Midwest Region Endangered Species Conserving the nature of America

Endangered Species Program

 

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Endangered Species program is conserving and restoring threatened and endangered species and their ecosystems.

 

 

 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife

Service in the Midwest

 

The Midwest Region includes Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin. Find a location near you.

 

The Midwest Region includes Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin.
Find a location near you »

2018 News Archives

 


 

Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership Update

 

 

Recovery Champions Kris Lah, Mark Hove, Mike Davis and Bernard Sietman.

Photo courtesy of Karen Willes.

The International Crane Foundation, based in Baraboo, Wisconsin, has a new tool for birders and other outdoor enthusiasts to keep track of the whereabouts of individual cranes in the eastern population. The interactive "Where are the whoopers" site highlights locations of cranes down to the county level – care is taken not to publicize precise locations.

 

 

Learn more »

 


Moving the needle toward recovery: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service honors midwest endangered species recovery champions

Recovery Champions Kris Lah, Mark Hove, Mike Davis and Bernard Sietman.

Photos by Minnesota DNR, University of Minnesota and USFWS.

A breakthrough conservation discovery and a career devoted to finding solutions for at-risk species define the winners of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s 2018 Endangered Species Recovery champions for the Midwest Region. The Midwest champions join individuals and teams across the United States who are recognized by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for their work last year with endangered and threatened species.

 

 

Learn more »

 


 

In search of eastern massasauga rattlesnake near and far

Eastern massasauga rattlesnake in grass

Photo by Abbey Kucera; USFWS

In the spring of 2018, staff from the Illinois-Iowa Field Office took to the field across the Midwest in search of the threatened eastern massasauga rattlesnake. At Carlyle Lake, staff assisted the Illinois Natural History Survey with their annual monitoring efforts.

 

Learn more »

Eastern Massasauga »

 


 

Service seeks public comment on permit application and proposed conservation agreement for monarch butterfly

Monarch butterfly on purple coneflower.

Photo courtesy of Joel Trick

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces the opening of a 60-day public comment periodfor an “enhancement of survival” permit application associated with a Candidate Conservation Agreement with Assurances for the monarch butterfly on energy and transportation lands.

 

Learn more »

Nationwide CCAA for Monarch Butterfly »

 


 

Missouri Population of Eastern Hellbender Proposed for Endangered Status

 

 

Nest monitors Adelyn Hanchette (left) and Anna Jocham (right) release adult male Kirtland’s after they were color-banded in Wisconsin.

After a thorough species status review, the Service determined that most populations of the eastern hellbender are not in danger of extinction and listing under the ESA is not warranted. However, the eastern hellbender population in Missouri is a distinct population segment.

 

Learn more »

Missouri DPS of Eastern Hellbender

 


Kirtland’s warbler success continues in Wisconsin

 

 

 

Nest monitors Adelyn Hanchette (left) and Anna Jocham (right) release adult male Kirtland’s after they were color-banded in Wisconsin.

The conservation success began in 2007, the year nesting Kirtland’s warblers were discovered in Wisconsin. It continued the next year, when the Badger State saw the first successful Kirtland’s warbler nest produce fledglings.

 

Learn more

 

 


WA special plover completes 1,300-mile migration

 

 

Great Lakes piping plover Bimaajii on the beach in Florida.

 

In the language of the Little Traverse Bay of Odawa Indians, his name is Bimaajii, or “one who moves about.” He’s an endangered Great Lakes piping plover, found in May 2018 on High Island in Lake Michigan by Bill Parsons and Archie Kiogama, wildlife biologists for the Odawa.

 

Learn more

Piping Plover

 


Whooping crane eastern population see the best year yet for wild-hatched chicks

 

Whooping crane chick and adult.

Six wild-hatched whooping crane chicks in Wisconsin survived to flight stage in 2018, the most since the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership began restoring a migratory population of the endangered birds in the eastern United States.

 

Learn more

Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership

 

 


Great Lakes piping plovers see a mix of recovery progress

 

 

Adult Great Lakes piping plover with leg bands, standing on sand beach.

A cold winter and poor fledging season in 2017 brought mixed results for endangered Great Lakes piping plovers in 2018. This year’s breeding population dipped to 67 pairs after several years of hovering around the 75-pair mark. On the plus side, despite fewer pairs, nesting plovers had a successful breeding season.

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A year of rusty patched bumble bee observations - still hope for the species

 

 

Rusty patched bumble bee on a purple flower, wild bergamot.

After a year of new observations for the rusty patched bumble bee, the core range of the species continues to grow. Since this species was listed as endangered in the spring of 2017, we have made new observations, primarily in southwest Minnesota, southern Wisconsin and northern Illinois. New populations have also been discovered in Iowa and Virginia.

 

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Rusty patched bumble bee

 


More Higgins eye reintroductions into the Chippewa River

 

 

Two hands holding 10 higgins eye pearly mussels that have Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags attached.

 

In August, biologists from the Minnesota-Wisconsin Field Office, Regional Office and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources assisted biologists from Genoa National Fish Hatchery in releasing 3,000 Higgins eye pearlymussels in the Chippewa River in Wisconsin -- marking the second year of this exciting effort!

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Higgins eye pearlymussels

 


Second Minnesota Bat Festival shares wonders, dispels myths

 

 

Minnesota Bat Festival participants head outdoors to try their hand at tracking bats. Photo by Jill Utrup/USFWS.

 

The second Minnesota Bat Festival at Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge aimed to celebrate the unique role bats play in our world, further visitors’ appreciation and knowledge of bats and explain why bats need our help right now more than ever.

Learn more

Indiana Bat

Northern Long-eared Bat

 


First-ever conservation bank in the Midwest will help bats

 

 

Rolling wooded hills at Chariton Hills Conservation Bank. Photo courtesy of G.Gardner/Burns & McDonnell.

 

There’s a new tool in the toolbox to help bats in the midwest, thanks to the first-ever conservation bank for imperiled species in the midwest. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service approved the Chariton Hills Conservation Bank in northern Missouri in July 2018.

Learn more

Indiana Bat

Northern Long-eared Bat

 


 

First-ever releases of Poweshiek skipperling!

 

 

Male Poweshiek skipperling on a black-eye susan.

 

We’ve reached a milestone in our efforts to prevent the extinction of the Poweshiek skipperling, an endangered prairie butterfly. In June, the Minnesota Zoo successfully released two captive-reared Poweshiek skipperling butterflies at a prairie fen site in Oakland County, Michigan.

Learn more

Poweshiek Skipperling

 


An ear to the sky: new training helps track bats

 

 

Acoustic bat monitor

 

Have you “heard” the news? A new training course called Evaluating Acoustic Bat Surveys for ESA Compliance covers the ins and outs of using acoustic bat surveys for regulatory compliance. The inaugural course was held at Mammoth Cave National Park in Kentucky from May 7 to 11, 2018.

Learn more by visiting DOI Learn and search for CSP 2111 in the courses.

Indiana Bat

Northern Long-eared Bat

 


Celebrate Pollinators!

 

 

Rusty patched bumble bee on a culver's root flower.

 

 

These hard-working animals help pollinate over 75% of our flowering plants, and nearly 75% of our crops. Often we may not notice the hummingbirds, bats, bees, beetles, butterflies, and flies that carry pollen from one plant to another as they collect nectar.

Pollinators Sweeten Summer Foods

Rusty Patched Bumble Bee

Monarch Butterfly

What you can do - Midwest Plant Guide for Rusty Patched Bumble Bee


Kids and Families Learn about Pollinators

 

 

Service biologist Jill Utrup assists a student in making a seed bomb. Seed bombs contain native nectar plant seeds.

 

Jill Utrup and Kelly Nail, two U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists from the Minnesota-Wisconsin Ecological Services office, reached out to students in the Twin Cities area at Garlough Environmental Magnet School's Environmental Explorers Fair.

Learn More »

Rusty Patched Bumble Bee

Monarch Butterfly


Recognizing champions: Making a difference for threatened and endangered species

Tom Schneider, Curator of Birds at Detroit Zoological Society has worked to recover critically endangered

We at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are pleased to announce the Midwest Region Recovery Champion Award winners for 2017. Each year we celebrate the contributions of people who have dedicated their lives to making a difference for threatened and endangered species.

Learn More »

 


Bats for the Future

 

 

Hibernating tricolored bat with symptoms of white-nose syndrome.

 

One way the Service is battling for bats is through the Bats for the Future Fund. Working with the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and the U.S. Forest Service, the Service is soliciting proposals to test or deploy white-nose syndrome treatments and management tools.

Learn More »
White-nose Syndrome

 


Service and Partners Celebrate Remarkable Conservation Victory as Once Critically Imperiled Songbird Declared Saved from Threat of Extinction

Kirtland's warbler

 

Amidst catastrophic population declines leaving fewer than 200 known pairs in existence in the early 1970s, the Kirtland's warbler seemed to be rapidly heading towards extinction. But after decades of partnership efforts among federal and state agencies, industry and conservation groups, this songbird has rebounded.

Learn More »

Kirtland's Warbler


For this Missouri bat ambassador, conservation begins at home

 

 

Dave Murphy, a commissioner of the Missouri Department of Conservation, wokring on his farm.

 

Dave Murphy doesn’t remember the first time he seriously thought about bats. Maybe it was the memories of bats occasionally entering the old farmhouse and flying around inside. “I don’t remember us ever killing one, just catching it and putting it outside.”

Learn More »

Indiana Bat


Eureka! Mussel discovery made in a tub

 

 

Tricia Anderson, Natural Resource Technician, checks the growth of juvenile mussels.

 

Tucked away just off the shore of Lake Pepin in Minnesota, the Center for Aquatic Mollusk Programs (CAMP) facility operated by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is staffed and equipped for an overarching mission: conserving native mussels. Tubs, tanks and tubes fill the research facility with the sound of running water.

 Learn More »

Freshwater Mussels


Whooping crane chicks expected to head north

 

 

Two adult whooping cranes.

 

Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership members are awaiting the return to Wisconsin of 16 young whooping cranes and hoping the coming breeding season exceeds the promising results achieved last year. The 2017 cranes represented a mix of birds hatched in the wild, birds hatched in captivity and raised by adult cranes.

Learn More »

Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership


South Korean documentarians learn from Ecological Service staff – it’s the bee’s knees!

Service staff Tamara Smith and Pete Fasbender take a selfie with members of the Chuncheon Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation, including Director Jae-Gyu Lee

A documentary film crew from Chuncheon Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation, one of the leading South Korean television and radio network companies, were in the United States for only a few days, but traveled from coast to coast to interview key subjects for their documentary about bees.

Learn More »

Rusty patched bumble bee

 

 

 


 

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