Effective January 2, 2017: The entire genus Dalbergia spp. (except for Brazilian rosewood (Dalbergia nigra), which is listed in Appendix I), the three bubinga species of Guibourtia demeusei, Guibourtia pellegriniana, and Guibourtia tessmannii, and kosso (also called African rosewood) (Pterocarpus erinaceus) have been listed in CITES Appendix II and CITES documention may be required for import and re-export of these species and items made from them. Click here for a list of CITES-listed tree species. 

For additional information on this listing, please read this letter to U.S. timber importers and re-exporters and refer to our Q&A. Additionally, we encourage you to view one or both of the informational webinars recently hosted by the International Wood Products Association (IWPA) and League of American Orchestras (LAO) on this topic. The webinars cover critical updates and provide guidance on how to comply with the laws that protect wildlife and plants.

To view the International Wood Products Association webinar, which features guidance for commercial timber and wood products traders, please visit the following URL: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/recording/825012870722049 

To view the League of American Orchestras webinar, which features guidance for traveling musicians, please visit the following URL: https://youtu.be/p7EXqrPNFFM

 

Traveling Across International Borders with Your Musical Instrument

Musical instruments may contain parts or products of species protected under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and/or the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Brazilian rosewood, tortoiseshell, and elephant ivory are among the protected species most commonly found in musical instruments.
If you are traveling with a musical instrument that contains Brazilian rosewood, elephant ivory, tortoiseshell, or another protected species, you will need to obtain proper legal documentation before crossing international borders.  You may need CITES documents for other species, particularly wildlife species, so always check before traveling.
To determine if your musical instrument contains a species listed under CITES and/or the ESA, please refer to the following lists:

If you are unsure whether you need to obtain a permit, please contact the Division of Management Authority, Branch of Permits directly.

Which Permit Application Form Should I Use?

If you have determined that your musical instrument contains a species that is protected under CITES and/or the ESA, you will need to apply for one or more of the following permits.  Be sure to plan ahead for your travel.  You should allow at least 45 days to process your application, noting that some applications may take up to 60 days.  

One time import, export, or re-export of Pre-Convention, Pre-Act, or Antique Specimens (CITES, MMPA and/or ESA)
Animal species (e.g. elephant ivory, tortoiseshell) - If you are intending to make one border crossing (either an export or re-export) with your musical instrument that contains a CITES or ESA-listed animal species, you should complete application form 3-200-23 pdf.

Plant species (e.g. Brazilian rosewood) - If you are intending to make one border crossing (either an export or re-export) with your musical instrument that contains a CITES or ESA-listed plant species, you should complete application form 3-200-32pdf.


Musical instrument certificate (“passport”) for frequent cross-border non-commercial movement of a musical instrument containing species listed under CITES and/or the ESA

To ease the paperwork burden on musicians traveling with musical instruments made from CITES-listed species, the United States put forward a proposal at the 16th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to implement a passport program that would facilitate the frequent non-commercial, cross-border movement of musical instruments for purposes including, but not limited to personal use, performance, display, and competition with the issuance of just one document.

If you are intending to make multiple border crossings with your musical instrument that contains a CITES or ESA-listed species, you should complete application form 3-200-88.

Before traveling with your CITES- listed musical instrument, we recommend that you contact the national CITES authorities in the countries to which you are traveling. For a complete list of national CITES authorities, click here.

For more information on traveling internationally with your musical instrument, click here pdf
For general information on CITES permit requirements, click here pdf.

Traveling Through A Designated Port

If your musical instrument contains elephant ivory, tortoiseshell, or another protected wildlife species, you will need to travel through a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) designated port. For a complete list of FWS designated ports, click here.

If your musical instrument contains a CITES-listed plant species, such as Brazilian rosewood, you will need to travel through a USDA-APHIS CITES designated port. For a complete list of USDA-APHIS CITES designated ports, click here.