Endangered Species
Midwest Region

 

 

Midwest Region State Map

The Midwest Region includes Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin. Find a location near you

 


Endangered Species Program

Conserving and restoring threatened and endangered species and their ecosystems

 


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Rusty Patched Bumble Bee Guidance for

Project Proponents

Federal and Non-federal Project Reviews

 

Federal Project Review

A federal project is a project or action that is undertaken by a federal agency, uses federal funding or requires a federal permit.

Roadside prairie

Photo courtesy of Minnesota Department of Transportation

 

Step 1. If your project is located in the Service’s Midwest region, go to our S7 Technical Assistance website, which will step you through the S7 consultation process. If you determine that your project is in a county where the rusty patched bumble bee occurs or if your project does not occur in the Service’s Midwest region,

go to Step 2, below.

 

Step 2. If your project area is in a county where the rusty patched bumble bee is present or if your project does not occur in the Service’s Midwest region,

go to the rusty patched bumble bee map and determine if your project/action area overlaps a High Potential zone, a Low Potential Zone, or Historical Range, then proceed to Step 2a.

 

As an alternative option, you may also use our online tool IPaC at https://ecos.fws.gov/ipac/. Using IPaC, you can identify your specific project/action area. IPaC will provide you with a list of threatened or endangered species potentially in your project/action area.

 

a. If your project or action is in a High Potential Zone (red area on the map), S7 consultation may be necessary - go to Step 3.


b. If your project or action is in a Low Potential Zone (yellow or blue areas on the map), Section 7 consultation is not needed. Conclude "rusty patched bumble bee not present" and document your finding for your files. No further consultation required.

 

c. If your project or action is in Historic Range (gray area on the map), Section 7 consultation is not needed. Conclude "rusty patched bumble bee not present" and document your finding for your files. No further consultation required.

 

Step 3. Your project area overlaps a High Potential Zone (red area). Please read the Rusty Patch Bumble Bee S7 Guidance. The Guidance will direct your next steps.  If surveys are necessary to confirm presence or absence, go here.

 

Step 4. After reviewing the Rusty Patched Bumble Bee S7 Guidance, if you determine that suitable habitat is present in your project area and your activity may affect the rusty patched bumble bee, please contact the USFWS Field Office nearest the project location: go here for USFWS contacts in the Midwest and use this link for USFWS Field Office contacts by state. If you are interested in ways to help manage for the rusty patched bumble bee and other pollinators, please see the Conservation Management Guidelines for the Rusty Patched Bumble Bee document. 

 

Non-Federal Project Review

A non-federal project is a project or action that is not undertaken by a federal agency, does not use federal funding, or does not need a federal permit outside the context of the Endangered Species Act.


Step 1. Check the rusty patched bumble bee map to determine if your project or action is in a High Potential Zone (red area on the map). If your project or action is not within the High Potential Zone, no further action is needed. If your project or action occurs with the High Potential Zone – go to Step 2.


Step 2. Determine if your project may incidentally impact the rusty patched bumble bee - see the Section 10(a)(1)(B) Voluntary Guidance for Incidental Take Permits. This guidance will help project proponents and landowners understand the status and distribution of the rusty patched bumble bee; determine whether their projects could incidentally take the rusty patched bumble bee; and, if so, how they may plan and carry out their projects while in compliance with the Endangered Species Act.  If surveys are necessary to confirm presence or absence, go here.   If you are interested in ways to help manage for the rusty patched bumble bee and other pollinators, please see the Conservation Management Guidelines for the Rusty Patched Bumble Bee document. 

 


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Midwest Endangered Species Home

Last updated: March 22, 2018