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Keeping an international focus:
Dr. John Hartig becomes Fulbright Scholar

Refuge Manager John Hartig at Humbug Marsh. Photo by Tina Shaw/USFWS.

Refuge Manager John Hartig at Humbug Marsh. Photo by Tina Shaw/USFWS.

From its establishment 16 years ago, Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge has always been focused on building international connections to restore healthy habitats along Detroit River. Now one of the refuge’s biggest champions is taking that international conservation vision beyond the refuge boundaries. The Fulbright Program announced that Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge Manager John Hartig will be the Fulbright Canada Research Chair in Governance at the Balsillie School of International Affairs.
 
Hartig will undertake multidisciplinary research as part of a project to evaluate what has been achieved and learned through 32 years of development and implementation of remedial action plans to restore impaired beneficial uses in Great Lakes Areas of Concern. The lessons learned from this research will help other countries in their efforts to clean up and restore degraded ecosystems throughout the world. Dr. Hartig has announced that he will be retiring from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on January 20, 2018.
 
Dr. Hartig is one of more than 800 U.S. citizens who will teach, conduct research and/or provide expertise abroad for the 2017-2018 academic year through the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program. Recipients of Fulbright awards are selected on the basis of academic and professional achievement as well as record of service and demonstrated leadership in their respective fields. The Fulbright Program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government and is designed to build lasting connections between the people of the United States and the people of other countries.

What’s next for Detroit International Wildlife Refuge?

View of the school ship dock and fishing pier at the Refuge Gateway. Photo courtesy of Tandem.
The refuge is on track to complete construction of a new, gold LEED-certified, 11,800 square-foot visitor center overlooking Humbug Marsh this spring. This new facility is located on the 44-acre area known as the Refuge Gateway that is adjacent to the 410-acre Humbug Marsh – Michigan’s only Wetland of International Importance. It will welcome thousands of visitors each year and serve as a hub for outdoor recreation including, fishing, birding, hunting, kayaking and canoeing, hiking, wildlife observation and environmental education.

View of the school ship dock and fishing pier at the Refuge Gateway. Photo courtesy of Tandem. The refuge is on track to complete construction of a new, gold LEED-certified, 11,800 square-foot visitor center overlooking Humbug Marsh this spring. This new facility is located on the 44-acre area known as the Refuge Gateway that is adjacent to the 410-acre Humbug Marsh – Michigan’s only Wetland of International Importance. It will welcome thousands of visitors each year and serve as a hub for outdoor recreation including, fishing, birding, hunting, kayaking and canoeing, hiking, wildlife observation and environmental education.


The refuge is on track to complete construction of a new, gold LEED-certified, 11,800 square-foot visitor center overlooking Humbug Marsh this spring. This new facility is located on the 44-acre area known as the Refuge Gateway that is adjacent to the 410-acre Humbug Marsh – Michigan’s only Wetland of International Importance. It will welcome thousands of visitors each year and serve as a hub for outdoor recreation including, fishing, birding, hunting, kayaking and canoeing, hiking, wildlife observation and environmental education.
 
Also opening this spring is a new school ship dock and fishing pier that will provide accessible, shore-based fishing opportunities on the Detroit River. The project, open to the public and anglers of all skill levels, includes a boardwalk, fishing pier, floating dock for the school ship, seating areas, shade structures and interpretive signage. Planned educational programming by the many project partners bolsters the high activity expected at the site. Michigan Sea Grant Extension plans to base its school ship here to provide vessel-based education on the Detroit River and Lake Erie, and local fishing organizations have expressed interest in hosting fishing tournaments. The facility will be a core component of the refuge interpretive program and will provide hands-on learning activities that focus on adjacent river shoreline restoration, wildlife conservation and sustainability of the Detroit River region.
 
Located along the lower Detroit River and western Lake Erie, the refuge extends from southwest Detroit to the Ohio border and has nearly seven million people within a 45-minute drive. One of the country’s 14 priority urban refuges, Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge has become a national leader in using public-private partnerships to make nature part of everyday urban life.

By Tina Shaw
Regional Office - External Affairs

 

Last updated: December 5, 2017