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Kids and families learn about pollinators

Service biologist Kelly Nail helps two students spin the pollinator trivia wheel. Photo by Jill Utrup/USFWS

Service biologist Kelly Nail helps two students spin the pollinator trivia wheel. Photo by Jill Utrup/USFWS.

Jill Utrup and Kelly Nail, two U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists from the Minnesota-Wisconsin Ecological Services office, reached out to students in the Twin Cities area at Garlough Environmental Magnet School's Environmental Explorers Fair. Utrup and Nail spread the word about imperiled pollinators, including the federally endangered rusty patched bumble bee, as well as the monarch butterfly. More than 100 students took turns spinning the pollinator wheel, where they answered trivia questions about pollinators and received further information on conservation.

After students and their families learned about these important and imperiled pollinators, students got the opportunity to get their hands dirty and take action to help conserve these species by making their own seed bombs! Seed bombs are created by combining clay, dirt and native nectar plant seeds into a small ball, which can be planted later in any suitable location. While making seed bombs, participants learned more about the importance of pollinators and what they can do to help species like the rusty patched bumble bee. These seed bombs are then taken by participants to plant and help provide habitat for pollinators!

By Kelly Nail
Minnesota-Wisconsin Ecological Service Field Office

Last updated: June 8, 2020