Inside Region 3
Midwest Region
Select this button stylePrint Friendly

14 regional scientists receive Science Enrichment Opportunity awards

The first year of the Science Enrichment Opportunity awards will provide professional development opportunities for 14 regional U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service scientists. Photo by Katie Steiger-Meister/USFWS.

The first year of the Science Enrichment Opportunity awards will provide professional development opportunities for 14 regional U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service scientists. Photo by Katie Steiger-Meister/USFWS.

By Katie Steiger-Meister
Regional Office - External Affairs

Proposals have been selected for the first-ever Science Enrichment Opportunity organized by the Midwest Science Applications program. Fourteen U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service scientists stationed in the Midwest Region will receive additional funding to support their professional development goals.

This opportunity grew out of an idea originated by Dr. Lisa Williams, Branch Chief of Environmental Contaminants, in the Michigan Field Office. Lisa chose to direct the financial proceeds of her 2013 Science Leadership Award to fund development opportunities for others in Ecological Services. Inspired by this innovative idea, this summer the Science Applications program offered a similar opportunity to employees in all Service programs across the Midwest Region. This effort directly connects with Science Applications’ objective to foster and support science excellence in the Service.

Proposal selection was based on the clear articulation of professional development goals, meaningful contribution to the work of the Service, and thought given to how the outcome or product of the science enrichment proposal would be communicated or shared with others.  Please join us in congratulating the following 2019 award recipients!

Selected 2019 Science Enrichment Opportunity Proposals

Developing an Adaptive Monitoring Framework for Invasive Sea Lamprey Through Collaboration and Knowledge Transfer, Sean Lewandoski, $3,000.

How do we distinguish between the edible and the proverbial peck of dirt in natural water for freshwater mussel diets?  Megan Bradley $9,000.

Job Shadow with Dr. Tom Augspurger, Mandy Annis, $1,800.

Real-time Inundation Mapping Tool for Big River National Wildlife Refuges, James Stack, $6,800.

Establishing a Data Science Committee for the Fish and Wildlife Service, Erica Mize, $1,572.

Radiotelemetry tracking of golden-winged warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera) in the upper Mississippi River valley, Michael Wells $15,000.

Using SQL to Improve and Enhance Big Data Management at the Midwest Fisheries Center, Maren Tuttle-Lau, $4,022.

Assessing spatial ecology of age-0 lake sturgeon in two reaches of the Menominee River, David Lawrence, $13,150.

Using Environmental DNA (eDNA) as a Detection Tool for Imperiled Freshwater Mussel Populations in the Grand River, Michigan, Jessica Collier, $14,351.

Habitat Assessment for Stream-side Reared Lake Sturgeon in the Kewaunee River, WI, Joseph Sheahan,  $14,900.

Potholes in the Prairie: Defining Wetland Hydrology ,Jennifer Gruetzman, $1,000.

A guidance report on the state of the science of eDNA: It’s feasibility for integration into USFWS programs to meet identified species needs, next steps for integration, and a summary of current eDNA resources within the Service, Andrew Stevens and Katherine Bockrath, $6,000.

Conservation social science: Understanding and integrating human dimensions into endangered species recovery, Laurel Hill/ES, $5,000.

Check back for future Inside Region 3 stories on the outcomes and experiences of 2019 award recipients.

Last updated: September 9, 2019