.S. Geological Survey’s Science Support and Quick Response Program.

Defined by an emphasis on cooperative problem-solving, the program allows for USGS and Service staff to work collaboratively on projects that promote mission critical science. The Science Support Program (SSP) is supported by approximately $4 million nationwide each year, and the Quick Response Program (QRP) gets another $350,000.

While it’s still cold outside it’s time to get those thinking caps on.

With more than half a million dollars in 2014 projects recently announced for the Midwest Region, the 2015 search for proposals will begin soon. In the next month or two, request for proposals will be posted with an anticipated due date of early June.

Looking for inspiration? Check out the 2014 funding recipients below.

1. NEW Marsh bird response to invasive cattail control using grazing, mowing, and herbicide application in the prairie pothole region. Total cost: $46,000. FWS Project Officer: Andrew Forbes

2. NEW Spatial analysis of stable isotope data to identify foraging movement patterns, and potential for competition among Lake Michigan salmonies. Total cost: $21,351 ($17,777 for 2015, and $3,574 for 2016).  FWS Project Officer: Matthew Kornis

3. NEW Developing a framework for evaluating tallgrass prairie reconstruction methods and management.   Total cost: $35,000. FWS Project Officer: Karen Viste-Sparkman

4. NEW Determining the existence of legacy effects on vegetation from large-scale water level manipulation. Total cost: $38, 697 ($32,494 for 2015, and $6,203 for 2016). FWS Project Officer: Stephen Winter

5. NEW Use of genetic analysis for the identification of Asian carp reproduction in the Upper Mississippi River basin. Total cost: $50,400 ($25,200 for 2015, and $25,200 for 2016). FWS Project Officer: Ann Runstrom

6. Development of a community-level forecasting model for pallid and shovelnose sturgeon and associated chub species in the lower Missouri River.  FY 2015 cost: $98,900. FWS Project Officer: Wyatt Doyle

7. Range-wide migratory connectivity for full-cycle conservation of the Golden-winged Warbler, a climate-sensitive songbird of highest conservation concern. FY 2015 cost: $50,000. FWS Project Officer: Tom Will

8. Identification of summer habitat of the federally endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) and three other bat species of special concern with the Ozark - Central Recovery Unit; with application for landscape distribution use. FY 2015 cost: $69,339. FWS Project Officer: Karen Mangan

9. Range-wide assessment on the impacts of changing climate on the endangered, migratory Kirtland's Warbler population. FY 2015 cost: $31,675. FWS Project Officer: Christie Deloria

10. Development of eDNA techniques for detection of endangered Purple Cat's Paw Pearlymussel and Snuffbox. FY 2015 cost: $35,635. FWS Project Officer: Darin Simpkins

11. Determine the origin of invasive sea lampreys in the Cheboygan River, Michigan. FY 2015 cost: $54,824. FWS Project Officer: Michael Twohey

12. Determining potential isotopic and trace element otolith markers for application in identifying Asian carp spawning and rearing habitats in the Upper Mississippi River System above Lock and Dam 19. FY 2015 cost: $13,883. FWS Project Officer: Ann Runstrom
 

Quick Response Project

1. NEW Eagle exposure assessment for anticoagulants, lead and mercury. Total cost: $28,529. FWS Project Officer: Maria Boroja

By Katie Steiger-Meister
Regional Office – External Affairs

 

Last updated: March 5, 2015