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Stories from the Home Page

Video thumbnail: Conservation Begins With Hello Credit: USFWS
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Refuge Law Enforcement Officers Have Alaska at Hello

August 21, 2017

In Alaska, where many depend on fishing and hunting for their next meal, wildlife officers face the task of clearly explaining why following the rules is a good thing. Along the remote Yukon and Kuskokwim rivers of Western Alaska, that means saying hello – engaging with the local communities – so the brown uniform of the Fish and Wildlife Service is seen not as a threat but as a friendly partner.

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Video thumbnail: Conservation Begins With Hello Credit: USFWS
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Desert tortoises rely on native forbs for the food and water needed for survival. They can store enough water to go without a drink for a year. Credit: USFWS
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Invasive Grasses Choking Desert Tortoise

August 18, 2017

Threatened desert tortoises are dying at alarming rates, primarily due to invasive species of grass, especially red brome and cheatgrass. Foreign to the Mojave Desert, these grasses are not as nutritious to tortoises as their normal forage. The invaders can also get lodged in a tortoise’s mouth. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Bureau of Land Management and the National Park Service, are working to defend the tortoise and its Mojave Desert home.

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Desert tortoises rely on native forbs for the food and water needed for survival. They can store enough water to go without a drink for a year. Credit: USFWS
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Youngsters at Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge Salmon Camp get ready to go fishing. Credit: Lisa Hupp/USFWS
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Salmon Stories from Kodiak, Alaska

August 18, 2017

Easily accessible and only four miles from downtown, the Buskin River offers some of the earliest subsistence and sport fishing opportunities for Kodiak residents and visitors. Filling the freezer with Buskin River reds (sockeye) is part of early summer life, and a tradition for many. The river is a backyard treasure that nourishes the Kodiak community throughout the year.

Read How the Service is Supporting this Important Fishery »»

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Summer of Fishing »»

Youngsters at Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge Salmon Camp get ready to go fishing. Credit: Lisa Hupp/USFWS
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A State Wildlife Grant is helping protect the rare frosted elfin butterfly. Credit: Jennifer Selfridge, Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources
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Tribal, State Wildlife Conservation Projects Bolstered by $52 Million in Funding

August 15, 2017

The Service is providing more than $52 million in funding to Native American tribes and state wildlife agencies through the Tribal Wildlife Grant (TWG) program and the State Wildlife Grants (SWG) program. The funds give critical support for a diverse array of species and habitats across the country. Under the SWG program, more than $48 million will support imperiled species and habitats listed in approved state wildlife action plans. More than $4 million in TWG funds to Native American and Alaska Native tribes in 14 states will support fish and wildlife conservation and key partnerships.

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Learn More about State Wildlife Grant Program »»

Learn More about Tribal Wildlife Grant Program »»

A State Wildlife Grant is helping protect the rare frosted elfin butterfly. Credit: Jennifer Selfridge, Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources
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Kids try their hands at fishing during an I’m Hooked event at Haag Lake in Oregon. Credit: Pat Stark/USFWS
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How a Simple First Cast Can Lead to a Lifetime of Angling

August 11, 2017

Urban national wildlife refuges in the Portland-Vancouver area of the Pacific Northwest work with partners to give a child from a city setting an idea about what is out there beyond buildings and businesses, roads and rail yards – nature and the outdoors. A big part of that is fishing.

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Summer of Fishing »»

Kids try their hands at fishing during an I’m Hooked event at Haag Lake in Oregon. Credit: Pat Stark/USFWS
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Partners participate in a youth waterfowl hunt at Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Courtesy of Tony Rocheford
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Secretary Zinke Proposes Expansion of Hunting and Fishing Opportunities at 10 National Wildlife Refuges

August 9, 2017

In his latest effort to increase access to hunting and fishing on public lands and waters, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke today announced a proposal to open or expand opportunities at 10 national wildlife refuges. If finalized, this would bring the number of refuges where the public may hunt up to 373, and up to 312 where fishing would be permitted.

News Release »»

Partners participate in a youth waterfowl hunt at Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Courtesy of Tony Rocheford
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Protect Pollinators stamps are issued in a pane of 20, with four stamps of each design. Credit: courtesy of U.S. Postal Service
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Postal Service Protects Pollinators

August 7, 2017

The U.S. Postal Service is celebrating pollinators and their tremendous value to our ecosystems and economies with a set of five forever stamps with the theme Protect Pollinators. The stamps, issued in a pane of 20, depict the monarch butterfly and western honeybee.

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Protect Pollinators stamps are issued in a pane of 20, with four stamps of each design. Credit: courtesy of U.S. Postal Service
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For most of their life, kokanee are silver, with a blue or silver back and small dark spots along the back and the tail. But spawning fish undergo a remarkable transformation; their body turns bright red and their head a dark green. Credit: Roger Tabor/USFWS
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The 'Little Red Fish' with a Big Tale to Tell

August 4, 2017

Once an important part of the ecology of the Lake Sammamish watershed in western Washington and an important resource to area tribes and anglers, kokanee salmon in the Pacific Northwest are now limited to only two native populations. These "land locked" sockeye salmon don't migrate to the ocean like most salmon species but spend their entire life cycle in freshwater. Using a unique outreach tool – the Kokanee Quest – the Service and many partners are engaging people to conserve the fish.

Read more about the "little red fish" »»

Summer of Fishing »»

For most of their life, kokanee are silver, with a blue or silver back and small dark spots along the back and the tail. But spawning fish undergo a remarkable transformation; their body turns bright red and their head a dark green. Credit: Roger Tabor/USFWS
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Federal Canine Officer Darryn Witt and Rudi. Credit: Photo courtesy Darryn Witt
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Service Retiree Gets New Job on Cattle Ranch

August 3, 2017

When 10-year-old K-9 Rudi, a longtime Service employee, was set to retire, Federal Canine Officer Darryn Witt began to search for the perfect situation for the Belgian malinois, who had been his partner for eight years on the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge. Rudi is now settling in at the 200-acre Rocking W cattle ranch in Cooper, Texas, whose owner wanted a working dog and companion.

Open Spaces Blog »»

Federal Canine Officer Darryn Witt and Rudi. Credit: Photo courtesy Darryn Witt
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National wildlife refuges in the prime viewing area for the August 21 solar eclipse. Credit: Liz Cruz / USFWS
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Total Solar Eclipse and Wildlife: More than a Dozen Wildlife Refuges in the Path

August 2, 2017

What does wildlife do in near total darkness when it comes during daytime hours? You can find out. More than a dozen national wildlife refuges are in the “path of totality” during the August 21 total solar eclipse, the first in the United States since 1979. The blackout will last less than three minutes ? and you can be part of the excitement… and the science.

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Open Spaces Blog »»

National wildlife refuges in the prime viewing area for the August 21 solar eclipse. Credit: Liz Cruz / USFWS
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All national fish hatcheries have live animals on site, such as this young lake trout at Iron River National Fish Hatchery in Wisconsin. Credit: Mallory Mackey / USFW
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Calling All Road-trippers Looking for Adventure!

August 1, 2017

National fish hatcheries play an important role in preserving America's fishing heritage. Hatcheries produce game fish such as lake trout that are stocked into parts of the Great Lakes. They also rear such endangered fish as the Topeka shiner and other freshwater animals, such as native mussels, to help support species recovery and healthy aquatic ecosystems. Best of all, your national fish hatcheries are open to visitors. Come out and learn more about our work.

National Fish Hatcheries in the Midwest Offer Fun »»

Find a Fish Hatchery Near You »»

Summer of Fishing »»

All national fish hatcheries have live animals on site, such as this young lake trout at Iron River National Fish Hatchery in Wisconsin. Credit: Mallory Mackey / USFW
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Video thumbnail: Want to help wildlife? There's an app for that! Click image to view. Credit: USFWS
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Anglers Support Species Recovery

August 1, 2017

Since 2015, FishBrain, makers of the popular smartphone app for anglers, has been partnering with the Service to build and deploy a component to their app that allows users to log up to 50 sightings a day of species listed under the Endangered Species Act. This crowd-sourced data from fishing holes around the country helps scientists and others better conserve imperiled wildlife.

Read the story »»

Summer of Fishing »»

Video thumbnail: Want to help wildlife? There's an app for that! Click image to view. Credit: USFWS
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For nearly eight weeks from April to June this year, hundreds of Service employees from across the country helped manage the West Mims Fire at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in Georgia. Credit: Mark Davis / USFWS
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The Makings of an American Hero

July 28, 2017

As we celebrate American heroes this week, Greg Sheehan, Acting Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, points out just a few of the heroes all around the Service.

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For nearly eight weeks from April to June this year, hundreds of Service employees from across the country helped manage the West Mims Fire at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in Georgia. Credit: Mark Davis / USFWS
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Lock and dam on the Mississippi River. Credit: USFWS
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Heroes on the Mighty Mississippi River

July 26, 2017

On July 3, at Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge, Federal Wildlife Officers Dan Shamhart and John Below saved a man and son who were floating down the Mississippi River, north of Dubuque, Iowa, toward a dam with multiple roller gates and very turbulent, high-velocity water. Without swift action, the two would have likely drowned. The man said his son jumped in after a toy he had dropped into the river. The man then went after his son. Fortunately, both had life vests.

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Lock and dam on the Mississippi River. Credit: USFWS
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Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge is known for its bison (pictured), elk and wild turkey and a choice of camping options. Credit: Courtesy of A. Forrest.
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Campsites or Cabins? Find Camping Variety on National Wildlife Refuges

July 25, 2017

Ready to fall asleep under a sky filled with stars? Raring to ditch the fast-moving, competitive world for unspoiled nature — at least for a few days? Maybe now's the time to get away, go camping and be captivated by the nation's national wildlife refuges.

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Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge is known for its bison (pictured), elk and wild turkey and a choice of camping options. Credit: Courtesy of A. Forrest.
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