Building a Stronger Coast
A closer look at coastal habitat

Ophelia Inlet, NC

April 20, 2017 - The North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC), a partnership of federal and state agencies, tribes, universities and private organizations that supports strategic conservation through collaboration, recently released a shoreline habitat inventory measuring the extent of sandy beach, tidal inlets, and modifications to these natural features, from Maine to North Carolina. Information from the three-year project, supported by Hurricane Sandy recovery funds, will help land managers identify and protect habitat for threatened and endangered species along the coast.

This rich data source is the first of its kind and is available online. The project lead, Coastal Geologist Tracy Rice, hopes, “it can be of benefit to anyone who needs it and can use it,” including local, state, and federal agencies and others who are involved in coastal environmental and marine life issues.

Read a feature article on the inventory in Coastal Review Online





Welcome Back -- Where Have You Been?

A piping plover with chicks. Credit: USFWS

April 17, 2017 - This time of year, piping plovers are returning to beaches up and down the East Coast, preparing to lay eggs and raise chicks in their summer homes. But where have these shorebirds been all winter? Biologists are gradually gathering answers through shorebird surveys in the Caribbean.

Learn more



A piping plover with chicks.
Credit: USFWS


Infrastructure project at Great Dismal Swamp Refuge benefits wildlife and people

New half-moon water control structures like the one shown here will allow staff at Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge to manage water levels to rehydrate peat soils and reduce flooding of nearby communities. Credit: USFWS

March 31, 2017 - Managers at Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge are feeling anything but dreary about a nearly completed project designed to manage water levels at the northern end of the refuge. The $3.1-million undertaking was supported by federal funding for hurricane sandy recovery and will improve fire suppression, flood control, and habitat management abilities. This is good news for refuge staff and local communities alike.

Learn more



New half-moon water control structures like the one shown here will allow staff at Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge to manage water levels to rehydrate peat soils and reduce flooding of nearby communities.
Credit: USFWS


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Last updated: April 28, 2017