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Alewife is one species of river herring that spawned in the Presumpscot River historically. Credit: Will Parson/Chesapeake Bay Program
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Rallying ‘Round the Presumpscot

January 26, 2021

Restoring fish passage is nothing out of the ordinary for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Since 2009, we’ve removed more than 750 stream barriers throughout the Northeast alone, opening 7,350 river miles and 44,500 acres of wetland habitat. Thanks to a recent project in Maine, nearly complete, migratory fish have access to five more miles of the Presumpscot River…and the community benefits as well.

A Decades-long Endeavor »»

Alewife is one species of river herring that spawned in the Presumpscot River historically. Credit: Will Parson/Chesapeake Bay Program
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A male Chinook salmon, with red coloration, strikes another male Chinook on Clear Creek in Redding, California, during spawning season in October. Credit: Brandon Honig/USFWS Credit: Brandon Honig/USFWS
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Restoration Brings Salmon, People Back to Clear Creek

January 19, 2021

Along with partners, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been working at California’s Clear Creek for decades. The project has paid off, and the area now attracts “families utilizing the area, swimming with kids, fishing, mountain biking, hiking with dogs.”

Read the full story »»

A male Chinook salmon, with red coloration, strikes another male Chinook on Clear Creek in Redding, California, during spawning season in October. Credit: Brandon Honig/USFWS Credit: Brandon Honig/USFWS
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An arctic fox blends into the snow. Credit: Keith Morehouse/USFWS
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Best in Snow: How Wildlife Weathers Winter

January 19, 2021

From frogs that freeze solid to meat-eating songbirds, nature has some fascinating winter survival tricks for enduring the cold weather.

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Winter Wildlife Sightings »»

An arctic fox blends into the snow. Credit: Keith Morehouse/USFWS
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An ornate box turtle. Credit: Grayson Smith/USFWS
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Service Awards $7.4 Million to Help Imperiled Species

January 13, 2021

Vulnerable wildlife across the nation will benefit from nearly $7.4 million in grants thanks to the Competitive State Wildlife Grant (C-SWG) Program. The program supports projects led by state and commonwealth fish and wildlife agencies protecting imperiled wildlife and their habitats. Supporting these projects can accelerate the recovery of endangered species and potentially prevent others from being listed under the Endangered Species Act. This year’s grantees will implement 17 conservation projects that span 28 states and four commonwealths.

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An ornate box turtle. Credit: Grayson Smith/USFWS
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An interior least tern incubating eggs. Credit: USFWS
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Trump Administration Celebrates Recovery of America’s Smallest Tern

January 12, 2021

After more than three decades of conservation partnerships inspired by the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is celebrating the delisting of the interior least tern due to recovery. Thanks to the diverse efforts of local, state and federal stakeholders across an 18-state range, the interior least tern’s populations are healthy, stable and increasing.

News Release »»

An interior least tern incubating eggs. Credit: USFWS
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Golden-cheeked warbler. Credit: Steve Maslowski/USFWS
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Service Finalizes Regulation Clarifying the Migratory Bird Treaty Act Implementation

January 5, 2021

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is publishing a final regulation that defines the scope of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA). Consistent with the text, purpose and history of the MBTA, the final regulation clarifies that conduct resulting in unintentional (incidental) injury or death of migratory birds is not prohibited under the MBTA. This rule provides regulatory certainty to the public, industries, states, tribes and other stakeholders about implementation of the MBTA and best practices for conservation.

News Release »»

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Golden-cheeked warbler. Credit: Steve Maslowski/USFWS
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America's Wild Read Credit: USFWS
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America’s Wild Read is Back!

January 5, 2021

The USFWS Conservation Library is relaunching America’s Wild Read, a virtual book club centered on inspiring readers to engage with conservation literature and nature writing. Read along with us, and look out for posts on the USFWS Conservation Library blog where we’ll weave together the perspectives of Fish and Wildlife Service thought leaders through their commentary and conversation. Join in on the discussion by posting your thoughts and responses. Our first selection is J. Drew Lanham’s The Home Place: Memoirs of a Colored Man’s Love Affair with Nature.

America's Wild Read »»

America's Wild Read Credit: USFWS
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Double-crested cormorant. Credit: USFWS
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Service Finalizes New Special Permit for Cormorant Management in Lower 48 States

December 22, 2020

Today, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced a final rule and final environmental impact statement to responsibly manage conflicts associated with double-crested cormorants in the United States. The final rule establishes a new special permit for state and federally recognized tribal wildlife agencies in the contiguous 48 United States to undertake additional cormorant control activities when permissible under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

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Double-crested cormorant. Credit: USFWS
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Watching Director Aurelia Skipwith sign the Memorandum of Understanding are from left: Kellis Moss, Ducks Unlimited; Kaitlyn Glover, Public Lands Council; Ethan Lane, National Cattlemen's Beef Association; and Chris Comer, Safari Club International. Credit: USFWS
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Trump Administration Finalizes Endangered Species Critical Habitat Designation Rule

December 18, 2020

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Aurelia Skipwith signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, Public Lands Council, Ducks Unlimited and Safari Club International. The agreement outlines a shared commitment to habitat conservation through sustainable multiple use. Working together, the partners will cultivate healthier ecosystems, wildlife populations, and local economies through hunting, fishing and livestock grazing.

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Watching Director Aurelia Skipwith sign the Memorandum of Understanding are from left: Kellis Moss, Ducks Unlimited; Kaitlyn Glover, Public Lands Council; Ethan Lane, National Cattlemen's Beef Association; and Chris Comer, Safari Club International. Credit: USFWS
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Monarch on New England Aster. Credit: Tom Koerner/USFWS
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Service Announces Listing Determination for the Monarch Butterfly

December 15, 2020

After a thorough assessment of the monarch butterfly’s status, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has found that adding the monarch butterfly to the list of threatened and endangered species is warranted but precluded by work on higher-priority listing actions. With this decision, the monarch becomes a candidate for listing under the Endangered Species Act, and its status will be reviewed each year until it is no longer a candidate. 

News Release »»

More Information »»

Monarch on New England Aster. Credit: Tom Koerner/USFWS
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The definition addresses a 2018 Supreme Court ruling in a case regarding dusky gopher frog critical habitat. Credit: John A. Tupy/Western Carolina University
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Service and NOAA Fisheries Finalize Regulatory Definition of Habitat

December 15, 2020

To improve implementation of the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA Fisheries have defined the term “habitat” under the act. Not previously defined by the act, the definition will help stimulate more effective conservation, and improve consistency and predictability around critical habitat designations.

News Release »»

The definition addresses a 2018 Supreme Court ruling in a case regarding dusky gopher frog critical habitat. Credit: John A. Tupy/Western Carolina University
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USFWS Director Aurelia Skipwith meets with Federal Wildlife Officers. Credit: USFWS
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More Than 13,600 Pounds of Illegal Narcotics Seized on National Wildlife Refuges in 2020

December 15, 2020

Today, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recognizes the public safety protection efforts of Federal Wildlife Officers who in 2020 successfully led the seizure of 13,615 pounds of illegal narcotics on national wildlife refuges. The 2020 street value of the seizures was $43 million -- 17 times more than in 2019, which was $2.5 million. The Trump Administration has made it a priority to end the drug overdose epidemic that kills approximately 70,000 Americans each year.  

News Release »»

USFWS Director Aurelia Skipwith meets with Federal Wildlife Officers. Credit: USFWS
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Wisdom incubates her newest egg. Credit: Jon Brack/Friends of Midway Atoll NWR
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As Usual, Wisdom the Albatross Returns to Midway Atoll

December 10, 2020

Wisdom, the world’s oldest known and banded wild bird, has returned to Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge and Battle of Midway National Memorial. At least 69 years old, Wisdom, a mōlī (Laysan albatross), was first seen at her nest this year at the end of last month. Biologists have confirmed that she has laid an egg.

A Reason for Hope »»

Wisdom incubates her newest egg. Credit: Jon Brack/Friends of Midway Atoll NWR
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Find a shooting range near you. Credit: USFWS
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Interactive Map for Shooting Sports Supports Safety, Conservation

December 5, 2020

Finding a place to shoot safely is now easier than ever thanks to a new interactive tool premiered today by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as part of its 83-year partnership with states, industry and individual firearms users who help pay for wildlife and natural resource conservation, hunter education and public shooting ranges through the Wildlife Restoration Program. The new map identifies a total of 623 ranges across the United States, including 183 archery ranges, 285 firearms ranges and 155 archery and firearms combined shooting ranges, highlighting opportunities and access from California to Massachusetts.

News Release »»

Learn More »»

Find a shooting range near you. Credit: USFWS
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Splash-backed poison frogs at the time of seizure. Credit: Alberto J. Gonzalez/USFWS
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Splash-backed Poison Frogs Fly Home to Brazil

December 4, 2020

In September, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wildlife inspectors carefully placed a container of 21 splash-backed poison frogs, including 19 of a rare blue-morph coloration, on a plane home to Brazil. The country doesn’t allow the frogs to be exported, but they are prized by collectors. U.S. wildlife inspectors seized the frogs as part of the fight against wildlife trafficking. In Brazil, the frogs will have a permanent home at the São Paulo Zoo, one of Brazil’s premier institutions.  

Frogs are Anything But ‘Blue’ »»

Splash-backed poison frogs at the time of seizure. Credit: Alberto J. Gonzalez/USFWS
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