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Stories from the Home Page

Adult bald eagle, known as Valor II, on the nest with two eaglets. Credit: Photo courtesy of Stewards of Upper Mississippi River Refuge Credit: Courtesy of Stewards of Upper Mississippi River Refuge
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We are Family: Eagle Trio Sees Parenting Success in Illinois

April 30, 2018

Male eagles Valor I and Valor II, and female newcomer Starr, are raising an eaglet along the Mississippi River in Illinois. For several years, fans have been watching this family at Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge through a webcam as the eagles deal with the trials and tribulations of parenting. Having more than two birds assist with feeding and rearing young isn't all that uncommon, but these two males seem to prefer the teamwork approach.

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Adult bald eagle, known as Valor II, on the nest with two eaglets. Credit: Photo courtesy of Stewards of Upper Mississippi River Refuge Credit: Courtesy of Stewards of Upper Mississippi River Refuge
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Green-winged teal. Credit: Peter Pearsall/USFWS
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Secretary Zinke Announces Grants to Boost to Wetland, Waterfowl Conservation, Access to Public Lands

April 25, 2018

The Migratory Bird Conservation Commission, chaired by U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke, approved $24.6 million in grants for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners to conserve, enhance or restore more than 176,000 acres of lands for waterfowl, shorebirds and other birds in 18 states. The commission also approved more than $9.8 million from the Migratory Bird Conservation Fund to conserve 5,628 acres on national wildlife refuges and open thousands of additional acres for public hunting and recreational access.

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Green-winged teal. Credit: Peter Pearsall/USFWS
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White-tailed deer. Credit: Photo courtesy of Steve Gifford

Service Law Enforcement Helps Deer Stay Healthy

April 24, 2018

To combat chronic wasting disease, a 100-percent fatal disease affecting deer species, many states restrict importation of live deer. Service special agents and state law enforcement professionals work to uphold those laws, protecting wild populations from the disease. A recent operation resulted in the sentencing of two men for illegally transporting deer into Alabama. One was fined nearly $1 million.

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White-tailed deer. Credit: Photo courtesy of Steve Gifford

More than 2,000 organizations from around the world highlight the importance of open rivers and migratory fish conservation. Credit: Jason Ching / World Fish Migration Foundation
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Service Joins More Than 2000 Organizations Celebrating World Fish Migration Day

April 20, 2018

A global initiative highlighting the importance of conserving migratory fish species and aquatic ecosystems, World Fish Migration Day 2018 will be celebrated April 21. More than 520 worldwide events will be held in 62 countries, including nearly 100 events in the United States ranging from global inaugurations of "fishways" that help migratory fish bypass water infrastructure, dam removal to family educational events, kayak tours and river cleanup activities??.

WFMD 2018 News Release »»

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More than 2,000 organizations from around the world highlight the importance of open rivers and migratory fish conservation. Credit: Jason Ching / World Fish Migration Foundation
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The winning 2018 Junior Duck Stamp art, an acrylic painting of an emperor goose by Rayen Kang. Credit: USFWS

Interior and Service Announce Winner of National Junior Duck Stamp Art Contest

April 20, 2018

Rayen Kang, an 18-year-old from Johns Creek, Georgia, took top honors at the National Junior Duck Stamp Art Contest with her acrylic rendition of an emperor goose. Her artwork will grace the 2018-2019 Junior Duck Stamp, which will go on sale June 29 and supports conservation education for students in kindergarten through 12th grade.

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The winning 2018 Junior Duck Stamp art, an acrylic painting of an emperor goose by Rayen Kang. Credit: USFWS

Migratory birds take to the skies after being uncaged at Everglades National Park. The birds had been seized as part of Operation Ornery Birds. Credit: Dan Chapman/USFWS
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Birds Seized in Operation Ornery Birds Released into the Everglades

April 18, 2018

After a long-running, undercover investigation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials and partners released about 130 birds, including painted buntings and northern cardinals, into Florida’s River of Grass last week. The birds had been bought by undercover agents from illegal trappers and traffickers, and seized in a series of arrests in the days leading up to the release.

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Six People Charged (DOJ) »»

Migratory birds take to the skies after being uncaged at Everglades National Park. The birds had been seized as part of Operation Ornery Birds. Credit: Dan Chapman/USFWS
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Chuda Dhaurali holds a buckling at Pine Island Community Farm in Colchester, Vermont. Credit: Paul E. Richardson/Vermont Land Trust
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Nature's Good Neighbors: A New American Dream

April 18, 2018

A Vermont farm gives back to the local community and the land, and proves that it's possible to make a living on the land while looking after it, such as protecting local wetlands. 

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Nature's Good Neighbors Stories »»

Chuda Dhaurali holds a buckling at Pine Island Community Farm in Colchester, Vermont. Credit: Paul E. Richardson/Vermont Land Trust
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Volunteer Jim Montgomery collects waterbird data. Credit: USFWS
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Volunteers Keep Things Running

April 18, 2018

The Service has some stellar volunteers -- the 40,000-plus people who contribute more than 1.5 million hours of work each year to help achieve the agency's mission and many of our staffers, who give back to their local communities in some amazing ways. 

Blog: Thank You to Volunteers Everywhere »»

Photo Gallery of FWS Employees who Volunteer »»

Volunteer Jim Montgomery collects waterbird data. Credit: USFWS
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Southern Arizona citizens installed bat feeders in their back yards to help recover lesser long-nosed bats and share scientific data. Credit: Courtesy of Richard Spitzer.
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Good News for Agave: Plant Pollinating Bat No Longer Endangered

April 17, 2018

Thanks to three decades of partnerships between the Service and diverse stakeholders on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border, the lesser long-nosed bat has rebounded from near-extinction and no longer requires Endangered Species Act protection. Agave growers, tequila producers, private landowners, wildlife agencies and citizen scientists all pitched in to conserve and restore this unique pollinator.

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Southern Arizona citizens installed bat feeders in their back yards to help recover lesser long-nosed bats and share scientific data. Credit: Courtesy of Richard Spitzer.
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Sporting a namesake black cap and white face mask, the black-capped vireo is the smallest member of the vireo family. This bird occurs regularly in the United States and winters exclusively in Mexico along the Pacific Coast. Credit: Gil Eckrich
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Black-Capped Vireo Soars to Recovery Thanks to Conservation Partnerships; Service Delists the Songbird from ESA

April 13, 2018

Not so long ago the black-capped vireo nearly went extinct. Goats ate their way through this songbird’s habitat and brown-headed cowbirds commandeered their nests. In the late 1980s there were only about 350 birds known to exist, but thanks to robust conservation efforts, the vireo is being removed from the list of endangered and threatened species.

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Sporting a namesake black cap and white face mask, the black-capped vireo is the smallest member of the vireo family. This bird occurs regularly in the United States and winters exclusively in Mexico along the Pacific Coast. Credit: Gil Eckrich
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Male Kirtland's Warbler from Adams county, Wisconsin. Credit: Joel Trick/USFWS
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Service and Partners Celebrate Remarkable Conservation Victory of Once Critically Imperiled Songbird

April 11, 2018

In the early 1970s, the Kirtland's warbler seemed to be rapidly heading towards extinction. But after decades of partnership efforts among federal and state agencies, industry and conservation groups, the population of this songbird has rebounded, and the Service is now proposing to remove it from the list of endangered and threatened species.

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Male Kirtland's Warbler from Adams county, Wisconsin. Credit: Joel Trick/USFWS
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Dave Murphy plants a native tree on his farm. Credit: Kelly O'Mara/Ozark Regional Land Trust
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Nature's Good Neighbors: For this Missouri Bat Ambassador, Conservation Begins at Home

April 11, 2018

The commissioner of the Missouri Department of Conservation manages his farm in a way that both enhances its economic value and provides a quality home for the endangered Indiana bat and other wildlife.

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Nature's Good Neighbors Stories »»

Dave Murphy plants a native tree on his farm. Credit: Kelly O'Mara/Ozark Regional Land Trust
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Jane Koger inspects her ranch in her Polaris Ranger. Credit: Greg Kramos/USFWS
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Nature's Good Neighbors: All About the Tallgrass

April 6, 2018

Rancher Jane Koger makes her living running a cow-calf operation in the Flint Hills of Kansas. Through experimentation, education and relationships, she has learned that improving habitat for wildlife also helps her bottom line.

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Nature's Good Neighbors Stories »»

Jane Koger inspects her ranch in her Polaris Ranger. Credit: Greg Kramos/USFWS
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Thousands of invasive silver carp were removed from Creve Coeur Lake. Credit: Photo courtesy of Missouri Department of Conservation.
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Herding Asian carp in St. Louis, Missouri

April 4, 2018

We've heard of herding cats, but fish? In a recent fishing exercise at Creve Coeur Lake, our biologists worked with the Missouri Department of Conservation, U.S. Geological Survey and the St. Louis County Parks Department to remove 47,000 Asian carp from the lake. Partners used a Chinese "fish herding" technique to capture thousands of these unwanted fish.

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A War in the Water as Asian Carp Threaten Southeast »»

Thousands of invasive silver carp were removed from Creve Coeur Lake. Credit: Photo courtesy of Missouri Department of Conservation.
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Landowner David Spicer with Partners for Fish and Wildlife biologist Christiana Manville. Credit: Joe Milmoe/USFWS
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Nature's Good Neighbors: Restoring Habitat and Reviving the Local Economy

April 2, 2018

Landowner David Spicer decided to help the Amargosa toad, a species unique to the Oasis Valley of Nevada, where he lives. As he worked on toad conservation, he also made his ranch a place for outdoor enthusiasts to enjoy the natural world. And his tourism plans aren't complete.

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Nature's Good Neighbors Stories »»

Landowner David Spicer with Partners for Fish and Wildlife biologist Christiana Manville. Credit: Joe Milmoe/USFWS
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