Building a Stronger Coast
Prime Hook NWR Goes Back to the Future

A newly constructed wide, low dune, planted with American beach grass, offers protection from storm surge and sea-level rise. Credit: USFWS

April 24, 2017 - A $38-million project at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, supported by federal funding for Hurricane Sandy recovery, improves conditions for wildlife and the local community.

Learn more



A newly constructed wide, low dune, planted with American beach grass, offers protection from storm surge and sea-level rise.
Credit: USFWS


Heavy Equipment Makes Light Work of Marsh Restoration

A Komatsu excavator moves sediment into position and levels the ground by dragging the bucket back and forth across the marsh. Credit: USFWS

April 21, 2017 - At the Long Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex, big machines like excavators help restore delicate high salt marsh habitat by building marsh elevation. Equipment operators work as quickly and carefully as possible to minimize harm to sprouting vegetation. Marsh restoration benefits species such as saltmarsh sparrows and makes the coast more resilient to future storms and sea-level rise.

Learn more



A Komatsu excavator moves sediment into position and levels the ground by dragging the bucket back and forth across the marsh. Credit: USFWS
Credit: USFWS


A closer look at coastal habitat

Ophelia Inlet, NC

April 20, 2017 - The North Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC), a partnership of federal and state agencies, tribes, universities and private organizations that supports strategic conservation through collaboration, recently released a shoreline habitat inventory measuring the extent of sandy beach, tidal inlets, and modifications to these natural features, from Maine to North Carolina. Information from the three-year project, supported by Hurricane Sandy recovery funds, will help land managers identify and protect habitat for threatened and endangered species along the coast.

This rich data source is the first of its kind and is available online. The project lead, Coastal Geologist Tracy Rice, hopes, “it can be of benefit to anyone who needs it and can use it,” including local, state, and federal agencies and others who are involved in coastal environmental and marine life issues.

Read a feature article on the inventory in Coastal Review Online





Next

More Stories

Connect with Us

Facebook Flickr Twitter Wordpress YouTube

State Fact Sheets - What's happening in your state?


Infographic: Building a Stronger Coast

Thumbnail of Hurricane Sandy infographic


Restoration & Repair Videos


Hurricane Sandy Photos

View More Images

Last updated: April 28, 2017