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The designation will help humpback whales and many other species. Credit: NOAA
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Service to Co-manage First Marine Monument in the Atlantic Ocean

September 15, 2016

On the heels of creating the world's largest protected area in the Pacific Ocean, President Obama today reaffirmed his commitment to marine conservation and protection by designating the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument, the first marine monument in the Atlantic Ocean. Permanently protecting these resources and reducing other threats to these ecosystems will provide a refuge for at-risk species such as deep sea corals, endangered whales and sea turtles and other species; improve ocean resilience in the face of climate change; and help sustain the ocean ecosystems and fishing economies for the long run.

News Release (DOI) »»

White House Fact Sheet »»

The designation will help humpback whales and many other species. Credit: NOAA
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From left to right, photo credits in parentheses: Karner blue butterfly (Joel Trick/USFWS), African elephant (Michelle Gadd/USFWS), Hawaiian monk seal at Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: James Watt
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Partnering with Google Cultural Institute Brings Endangered Species to Life

September 13, 2016

The Service presents more than 90 striking images and fascinating wildlife stories and facts on imperiled plant and animal species as part of the Google Cultural Institute’s Natural History Collection. The Service's contribution paints a picture of the threats facing plants and animals around the world while also highlighting the inspiring conservation work that is helping some of them recover.

Open Spaces Blog »»

Visit the Exhibit »»

From left to right, photo credits in parentheses: Karner blue butterfly (Joel Trick/USFWS), African elephant (Michelle Gadd/USFWS), Hawaiian monk seal at Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: James Watt
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Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell with the Service’s Northeast Regional Director Wendi Weber and Bob Martin, Commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Credit: USFWS
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Secretary Jewell Tours Hughesville Dam Removal in New Jersey

September 8, 2016

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell today joined Interior, state and local officials and partners at the Hughesville Dam removal on the Musconetcong River. Calling it a "model for collaborative conservation," Jewell joined a roundtable discussion with local partners and Service staff and toured the project work at the dam site, The dam removal is part of a larger collaborative effort to restore the 42-mile Musconetcong to a free-flowing state, which will open up fish passage while improving safety and flooding risks for the local community.

News Release »»

Learn More about Sandy Recovery »»

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell with the Service’s Northeast Regional Director Wendi Weber and Bob Martin, Commissioner of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Credit: USFWS
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Dr. Richard Bennett. Credit: USFWS
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White House Recognizes Service Scientist as Climate Change Champion

September 8, 2016

Dr. Richard Bennett, regional scientist for the Service’s Northeast Region, has been named 2016 GreenGov Presidential Awards Climate Champion for his leadership in Hurricane Sandy recovery. After devastation left by the 2012 storm, Bennett led the Department of the Interior response team, overseeing $167 million in funding for Service projects to help revitalize the Northeast and to protect it from future storms and sea-level rise.

News Release »»

Learn More about Sandy Recovery »»

GreenGov Presidential Awards Fact Sheet »»

Dr. Richard Bennett. Credit: USFWS
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Forested wetlands will be protected as part of the Albemarle/Chowan Wetland Conservation Initiative. Credit: G. Fleming / VA Department of Conservation and Recreation
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Migratory Bird Conservation Commission Approves $33 Million for Wetland Grants

September 7, 2016

The Migratory Bird Conservation Commission today approved $33.2 million in funding to conserve more than 81,000 acres of wetlands across the United States, protecting important habitats for waterfowl and other bird species. More than $21 million will be funded by North American Wetlands Conservation Act (NAWCA) grants to conserve more than 68,000 acres of wetlands and adjoining areas in 19 states. NAWCA is the only federal grant program dedicated to the conservation of wetland habitats for migratory birds.

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Forested wetlands will be protected as part of the Albemarle/Chowan Wetland Conservation Initiative. Credit: G. Fleming / VA Department of Conservation and Recreation
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President Barack Obama and Service employee Matt Brown at the Midway National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Official White House Photo by Pete Souza
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President Obama Visits Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge and Battle of Midway National Memorial

September 6, 2016

Shortly after announcing the expansion of the Papah?naumoku?kea Marine National Monument to become the world’s largest protected area, President Obama visited one of the national wildlife refuges that make up the monument.“This is going to be a precious resource for generations to come,” President Obama said, “Twenty years from now, 40 years from now, 100 years from now, this is a place where people can still come and see what a place like this looks like when its not overcrowded or destroyed by human populations.”

Blog from the Service’s Pacific Region »»

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President Barack Obama and Service employee Matt Brown at the Midway National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Official White House Photo by Pete Souza
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Planting trees can be a type of mitigation. Credit: USFWS
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Proposed Policy to Help Mitigate Impacts of Development on Imperiled Species

August 31, 2016

To help further protect endangered or threatened species and their habitats, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing a policy to effectively and sustainably offset adverse impacts of development activities to the nation’s most at-risk species and their habitats.

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Planting trees can be a type of mitigation. Credit: USFWS
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Pangolins, or scaly anteaters, are covered with overlapping scales made of keratin, the same protein that forms human hair and finger nails. Credit: Tikki Hywood Trust
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The Fight Against Wildlife Trafficking

August 31, 2016

Wildlife trafficking—the illegal taking and trade in protected species and their parts—continues to grow, threatening the future of many species of wildlife. The United States plays a key role in wildlife trafficking, as both consumer and transit country and a source of organized criminal networks. But it is also in the vanguard of efforts to end wildlife trafficking. The Service takes a leadership role combating wildlife trafficking both here and abroad.

Read More »»

Summer 2016 issue of Fish & Wildlife News »»

Pangolins, or scaly anteaters, are covered with overlapping scales made of keratin, the same protein that forms human hair and finger nails. Credit: Tikki Hywood Trust
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The waters around the islands and atolls of the northwestern Hawaiian chain – and the unique and abundant wildlife they support – will now receive broader protection thanks to the expansion of the Papah?naumoku?kea Marine National Monument. Credit: James Watt
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Expansion of Marine National Monument in Pacific by President Obama Creates World’s Largest Protected Area to be Co-Managed by Service

August 26, 2016

President Obama today announced the expansion of the Papah?naumoku?kea Marine National Monument to become the world’s largest protected area. More than 582,000 square miles of coral reefs, seamounts and undersea ridges and their wildlife will be safeguarded, an area greater than the size of Texas, California and Montana combined. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service now manages nearly 1 billion acres of lands and waters for wildlife, the largest conservation estate on the planet.

News Release (DOI) »»

The White House Fact Sheet »»

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The waters around the islands and atolls of the northwestern Hawaiian chain – and the unique and abundant wildlife they support – will now receive broader protection thanks to the expansion of the Papah?naumoku?kea Marine National Monument. Credit: James Watt
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Monarch butterfly. Credit: Joanna Gilkeson / USFWS
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$3.3M Goes to Projects to Support Monarch Butterflies

August 24, 2016

Monarch butterflies will get help throughout the nation, thanks to $3.3 million in grants from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation’s Monarch Butterfly Conservation Fund. The awards will support the restoration of approximately 16,000 acres of habitat in areas identified by experts as key to the recovery of monarch butterfly populations. The Service was awarded more than $1 million for projects in the Midwest.

News Release (NFWF) »»

Grants »»

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Monarch butterfly. Credit: Joanna Gilkeson / USFWS
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Paul Rauch. Credit: USFWS
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Paul Rauch to Lead Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program

August 24, 2016

Paul Rauch has been named the Service’s new Assistant Director for Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration (WSFR). Rauch, a career Service employee of more than two decades, has served as WSFR’s Acting Assistant Director since April. Rauch will oversee grant programs that provide more than $1 billion annually to states, territories and federally recognized Indian tribes to support on-the-ground wildlife and fisheries conservation. 

News Release »»

Paul Rauch. Credit: USFWS
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Service Director Dan Ashe and other Service officials with members of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity and their Sigma Beta youth club. Credit: USFWS
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Sigmas Visit Department of the Interior, Service Offices

August 19, 2016

Service Director Dan Ashe and other officials recently welcomed members of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity and their Sigma Beta youth club to the Department of the Interior. The group not only toured parts of the historic building but also met with Service officials. The visit by the Tau Iota Sigma Chapter from Memphis, Tennessee, and their Sigma Betas marked the first chapter visit to the building.

Director Blogs on Work with Sigma »»

Service Director Dan Ashe and other Service officials with members of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity and their Sigma Beta youth club. Credit: USFWS
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Kendra Chan. Credit: USFWS
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Summer Fellowship Student Flexing Her Mussels

August 19, 2016

Often overlooked, freshwater mussels are among the more understudied yet ecologically important organisms in aquatic ecosystems.  They are getting some much needed conservation assistance from Kendra Chan, a 2016 Directorate Fellow assigned to the Pacific Region’s Fish and Aquatic Conservation Office. 

Learn More About Kendra and Her Project »»

For Information on the Directorate Fellows Program »»

Kendra Chan. Credit: USFWS
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Snowy Egrets at J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: USFWS Credit: USFWS
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Join us in Celebrating the Landmark Migratory Bird Treaty Centennial

August 16, 2016

One hundred years ago, the first Migratory Bird Treaty was signed between the United States and Canada, marking an historic moment in international wildlife conservation. Today, the two nations celebrate the monumental success of this agreement in bringing many birds back from the brink. The treaty provided a model for similar agreements with other nations and paved the way for regulations that continue to protect birds and their habitats today in the face of many new challenges. Learn more about how you can help celebrate, enjoy and protect our winged friends. 

News Release »»

Migratory Bird Treaty Centennial »»

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Snowy Egrets at J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: USFWS Credit: USFWS
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Island Fox Recovery video. Credit: USFWS Credit: USFWS
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Foxes on Three California Islands Saved from Extinction in Record Time Thanks to Conservation Partnership

August 11, 2016

Foxes that are unique to three Channel Islands off the southern coast of California went into the record books today having achieved the fastest-ever recovery of a mammal in the history of the Endangered Species Act. The three subspecies of Channel Island fox were declared saved from extinction today following a collaborative conservation effort spanning 12 years. 

News Release (DOJ) »»

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Island Fox Recovery video. Credit: USFWS Credit: USFWS
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