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Stories from the Home Page

#RecreateResponsibly. Credit: Sara Wolman/USFWS
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Recreate Responsibly on National Wildlife Refuges

July 9, 2020

National wildlife refuges have become popular “close-to-home” destinations to enjoy outdoor recreation during the COVID pandemic. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service needs your help to ensure the safety of our visitors — both human and wild.

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#RecreateResponsibly. Credit: Sara Wolman/USFWS
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Foothill yellow-legged frogs were listed as endangered along the South Coast and most of the Sierra Nevada foothills, and threatened in the Feather River drainage under the California Endangered Species Act earlier this year. Credit: Rebecca Fabbri/USFWS
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Partnership Results in First Release of 115 Zoo-reared Foothill Yellow-legged Frogs

July 6, 2020

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently joined a partnership of state and federal agencies, a zoo, businesses and a biologist, all dedicated to the conservation of the at-risk foothill yellow-legged frog. We were proud to be among the partners on June 30, releasing 115 foothill yellow-legged frogs along the Feather River in Plumas National Forest in California.

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Foothill yellow-legged frogs were listed as endangered along the South Coast and most of the Sierra Nevada foothills, and threatened in the Feather River drainage under the California Endangered Species Act earlier this year. Credit: Rebecca Fabbri/USFWS
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Pictured from left to right: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Aurelia Skipwith, U.S. Secretary of the Interior David L. Bernhardt and Deputy Secretary of the Interior Katharine MacGregor. Credit: Tami Heilemann/DOI
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Service Debuts 2020-2021 Federal Duck Stamp and Junior Duck Stamp

June 26, 2020

U.S. Secretary of the Interior David L. Bernhardt, Deputy Secretary of the Interior Katharine MacGregor and Service Director Aurelia Skipwith kicked off the first day of sale for the new 2020-2021 Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp – commonly known as the Duck Stamp – by purchasing the first stamps today at Interior’s Washington headquarters. The new Duck Stamp and its younger sibling, the Junior Duck Stamp, are now available for purchase by hunters, birders, stamp collectors and others at official locations across the country and online.

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Pictured from left to right: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Aurelia Skipwith, U.S. Secretary of the Interior David L. Bernhardt and Deputy Secretary of the Interior Katharine MacGregor. Credit: Tami Heilemann/DOI
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Monarch butterfly and bumblebee on swamp milkweed in Michigan. Credit: Jim Hudgins/USFWS
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Our Future Flies with Pollinators

June 25, 2020

With the country celebrating Pollinator Week, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reiterates its commitment to conserving pollinators, which play a part in producing one out of every three bites of food consumed including berries, melons, apples, tomatoes, pumpkins, potatoes, almonds, spices, coffee and chocolate. Pollinators help produce approximately $40 billion worth of products around the world each year.

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Secretary Bernhardt’s Pollinator Week Proclamation »»

Monarch butterfly and bumblebee on swamp milkweed in Michigan. Credit: Jim Hudgins/USFWS
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Boating Infrastructure Grant dollars at work on the Mississippi River. Credit: Mara Koenig/USFWS
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More Than $54 Million in Grants Will Help Keep Waters Clean, Support Outdoor Recreation

June 19, 2020

The Secretary of the Interior today announced $32.8 million in grants – with an additional non-federal match of $22 million – for states and communities to support outdoor recreation and help boaters keep America’s waters clean. The funding comes from the Clean Vessel Act program and the Boating Infrastructure Grant program, both of which provide much-needed funding to communities.

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Learn More about the Clean Vessel Act Grant Program »»

Learn More about the Boating Infrastructure Grant Program »»

Boating Infrastructure Grant dollars at work on the Mississippi River. Credit: Mara Koenig/USFWS
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Western grebes perform their water ballet at Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge in Utah. Credit: Wayne Watson/USFWS
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Summer Sights on National Wildlife Refuges

June 17, 2020

The sun is high. The day is long. And there’s lots to see in summer at national wildlife refuges. Sea turtles are nesting. Tule elk are bugling. Dragonflies are staging crazy aerial displays. And so much more.

What to Look for and Where »»

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Western grebes perform their water ballet at Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge in Utah. Credit: Wayne Watson/USFWS
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Crystal Leonetti is the Alaska Native Affairs Specialist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Alaska. Credit: Lisa Hupp/USFWS
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Healing from the Inside Out

June 15, 2020

As the first Indigenous woman to ever serve as a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Native American liaison, the Alaska Region’s Crystal Leonetti helps make her colleagues aware. “So many of the mistakes we’ve made in our history are from not knowing.”

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Conservation History Journal: Women in Conservation »»

Crystal Leonetti is the Alaska Native Affairs Specialist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Alaska. Credit: Lisa Hupp/USFWS
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Thumnail of the Video: Dream Job. Click image to view video. Credit: USFWS
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Kayak Surveys Provide Important Data for Fish Habitat

June 12, 2020

Imagine taking a kayak out on the water all day as a full-time job. That’s exactly what the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees from the Red Bluff office in California do for a portion of the year. The work is critical for surveying Clear Creek for the presence of steelhead, rainbow trout and late-fall Chinook salmon nests known as redds.

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Thumnail of the Video: Dream Job. Click image to view video. Credit: USFWS
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The Borax Lake chub can be found in water with temperatures up to 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Credit: USFWS
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Partnerships Enable Recovery of Borax Lake Chub

June 11, 2020

Thanks to the enduring and successful conservation efforts of federal, state and local partners, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has removed the Borax Lake chub from Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection. Threats to Borax Lake and its namesake chub have been eliminated or greatly reduced, and the fish no longer meets the ESA definition of an endangered or threatened species.

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More About the Recovery »»

The Borax Lake chub can be found in water with temperatures up to 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Credit: USFWS
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Golden-cheeked warbler. Credit: Steve Maslowski/USFWS
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Service Solicits Comments on a Draft Environmental Impact Statement on Proposed Migratory Bird Treaty Act Regulatory Changes

June 5, 2020

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has made available a draft Environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act. This action is a required next step for the Service in its regulatory undertaking to define the scope of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act to provide regulatory certainty to the public, industries, states, tribes and other stakeholders.

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Golden-cheeked warbler. Credit: Steve Maslowski/USFWS
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Double-crested cormorant. Credit: USFWS
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Service Proposes Rule on Cormorant Management

June 5, 2020

Today, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing a proposed rule and associated draft environmental impact statement to responsibly manage conflicts associated with double-crested cormorants in the United States. This is the latest in a series of actions the Service is taking regarding cormorant populations under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

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Double-crested cormorant. Credit: USFWS
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Species like the Brewer's sparrow will benefit from conservation projects funded by the Neotropical MigratoCredit: Tom Koerner/USFWS Credit: Tom Koerner/USFWS
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Migratory Birds to Benefit from $25 Million in Federal and Matching Funding Throughout the Americas

June 1, 2020

Twenty years ago, the passage of the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act spurred new opportunities for innovation in bird conservation that continue today. This year, birds and people throughout the Americas will benefit from more than $4.8 million in federal funds matched by more than $21 million in partner contributions going to 34 collaborative conservation projects in 20 countries.

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Species like the Brewer's sparrow will benefit from conservation projects funded by the Neotropical MigratoCredit: Tom Koerner/USFWS Credit: Tom Koerner/USFWS
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Species like the Brewer's sparrow will benefit from conservation projects funded by the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act. Credit: Tom Koerner/USFWS
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Migratory Birds to Benefit from $25 Million in Federal and Matching Funding Throughout the Americas

June 1, 2020

Twenty years ago, the passage of the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act spurred new opportunities for innovation in bird conservation that continue today. This year, birds and people throughout the Americas will benefit from more than $4.8 million in federal funds matched by more than $21 million in partner contributions going to 34 collaborative conservation projects in 20 countries.

News Release »»

Learn More »»

Species like the Brewer's sparrow will benefit from conservation projects funded by the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act. Credit: Tom Koerner/USFWS
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The Prairie Pothole region is dotted with wetlands of all sizes, and is known as America's duck factory because it supports the majority of North America’s breeding ducks. Credit: USFWS
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Talk on the Wild Side Podcast Celebrates Wetlands

May 29, 2020

In celebration of the importance of wetlands, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service created our first-ever national podcast dedicated exclusively to wetlands and all they do for people, plants and animals. It’s not just about the benefits that wetlands provide to all Americans, but the people that dedicate themselves to conserving wetlands and the species that depend on them, as well as 21st century threats and innovative conservation solutions.

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Transcript »»

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The Prairie Pothole region is dotted with wetlands of all sizes, and is known as America's duck factory because it supports the majority of North America’s breeding ducks. Credit: USFWS
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Migratory bird species like the Northern pintail will benefit from wetland conservation projects funded by the North American Wetlands Conservation Act. Credit: Tom Koerner/USFWS
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More than $160 Million in Funding will Benefit Wetland Conservation Projects and National Wildlife Refuges

May 28, 2020

The Migratory Bird Conservation Commission, chaired by Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt, approved $22.1 million in grants for the Service and its partners to conserve, enhance or restore more than 160,000 acres of lands for waterfowl, shorebirds and other birds in 22 states. An additional $40.5 million will benefit 19 projects in Canada and Mexico through the North American Wetlands Conservation Act. The commission also approved $47.1 million from the Migratory Bird Conservation Fund to conserve 21,259 acres for six national wildlife refuges.

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Migratory bird species like the Northern pintail will benefit from wetland conservation projects funded by the North American Wetlands Conservation Act. Credit: Tom Koerner/USFWS
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