Looking for Something in Particular?

Date to Start Search: (dd/mm/yyyy)

Date to End Search: (dd/mm/yyyy)

Stories from the Home Page

Green sea turtle nesting at Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Blair Witherington / Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
Higher Quality Version of Image

Listing of Green Sea Turtles Points to Conservation Successes and Challenges in Recovering Species

April 5, 2016

NOAA Fisheries and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have reclassified green sea turtles, which occur globally, into 11 distinct population segments under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). All green sea turtles will remain protected under the ESA, and the revised listing will help ensure more effective conservation and recovery efforts. Due in part to the work of theFlorida Fish and Wildlife Commission, diverse stakeholders and special places like Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge, green sea turtles in Florida will now be listed as threatened instead of endangered.

News Release »»

Learn More »»

Green sea turtle nesting at Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Blair Witherington / Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
Higher Quality Version of Image

Generic tiger. Credit: Michael W. Dulaney / Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Strengthens Protections for Captive Tigers under the Endangered Species Act

April 5, 2016

In an effort to strengthen protections for certain captive tigers under the Endangered Species Act, the Service has finalized a rule declaring that anyone selling tigers across state lines must now first obtain an interstate commerce permit or register under the Captive-bred Wildlife Registration program. “Removing the loophole that enabled some tigers to be sold for purposes that do not benefit tigers in the wild will strengthen protections for these magnificent creatures and help reduce the trade in tigers that is so detrimental to wild populations,” said Service Director Dan Ashe. “This will be a positive driver for tiger conservation.”

News Release »»

FAQs »»

Generic tiger. Credit: Michael W. Dulaney / Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden
Higher Quality Version of Image

A little brown bat with symptoms typical of white-nose syndrome. Credit: Steve Taylor/University of Illinois
Higher Quality Version of Image

Bat Dies from White-nose Syndrome in Washington State

March 31, 2016

Scientists have confirmed white-nose syndrome in a little brown bat found near North Bend, Washington – the first recorded occurrence of this devastating bat disease in western North America. White-nose syndrome has killed more than 6 million bats in eastern North America since it was first documented nearly a decade ago. Bats benefit people by eating insects that can impact forest health and commercial crops, pollinating plants and more.

News Release »»

A little brown bat with symptoms typical of white-nose syndrome. Credit: Steve Taylor/University of Illinois
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Director Dan Ashe and National Wildlife Refuge System Chief Cynthia Martinez with Student Conservation Association high school community crew members. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Invests $1 million in John Heinz at Tinicum National Wildlife Refuge to Foster Education and Community Engagement

March 31, 2016

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today that the agency will invest $1 million annually at John Heinz at Tinicum National Wildlife Refuge in southwest Philadelphia, to continue engaging urban communities and youth in conservation and outdoor recreation at the refuge and nearby areas. Through close coordination with Audubon Pennsylvania and numerous other community groups, the Service has been working to close the gap between the area’s communities and green spaces to contribute to building a healthy, connected environment.

News Release »»

News Release (en Español) »»

Open Spaces Blog »»

Flickr »»

Service Director Dan Ashe and National Wildlife Refuge System Chief Cynthia Martinez with Student Conservation Association high school community crew members. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Ocelots require dense thornscrub habitat. Credit: Seth Patterson / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Where is the Best Place to See Wildlife?

March 25, 2016

USA TODAY 10 Best invites you to vote in three contests to pick the best places for seeing birds, wildlife in general and aquatic critters. In each contest, your national wildlife refuges and other public lands stand tall among the nominees. Voting ends Monday at noon ET.  

Open Spaces Blog »»

Ocelots require dense thornscrub habitat. Credit: Seth Patterson / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Dr. Benjamin Tuggle, Regional Director for the Service’s Southwest Region, releases an immature bald eagle inside of the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma’s Grey Snow Eagle House - an eagle aviary and rehabilitation facility partially funded by the Service's Tribal Wildlife Grants program. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Awards $5 Million in Grants to Support Tribal Wildlife Conservation Projects in 16 States

March 25, 2016

Native American and Alaska Native tribes in 16 states will benefit from nearly $5 million in grants provided by the Service's Tribal Wildlife Grants program. The awards will support 29 fish and wildlife conservation projects that assist a wide range of wildlife and habitat, including species of Native American cultural or traditional importance and species that are not hunted or fished. 

News Release »»

Learn More »»

Dr. Benjamin Tuggle, Regional Director for the Service’s Southwest Region, releases an immature bald eagle inside of the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma’s Grey Snow Eagle House - an eagle aviary and rehabilitation facility partially funded by the Service's Tribal Wildlife Grants program. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

USFWS Director Dan Ashe, USFWS Southwest Region Director Dr. Benjamin Tuggle and Senator Martin Heinrich at Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Jessie Jobs / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge Celebrates Conservation, Culture, and Community Receiving $1 Million to Expand Community Engagement

March 22, 2016

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe and U.S. Senator for New Mexico Martin Heinrich announced today that Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge will receive $1 million in additional annual funding through the Urban Wildlife Conservation Program to engage urban communities and youth in conservation and outdoor recreation. The refuge located only five miles from downtown Albuquerque, New Mexico, will offer opportunities to connect families and youth through conservation, culture and community. 

News Release »»

News Release (en Español) »»

Flickr »»

USFWS Director Dan Ashe, USFWS Southwest Region Director Dr. Benjamin Tuggle and Senator Martin Heinrich at Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Jessie Jobs / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Greater Sage-Grouse. Credit: Tom Koerner / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Distributes Nearly $50 Million to Support State Wildlife Conservation Projects

March 21, 2016

Species across the nation will benefit from almost $50 million in funding allocated to state wildlife agencies by the Service's State Wildlife Grants program. The program provides critical support for imperiled species and habitats listed in approved State Wildlife Action Plans. All 50 state and U.S. territorial wildlife agencies have such plans, which proactively protect species in greatest conservation need.  

News Release »»

Learn More »»

Greater Sage-Grouse. Credit: Tom Koerner / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Kemp's Ridley sea turtle hatchling. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Honors Conservation Leaders at Annual Science Awards Ceremony

March 18, 2016

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe announced the recipients of the 2015 Rachel Carson and Sam D. Hamilton Awards for scientific excellence at the North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference in Pittsburgh, PA. The awards honor Service employees and partners for their scientific contributions to improve the Service’s knowledge and management of fish and wildlife resources. 

News Release »»

Learn More »»

Kemp's Ridley sea turtle hatchling. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Skyway Marina (Formerly Glass City Marina) - Toledo, Ohio. Credit: Ohio DNR
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Allocates $14 Million to 32 States to Support Recreational Boating Communities

March 17, 2016

States and recreational boaters will benefit from nearly $14 million in grants distributed by the Service's Boating Infrastructure Grant (BIG) program. Grantees use BIG funds to construct, renovate and maintain marinas and other facilities that support outdoor recreation. Funding for the program comes from the Sport Fish Restoration and Boating Trust Fund, which boaters and manufacturers support through excise and other taxes on certain fishing and boating equipment and fuel.

News Release »»

Learn More »»

Skyway Marina (Formerly Glass City Marina) - Toledo, Ohio. Credit: Ohio DNR
Higher Quality Version of Image

Blackbeard Island, GA. Credit: Becky Skiba / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Updates Coastal Barrier Resources System Maps for Ten States

March 16, 2016

Final revised digital maps for all John H. Chafee Coastal Barrier Resources System units in Alabama, Georgia, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Ohio, Wisconsin, and the Great Lakes region of New York, plus 125 units in Florida and seven units in Louisiana are now available. The Service administers the maps under the Coastal Barrier Resources Act, which saves millions of taxpayer dollars by restricting Federal expenditures that encourage development in areas that are prone to hurricanes and other natural disasters. 

Bulletin »»

Learn More »»

Blackbeard Island, GA. Credit: Becky Skiba / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Habitat for the California tiger salamander was disturbed by the developer. Credit: John Cleckler / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Developer to Pay Millions in Endangered Species Act Case

March 15, 2016

California development company Wildlife Management LLC and its president, James Tong, were sentenced recently for securities fraud and violations of the Endangered Species Act. They will pay $1 million in restitution to groups that protect the environment. Tong was also ordered to provide a conservation easement valued at $3 million that permanently prohibits development on 107 acres. Developers must mitigate, or offset, a project's damage to protected species or their habitat. Wildlife Management tried to deceive regulators into believing it was mitigating when it had not. 

News Release (DOJ) »»

Habitat for the California tiger salamander was disturbed by the developer. Credit: John Cleckler / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Students can apply for a number of internships at the Patuxent Research Refuge. Pictured: An intern from the Student Conservation Association. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Happy Birthday, National Wildlife Refuge System! 113 Years of Conserving Nature, Serving Communities

March 11, 2016

The National Wildlife Refuge System, the world’s premier network of public lands devoted to wildlife conservation turns 113 on March 14. Refuges provide vital habitat for thousands of species and access to pastimes from fishing and hunting to nature watching, hiking, biking and boating. In an increasingly urban America, refuges also provide an important connection with the outdoors, particularly for young people. There is a refuge within an hour’s drive from most major metropolitan areas. Tell us your favorite refuge!

News Release »»

News Release (en Español) »»

Find a Refuge Trail »»

Students can apply for a number of internships at the Patuxent Research Refuge. Pictured: An intern from the Student Conservation Association. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Louisiana black bear. Credit: Pam McIlhenny, used with permission
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service and Partners Announce Delisting of the Louisiana Black Bear Due to Recovery

March 10, 2016

The Service celebrated another Endangered Species Act success today, this time for a famous bear of the South. Thanks to the efforts of states, private landowners, universities and non-profit organizations, the Louisiana black bear ­– inspiration for the teddy bear – has made a remarkable recovery since being listed in 1992. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell, state leaders and others made the announcement at the Tensas River National Wildlife Refuge in Louisiana.

News Release »»

Learn More »»

FAQs »»

Louisiana black bear. Credit: Pam McIlhenny, used with permission
Higher Quality Version of Image

Students from Oregon experienced Alaska’s rugged wilderness fishing in Kenai National Wildlife Refuge as part of a partnership between Soul River and Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Courtesy of Soul River Inc. Runs Wild
Higher Quality Version of Image

To Feel Healthier, Happier…Try Nature National Wildlife Refuges Spread the Word

March 9, 2016

Can nature enhance your health? There’s a strong case to be made that it can. Around the country, national wildlife refuges are reminding visitors that nature experiences can enhance health. And there’s a large and growing body of research behind it. Even small doses of nature can make a difference in the inner city. No matter where you live, you can enjoy nature at a refuge near you.

Bulletin »»

Find a Refuge Near You »»

Students from Oregon experienced Alaska’s rugged wilderness fishing in Kenai National Wildlife Refuge as part of a partnership between Soul River and Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Courtesy of Soul River Inc. Runs Wild
Higher Quality Version of Image