Impressive Before and After Photos of Upgraded Ranger Facilities in India’s Kaziranga National Park

February 21, 2020

An Asian elephant.

Credit: Mike Prince / Creative Commons

India’s Kaziranga National Park is one of the country’s premiere national parks. It is home to charismatic and endangered wildlife including beloved mammals such as Asian elephants, Indian rhinoceroses, and tigers. For the past twenty years, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s International Affairs Program has been a key supporter of the national park’s infrastructure and effectiveness through grants issued by the Congressionally-authorized Asian Elephant Conservation Fund and Rhinoceros and Tiger Conservation Fund.

Asian elephants, while having a stable population in the park, still face serious threats posed by human-elephant conflict, habitat degradation, and flash floods. To support their conservation, a variety of measures are needed. Recently our agency supported the Wildlife Areas Development And Welfare Trust so that they could construct new ranger facilities in the park to help staff patrol and prevent elephant poaching. Dramatic before and after images show the difference in the quality of these new buildings that will help the park’s staff to do their jobs well. The buildings include fresh drinking water, toilets, solar electricity, wifi, and new furniture. This project was partially funded by proceeds generated through sales of the Save Vanishing Species Stamp.

Bhalukajan Anti-Poaching Camp


Before

The old anti-poaching camp facility.

Credit: Wildlife Areas Development and Welfare Trust

After

The newly constructed ranger station next to the old facility.

Credit: Wildlife Areas Development and Welfare Trust

The newly constructed ranger station.

Credit: Wildlife Areas Development and Welfare Trust

Bahibeel Anti-Poaching Camp


Before

Ranger station before new construction.

Credit: Cory Brown / USFWS

After

New ranger station post construction.

Credit: Wildlife Areas Development and Welfare Trust

New ranger station post construction.

Credit: Wildlife Areas Development and Welfare Trust