Looking for Something in Particular?

Date to Start Search: (dd/mm/yyyy)

Date to End Search: (dd/mm/yyyy)

Stories from the Home Page

Students from the Florida Atlantic University Pine Jog Environment Center help with native restoration at Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Ian Shive / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Over $2 Million Awarded to New and Expanded Urban Partnerships Across the U.S.

July 27, 2016

The opportunities for residents of major urban areas across the country to gain that all-important access to nature and the outdoors have received a substantial boost thanks to new and expanded partnerships led by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service through its Urban Wildlife Conservation Program. This initiative connects city residents with nature and engages thousands of volunteers in restoring local environments. These programs were made possible by the 2016 Five Star grants from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.

News Release »»

Read More »»

Students from the Florida Atlantic University Pine Jog Environment Center help with native restoration at Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Ian Shive / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Young women explore the outdoors. Credit: Girls Inc. of Holyoke
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Announces Historic Partnership with Girls Inc. to Engage Young Women in Wildlife Conservation

July 27, 2016

Seeking to expand opportunities for young girls to experience nature and explore careers in wildlife conservation, the Service has signed a partnership agreement with Girls Inc. – a national organization that provides girls with life-changing experiences that inspire them to be strong, smart and bold. The agreement commits the two organizations to work together to develop education programs, hands-on conservation projects and training, and encourage young women to pursue careers in wildlife conservation and other science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields.

News Release »»

More information »»

Young women explore the outdoors. Credit: Girls Inc. of Holyoke
Higher Quality Version of Image

The students worked together to define climate issues and develop ideas to become climate resilient. Credit: Alejandro Morales / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service, Other Agencies Help Teens Tackle Climate Change at Inter-Tribal Youth Climate Leadership Congress

July 22, 2016

Nearly 100 Native American, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian students between the ages of 15 to 18, participated in the weeklong congress earlier this month to learn about climate change issues in indigenous communities, federal agency efforts on climate challenges, and most importantly, how the students can help their communities become more resilient in the face of these challenges.

Read More »»

The students worked together to define climate issues and develop ideas to become climate resilient. Credit: Alejandro Morales / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

The Refuge System includes four marine national monuments in the Pacific: Papahanaumokuakea, Pacific Remote Islands, Rose Atoll and Mariana Trench. Credit: Mark Sullivan / National Wildlife Refuge Association
Higher Quality Version of Image

A Beginner's Guide to the National Wildlife Refuge System

July 21, 2016

The lands and waters conserved by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service within the National Wildlife Refuge System are among the most picturesque natural places on Earth. Today, the National Wildlife Refuge System is beginning a series of weekly online stories that will use photos to highlight the conservation work and visitor opportunities within the Refuge System. The first story is designed to give veteran conservationists and newcomers alike a sense of what the Refuge System has become since its founding by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1903.

A Beginner's Guide to the National Wildlife Refuge System »»

Refuge System Homepage »»

Find a Refuge Near You »»

The Refuge System includes four marine national monuments in the Pacific: Papahanaumokuakea, Pacific Remote Islands, Rose Atoll and Mariana Trench. Credit: Mark Sullivan / National Wildlife Refuge Association
Higher Quality Version of Image

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell meets with Billy Frank Jr.'s eldest sister during the renaming ceremony. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Secretary Jewell Joins Tribes, Local Leaders to Celebrate Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge

July 21, 2016

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell joined federal, state, tribal and community leaders to celebrate the renaming of Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge in Washington state as the Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge, in honor of the late, internationally recognized Native American civil rights leader and Nisqually Tribal member. The ceremony also highlighted the newly established Medicine Creek Treaty National Memorial within the refuge.

News Release »»

More Photos »»

Blog about Billy Frank Jr. »»

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell meets with Billy Frank Jr.'s eldest sister during the renaming ceremony. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Members of the New Haven community get together at Cherry Ann St. Park in celebration of Latino Conservation Week. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Celebrating Latino Conservation Week

July 20, 2016

The Service is joining Hispanic Access Foundation in celebrating Latino Conservation Week, July 16-24, an annual demonstration of Latino commitment to conservation and the permanent protection of our land, water and air. Events across the nation will bring members of the Latino community together through outdoor recreation, environmental education, and conservation service projects.

Latino Conservation Week »»

Members of the New Haven community get together at Cherry Ann St. Park in celebration of Latino Conservation Week. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

The 2011 Lateral West wildfire at Great Dismal Swamp. Credit: Greg Sanders / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Reducing Impacts of Floods and Wildfires at Great Dismal Swamp

July 18, 2016

Floods and wildfires are natural occurrences in the forested wetlands of Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, on the border of Virginia and North Carolina. But these events have significant consequences on wildlife, habitats and nearby communities. While these events can’t be prevented entirely, their effects can be lessened. Work is now underway on a project to install, repair or replace 12 water control structures that will help refuge managers better regulate water levels for fire suppression, habitat management and flood risk to nearby communities. With the likelihood that floods and fires will increase under climate change, strategies like this one can help people and nature adapt to a changing world.

News Release »»

The 2011 Lateral West wildfire at Great Dismal Swamp. Credit: Greg Sanders / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

One man killed a wolf illegally in Canada. Credit: Higher Quality Version of Image

Facebook Posts Help Nab Poachers

July 14, 2016

Two Wisconsin men recently pleaded guilty to violating the Lacey Act by importing animals that had been killed illegally in Canada. Public Facebook posts by the two bragging about their successful hunting trips in Canada advanced the investigation. Here, and earlier in Canada, the men were sentenced to fines, loss of hunting privileges, community service, probation, forfeiture of trophies, and even brief incarceration.

Read More »»

One man killed a wolf illegally in Canada. Credit: Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Director Dan Ashe and LULAC National President Roger Rocha with attendees at the October 1, 2015, MOU signing. The Service has partnered with LULAC to promote conservation and natural resource management to Latinos. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service is a Proud Sponsor of the 2016 LULAC National Convention & Exposition in Washington, DC

July 14, 2016

The Service is working together with LULAC to increase participation by Latino families and kids in outdoor recreational activities and conservation.This partnership is an expression of our joint determination to strengthen the relationship of the Latino community in the United States to its natural heritage.

Read More »»

Service Director Dan Ashe and LULAC National President Roger Rocha with attendees at the October 1, 2015, MOU signing. The Service has partnered with LULAC to promote conservation and natural resource management to Latinos. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Young angler at Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Joanna Gilkeson / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Proposes Expansion of Hunting and Fishing Opportunities on National Wildlife Refuges

July 13, 2016

The value to Americans provided by national wildlife refuges was highlighted today when U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe announced the agency is proposing to expand hunting and fishing opportunities at 13 national wildlife refuges across the United States. This includes migratory bird, upland game, big game hunting and sport fishing. In addition, the proposal modifies existing refuge-specific regulations on more than 70 additional refuges and wetland management districts throughout the National Wildlife Refuge System.

News Release »»

Young angler at Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Joanna Gilkeson / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Ducks in flight at Bear River Watershed Conservation Area in Utah. Credit: Brian Ferguson / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Utah Family Land Donation Establishes Bear River Watershed Conservation Area

July 12, 2016

Today, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is accepting a 30-acre conservation easement donation west of Brigham City, Utah, from the Ferry Ranch and Farm family. Their contribution formally establishes the Bear River Watershed Conservation Area as the 565th national wildlife refuge. The Ferry family – John, Ben and Joel – are long-time landowners who are passionate about conserving the land, wildlife and resources for future generations. The area’s diverse landscapes support habitat for elk, pronghorn, numerous native fish species, such as Bonneville cutthroat trout and more than 200 species of birds.

News Release »»

Learn More »»

Ducks in flight at Bear River Watershed Conservation Area in Utah. Credit: Brian Ferguson / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Members Accepting Certificate of Appreciation from Phi Beta Sigma at Serious Summit 2016. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

The Phi Beta Sigma and Zeta Phi Beta Leadership Summits are in Full Swing and We're There!

July 12, 2016

This week, two leadership summits in Orlando, Fla., are bringing African Americans together to offer unique training and personal development opportunities. The Service is taking part in both – the Phi Beta Sigma fraternity Serious Summit and the Zeta Phi Beta sorority Grand Boulé – to help add a wildlife conservation dimension. The Service’s partnership with Phi Beta Sigma is the Agency’s first collaboration with a nationally historic African American organization and was followed by the development of last summer’s new partnership with sister sorority Zeta Phi Beta. These collaborations are helping open up the natural world and ideas of conservation stewardship to young people of color by showing them the wonders of nature and providing them with a sense of ownership over public lands. 

Learn More »»

Service Members Accepting Certificate of Appreciation from Phi Beta Sigma at Serious Summit 2016. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

More than 40 miles of the Mississippi River headwaters flow through the Camp Ripley Sentinel Landscape. Credit: Camp Ripley
Higher Quality Version of Image

Sentinel Landscapes Announced for Three U.S. Military Bases, Partnerships Preserve Wildlife and Support Military Readiness

July 12, 2016

The departments of Interior, Agriculture and Defense joined with state and other partners today to announce three new Sentinel Landscapes for Avon Park Air Force Range in Florida, Camp Ripley in Minnesota and military bases across eastern North Carolina. The partnerships target improved conservation of wildlife, working landscapes and military readiness. This year’s Sentinel Landscapes will help protect imperiled species such as the red-cockaded woodpecker, northern long-eared bat and Florida gopher tortoise. 

News Release »»

Learn More »»

More than 40 miles of the Mississippi River headwaters flow through the Camp Ripley Sentinel Landscape. Credit: Camp Ripley
Higher Quality Version of Image

Screenshot of the, "What You Can Do With Your African Elephant Ivory?" video. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Near-Total U.S. Ban on African Elephant Ivory Trade Goes into Effect; Guidance Available

July 6, 2016

A near-total ban on commercial trade of African elephant ivory goes into effect today, July 6, 2016, to help ensure U.S. domestic markets do not contribute to the decline of elephants in the wild. See links below to learn more about what you can do if you own ivory. 

Learn More »»

Video »»

Ivory Rule »»

Screenshot of the, "What You Can Do With Your African Elephant Ivory?" video. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Timber Theft Leads to 10 Months in Prison for Kentucky Man

June 26, 2016

Wildlife crime doesn’t always involve species from far-off countries. A Kentucky man was recently sentenced to 10 months in prison and ordered to pay $80,000 in restitution for illegally harvesting a stand of black walnut trees. The sentence “sends a serious message that we will not tolerate the profiteering of America's natural resource legacy,” said Edward Grace, the Service’s Deputy Assistant Director for Law Enforcement.

Read More »»

News Release (DOJ) »»