Midwest Region Endangered Species Conserving the nature of America

Endangered Species Program

 

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Endangered Species program is conserving and restoring threatened and endangered species and their ecosystems.

 

 

 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife

Service in the Midwest

 

The Midwest Region includes Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin. Find a location near you.

 

The Midwest Region includes Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin.
Find a location near you »

2020 News Archives

 

 

 


Rattlesnake-master borer moth does not warrant Endangered Species Act protection

 

 

A rattlesnake-master borer moth

Rattlesnake-master borer moth

Photo by Jon Rapp

 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that the rattlesnake-master borer moth, a red-brown insect with prominent white spots, does not warrant listing under the Endangered Species Act. The species is found in Arkansas, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri and Oklahoma.

 

 

SSA Report >>

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Saving the rusty patch – one garden at a time

 

 

A rusty patched bumble bee on a flower

 

How many times have you watched a documentary showing the plight of an endangered species sliding toward extinction and wondered what you can do to help? We at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have good news for those of you who live in the range of the rusty patched bumble bee: Helping save this endangered pollinator is something you can do without traveling far or spending much money. You don’t even need to leave home – in fact, you can do your part while gardening in your own backyard. Don’t have a yard? No problem – you can still plant containers on your porch, patio or balcony.

 

 

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service honors midwest endangered species recovery champions

Pictures of Rich Baker with his dog and Tam Smith in snokeling gear.

2019 Endangered Species Recovery champions Rich Baker and Tamara Smith.

We at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are pleased to announce biologists Rich Baker and Tamara Smith as the 2019 Endangered Species Recovery champions for the Great Lakes Region. Baker and Smith join individuals and teams across the United States recognized for their work last year with endangered and threatened species.

 

 

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Service seeks public comment on draft recovery plan for eastern massasauga rattlesnake

 

 

An eastern massasauga rattlesnake coiled up in the grass

Eastern massasauga rattlesnake. Photo by Abbey Kucera/USFWS.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is seeking public comment on a draft recovery plan for the eastern massasauga rattlesnake, a small and timid species that was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 2016. The goal of the plan is to ensure the long-term viability of the snake to the point at which it no longer warrants ESA protection.

 

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Eastern Massasauga Home »

 


Draft Recovery Plans for Rusty Patched Bumble Bee and Dakota Skipper Available for Comment

 

 

A dakota skipper and a rusty patched bumble bee on flowers in separate pictures

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is seeking public comment on draft plans to recover the rusty patched bumble bee, a species listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 2017 as well as the Dakota Skipper, which was listed as threatened under the ESA in 2014. The draft plans outline general management actions and criteria that indicate when the species may be considered recovered and eligible to be removed from the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife.

 

Continue reading about the Rusty Patched Bumble Bee »

Rusty Patched Bumble Bee Home »

 

Continue reading about the Dakota Skipper »

Dakota Skipper Home »

 


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Partners Celebrate Successful Recovery of Beloved Songbird
Kirtland’s Warbler No Longer Needs Endangered Species Act Protection

 

 

A kirtlands warbler

Photo by Vince Cavalieri/USFWS

Bird enthusiasts from around the world travel to northern Michigan in hopes of catching sight of a Kirtland’s warbler, a small songbird once poised on the brink of extinction. Now the species is thriving thanks to decades of effort by a diverse group of dedicated partners. Due to the species’ remarkable recovery, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced that it no longer warrants protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

 

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Kirtland's Warbler »

 


 

Midwest Endangered Species Home