Looking for Something in Particular?

Date to Start Search: (dd/mm/yyyy)

Date to End Search: (dd/mm/yyyy)

Stories from the Home Page

A male polar bear walks on pack ice near the open water. Credit: Eric Regehr / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Conservation of an Arctic Icon

January 13, 2017

The rapid loss of its sea-ice habitat is jeopardizing the future of the polar bear, and its fate will be determined by our willingness and ability to address climate change. While the international community grapples with that long-term challenge, the Conservation Management Plan for the polar bear, developed by U.S. government agencies, native communities, private organizations, scientists and subsistence hunters, outlines actions to improve the polar bear's immediate chances of surviving in the wild.

News Release »»

Conservation Management Plan »»

Questions and Answers »»

A male polar bear walks on pack ice near the open water. Credit: Eric Regehr / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

An almost otherworldly array of rainbow-colored fish, plants and corals inhabit reefs within Papah?naumoku?kea Marine National Monument in the Pacific Ocean. Credit: James Watt
Higher Quality Version of Image

'Hope Spots' in the Ocean

January 13, 2017

The ocean covers almost three-quarters of the Earth's surface and contains about 97 percent of the planet's water. We are just beginning to understand how the ocean's creatures are interconnected with one another and with us. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service cooperatively manages five marine national monuments that conserve ocean habitat, remote islands and atolls for the benefit of marine life – and people.

Photo Essay »»

An almost otherworldly array of rainbow-colored fish, plants and corals inhabit reefs within Papah?naumoku?kea Marine National Monument in the Pacific Ocean. Credit: James Watt
Higher Quality Version of Image

Students learn about native plant and animal food chains. Credit: Lisa Cox / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Immigrant Children Connect with Nature in Their New Home

January 13, 2017

With a Schoolyard Habitat in California, the Service and many volunteers and partners are helping children, mostly from war-torn countries such as Iraq and Syria, blossom into confident young girls and boys. 

Read More »»

Students learn about native plant and animal food chains. Credit: Lisa Cox / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Monarchs will benefit from habitat protection across the nation. Credit: Tom Koerner / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Federal Partnership Encourages Monarch Butterfly Conservation on Agricultural Lands

January 13, 2017

The monarch butterfly is a new national priority species of Working Lands for Wildlife, a partnership between the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The collaboration aims to help species recover by working with agricultural producers to make wildlife-friendly improvements on their farms, ranches and forests. Assistance is available to producers in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas and Wisconsin. 

News Release »»

Learn More »»

Monarchs will benefit from habitat protection across the nation. Credit: Tom Koerner / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Rusty patched bumble bee. Credit: Photo courtesy of Christy Stewart
Higher Quality Version of Image

Rusty Patched Bumble Bee Listed as Endangered

January 11, 2017

Just 20 years ago, the rusty patched bumble bee was a common sight across 28 states from Connecticut to South Dakota. But the species, now balancing precariously on the brink of extinction, has become the first bumble bee that the Fish and Wildlife Service has declared endangered. Like other bees, rusty patched bumble bees pollinate many plants, including economically important crops such as tomatoes, cranberries and peppers. Each year, insects, mostly bees, provide pollination services valued at an estimated $3 billion in the United States.

News Release »»

Rusty patched bumble bee. Credit: Photo courtesy of Christy Stewart
Higher Quality Version of Image

Snow geese at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge in California. Credit: Courtesy of Barbara Rich
Higher Quality Version of Image

Super Bird Fests at National Wildlife Refuges!

January 5, 2017

Looking for a special bird to add to your life list? Brand new to birding and just thrill to the sight of thousands of migrating birds? Bird festivals beckon you to national wildlife refuges throughout the year and from coast to coast. Many festivals coincide with spring or fall migration. Here are some great refuge bird festivals to catch in 2017. The National Wildlife Refuge System protects natural habitat for America's treasured wildlife species.

Bulletin »»

Find a Refuge »»

Snow geese at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge in California. Credit: Courtesy of Barbara Rich
Higher Quality Version of Image

he Lesser long-nosed bat is an important pollinator of cacti in the American Southwest. Credit: Courtesy of Bat Conservation International, Bruce D. Taubert.
Higher Quality Version of Image

Successful Recovery of Lesser Long-Nosed Bat Assisted by Citizen Science, Improved Research and Bat-friendly Tequila

January 5, 2017

Although many species of bat across the U.S. are not faring well, the lesser long-nosed bat is bucking that trend. Due to a host of traditional, and not so traditional, conservation efforts, the lesser long-nosed bat has rebounded from near extinction in the late 1980s to being the first bat species proposed for delisting under the Endangered Species Act. The success exemplifies the power, flexibility, and ingenuity that the act inspires. 

News Release »»

he Lesser long-nosed bat is an important pollinator of cacti in the American Southwest. Credit: Courtesy of Bat Conservation International, Bruce D. Taubert.
Higher Quality Version of Image

The Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation is awarded $1 million to protect 72.40 acres of coastal saltmarsh and adjacent uplands along the shoreline of the Allens Pond Estuary. Credit: Courtesy of Massachusetts DCR
Higher Quality Version of Image

Importance of Resilient Coastal Wetlands to Conservation, Recreation Economy, and Coastal Communities Recognized by $17 Million in Grants to States

January 5, 2017

Over $17 million will be awarded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to 20 projects in 10 coastal states to protect, restore or enhance more than 13,000 acres of coastal wetlands and adjacent upland habitats under the National Coastal Wetlands Conservation Grant Program. State and local governments, private landowners, conservation groups and other partners will contribute over $20 million in additional funds to these projects.

News Release »»

2017 Coastal Wetlands Grants Project List »»

Learn More »»

The Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation is awarded $1 million to protect 72.40 acres of coastal saltmarsh and adjacent uplands along the shoreline of the Allens Pond Estuary. Credit: Courtesy of Massachusetts DCR
Higher Quality Version of Image

Illegal ivory carvings that were seized by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Law Enforcement special agents and destroyed in 2013. Credit: Kate Miyamoto / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

China's Decision to Halt the Ivory Trade Is a Game-Changer

January 5, 2017

In a blog on the Huffington Post, Service Director Dan Ashe praises and thanks China for its "bold and consequential step" forward in pledging to end the commercial sale and processing of ivory and ivory products by the end of the year. While elephants remain in jeopardy, China's move will cut demand, which has been shown to be a major factor driving the illegal slaughter of elephants. The United States closed its ivory market last year. 

Read More »»

Related: U.S. and Sudan Talk Wildlife Trafficking »»

Video: U.S. ban: What can I do with my ivory? »»

Illegal ivory carvings that were seized by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Law Enforcement special agents and destroyed in 2013. Credit: Kate Miyamoto / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

"I am proud of our on-the-ground conservation actions for monarchs and other pollinators. It is catalyzing massive conservation effort across North America," says Service Director Dan Ashe. Credit: Eileen Hornbaker / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

330,000 Acres Restored or Enhanced for Monarchs; Number Blows Past Goal

January 4, 2017

The numbers are in for 2016, and they're impressive. The Fish and Wildlife Service worked to restore and enhance more than 330,000 acres in 2016 for monarchs and other pollinators. That exceeds the goal the Department of Interior set for us of restoring or enhancing 320,000 acres of habitat by end of fiscal year 2017.

Learn More »»

Save the Monarch Butterfly »»

"I am proud of our on-the-ground conservation actions for monarchs and other pollinators. It is catalyzing massive conservation effort across North America," says Service Director Dan Ashe. Credit: Eileen Hornbaker / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Hidden Lake bluecurls. Credit: Ayoola Folarin
Higher Quality Version of Image

Recovery of Tiny Mountain Plant Prompts Delisting Proposal

January 4, 2017

For nearly 20 years, Hidden Lake bluecurls, a tiny plant found only near a montane vernal pool in Riverside County, California, has been protected as “threatened” under the Endangered Species Act. Successful conservation efforts by the Service and partners have allowed its recovery, and today the Service proposed its removal from the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Plants. 

News Release »»

Hidden Lake bluecurls. Credit: Ayoola Folarin
Higher Quality Version of Image

Mountain yellow-legged frog. Credit: Rick Kuyper / USFWS Credit: Rick Kuyper / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Final Policy Provides Standards to Offset Impacts of Development on America’s Most At-Risk Species

December 23, 2016

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today finalized its Endangered Species Act (ESA) Compensatory Mitigation Policy (CMP). It is the first such policy issued by the Service. The policy that will effectively and sustainably offset the adverse impacts of development activities to the nation’s most at-risk species and their habitats. The policy follows a recent Presidential Memorandum directing the Department of the Interior to update its existing mitigation policy and craft a new policy that addresses mitigation of impacts on species that are listed, or may soon need to be listed under the ESA. The Service released a final revised Mitigation Policy in November 2016 and has now finalized the ESA CMP, which provides greater certainty and predictability to the regulated community while improving conservation outcomes for affected species.

News Release »»

FAQs »»

Learn More »»

Mountain yellow-legged frog. Credit: Rick Kuyper / USFWS Credit: Rick Kuyper / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Puerto Rico harlequin butterfly. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Federal Agencies Strengthen Opportunities for Public Engagement in Voluntary Conservation Efforts Under ESA

December 23, 2016

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA Fisheries have finalized revisions to the Candidate Conservation Agreements with Assurances (CCAAs) policy under the Endangered Species Act. The policy revisions do not change landowner requirements for participation in the program, but rather clarify and simplify the process of developing and approving CCAAs, which provide incentives for the public to implement specific conservation measures for declining species before they are listed under the ESA. The Service is also concurrently publishing changes to its CCAA regulations to make them consistent with these final changes to the policy.

News Release »»

Learn More »»

Puerto Rico harlequin butterfly. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

You might see curious river otters like these at Missouri’s Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge, about 90 miles north of Kansas City, and at many other refuges. Credit: Kenny Bahr
Higher Quality Version of Image

A Most Wonderful Time of the Year

December 21, 2016

“You can’t get too much winter in the winter,” American poet Robert Frost wrote. That’s not true for everybody, we know, but if you enjoy clean, crisp air and the great outdoors, winter is a special time of year at national wildlife refuges in northern latitudes.

Photo Essay »»

You might see curious river otters like these at Missouri’s Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge, about 90 miles north of Kansas City, and at many other refuges. Credit: Kenny Bahr
Higher Quality Version of Image

The black-capped vireo is America's smallest vireo species and breeds only in Oklahoma, Texas and northernmost Mexico. Credit: Gil Eckrich
Higher Quality Version of Image

American Songbird Sails to Recovery, Proposed for Delisting Under Endangered Species Act

December 15, 2016

Down to just 350 birds three decades ago, the black-capped vireo has made a remarkable recovery. Since being listed under the Endangered Species Act in 1987, Oklahoma and Texas, the U.S. Army, private landowners and conservation groups have all pitched in to restore and recover America's smallest vireo. As a result, this week the Service proposed delisting the black-capped vireo.

News Release »»

Learn More »»

The black-capped vireo is America's smallest vireo species and breeds only in Oklahoma, Texas and northernmost Mexico. Credit: Gil Eckrich
Higher Quality Version of Image