Building a Stronger Coast
New Living Shoreline on Maryland’s Eastern Shore

Aerial view of the new living shoreline along Fog Point at Glenn L. Martin National Wildlife Refuge.

June 27, 2016 - Work is complete on a 21,000-foot living shoreline project at Fog Point on the Glenn L. Martin National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Maryland’s Eastern Shore. The project will slow shoreline erosion, protecting vital tidal wetlands as well as benefiting the communities of Smith Island.

The new living shoreline consists of rock breakwaters to slow wave energy and restored marsh to help stabilize the shoreline and re-create wetlands lost to erosion. Funding for the $9 million project came from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service under the Hurricane Sandy Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013.

This work will help protect a highly vulnerable shoreline, one that was eroding at rates as high as 10-15 feet per year in some areas. It also protects saltwater habitats important to the area’s soft crab fishery, a resource that local residents of nearby Smith Island depend on for their livelihoods.

Read the press release



Aerial view of the new living shoreline along Fog Point at Glenn L. Martin National Wildlife Refuge.
Credit: USFWS


Underground Utility Lines to Improve Safety at Sachuest Point

Rebuilt road at Sachuest Point. Credit: Tom Sturm/USFWS

June 27, 2016 - A project is underway that will improve recreation and safety at Sachuest Point National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Middeltown, RI, by burying 7,000 feet of above-ground power and communication lines along Sachuest Point Road. The $1.1 million project is funded by the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act following Hurricane Sandy and is expected to be finished by late fall.

In 2012 damage from Hurricane Sandy left the refuge without power for almost six months. The new underground utility lines will stand up better during future storms, improving safety for the public. The new utility lines will also help restore scenic ocean vistas, which help attract nearly 200,000 visitors to the refuge each year.

This project is part of a larger effort to restore and protect the refuge after Hurricane Sandy, including restoration of coastal salt marshes to improve natural defenses along the coast. The main access road to the refuge, which was washed out in the hurricane, has already been repaired.

Refuge visitors should expect traffic delays during the utility construction.

Read the press release
Read about it in the Newport Daily News


Rebuilt road at Sachuest Point.
Credit: Tom Sturm/USFWS


Volunteers Plant Marsh at Sunken Meadow

Volunteers planting at Sunken Meadow State Park. Credit: Save the Sound/CFE

June 11, 2016 — Volunteers planted an acre of marshland at Sunken Meadow State Park as part of a multi-year effort to restore the marsh, improve water quality and make the park's shoreline more resilient to waves and flooding. Some 48 volunteers joined staff from Save the Sound and NY Parks to plant 2,000 cordgrass shoots at the park.

“By restoring the tidal marsh, we’re improving habitat for wildlife and making this park more resilient in the face of future storms” said Suzanne Paton, supervisory biologist with USFWS’s Southern New England Coastal Program.

The effort is part of a $2.5 million-dollar project funded by the Hurricane Sandy Coastal Resiliency Competitive Grant Program and administered by Save the Sound with a team of governmental and non-profit partners including U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Read the press release



Volunteers planting at Sunken Meadow State Park.
Credit: Save the Sound/CFE


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Last updated: July 27, 2016