Looking for Something in Particular?

Date to Start Search: (dd/mm/yyyy)

Date to End Search: (dd/mm/yyyy)

Stories from the Home Page

Poacher's mounted bobcat and mountain lion (right). Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Wisconsin Poaching Scheme Exposed

April 2, 2019

Four longtime hound hunters who enjoyed decades of running their dogs after bear, mountain lion, bobcat and other wildlife are now branded as poachers and have lost their hunting privileges worldwide, some for up to four years. 

Judge: ‘They cut corners and cheated’ »»

Poacher's mounted bobcat and mountain lion (right). Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Screenshot image of the YouTube video, Poachers and Protectors: The Story of Scarlet Macaws in Honduras. Click to view video.  Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

New Film Showcases Effort to Combat Trafficking of Scarlet Macaws

April 1, 2019

In the dangerous Moskitia region of Honduras, poachers seek out the chicks and eggs of wild scarlet macaws. Their goal: sell them in the lucrative illegal pet trade. To counter the traffickers, brave community members, with the support of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, have united to patrol and protect the nests. Poachers and Protectors: The Story of Scarlet Macaws in Honduras puts a spotlight on the wildlife trafficking crisis in Latin America, and introduces us to some of the heroes who are willing to risk it all for these birds.

Watch the Film in Spanish »»

Audio Descriptions »»

How the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Helps Conserve Scarlet Macaws » »»

Screenshot image of the YouTube video, Poachers and Protectors: The Story of Scarlet Macaws in Honduras. Click to view video.  Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Anglers and boaters help improve fishing access through their contributions. Credit: RBFF Credit: RBFF
Higher Quality Version of Image

States Receive More Than $1 Billion for Recreation Access, Conservation

April 1, 2019

Outdoor recreationists who hunt, shoot, fish and boat are providing more than $1 billion this year to support increased outdoor access and wildlife habitat conservation across the United States.  The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is distributing the funds to all 50 states and U.S. territories today. The funds are generated through excise taxes on hunting, shooting and fishing equipment and boat fuel. 

News Release »»

Learn More »»

Anglers and boaters help improve fishing access through their contributions. Credit: RBFF Credit: RBFF
Higher Quality Version of Image

Navy veteran Chad Brown, right, founder of Soul River Inc. Runs Wild, pairs vets with inner-city youth on fishing trips to promote healing. Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge near Portland, Oregon, partners with Soul River. Credit: Courtesy of Chad Brown/Soul River Inc.
Higher Quality Version of Image

11 Ways Wildlife Refuges Make Life Better

March 21, 2019

Even if you’ve never set foot on one of the country’s 567 national wildlife refuges, you’ve probably benefited from its existence. 

We are Hard-wired to Crave Contact with Nature »»

Find a Refuge near You »»

Navy veteran Chad Brown, right, founder of Soul River Inc. Runs Wild, pairs vets with inner-city youth on fishing trips to promote healing. Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge near Portland, Oregon, partners with Soul River. Credit: Courtesy of Chad Brown/Soul River Inc.
Higher Quality Version of Image

Allowing adjacent landowners to use district lands is a way we could help our neighbors and protect the cattle they depend on,” says Brad Krohn, project leader for the Rainwater Basin Waterfowl Management District. Credit: Brad Krohn/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

After Flooding, Service Staff Make Room for Neighbors’ Cattle

March 21, 2019

Recent flooding in Nebraska left fields used for winter pasture full of mud too deep for cattle to walk through. Staff at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District have been helping two neighboring ranchers with emergency grazing, welcoming more than 400 animals onto waterfowl production areas on higher ground.

'This is our Community' »»

Allowing adjacent landowners to use district lands is a way we could help our neighbors and protect the cattle they depend on,” says Brad Krohn, project leader for the Rainwater Basin Waterfowl Management District. Credit: Brad Krohn/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Turtles were smuggled using a variety of methods. Here they are concealed inside athletic socks and surrounded by food packages. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Turtle Smuggler Gets Stiff Sentence

March 20, 2019

Four South Carolina men were sentenced for smuggling endangered or protected turtles to and from the United States. One defendant was sentenced to 27 months in federal prison and ordered to forfeit more than $263,000 from illicit proceeds.

News Release (DOJ) »»

Turtles were smuggled using a variety of methods. Here they are concealed inside athletic socks and surrounded by food packages. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

The White House. Credit: The White House
Higher Quality Version of Image

President Requests $1.3B for Service in FY 2020

March 18, 2019

President Donald Trump has proposed a budget of $1.3 billion in Fiscal Year 2020 to fund the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s principal resource management and conservation programs. An additional $1.5 billion in permanent funding is administered to states through grants that support state wildlife and sport fish conservation, recreational boating and related programs. The President’s Budget invests in outdoor recreational opportunities, improvements to the permitting processes and infrastructure, and work to recover species listed under the Endangered Species Act.

Service's Budget Justification »»

News Release »»

Budget Brief (DOI) »»

The White House. Credit: The White House
Higher Quality Version of Image

The gray wolf. Credit: Gary Kramer/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Department of the Interior Celebrates Recovery of the Gray Wolf with Proposal to Return Management to States, Tribes

March 14, 2019

The gray wolf, an iconic species of the American West, had all but disappeared from the landscape in the lower 48 states by the early 20th century. Now it roams free in nine states and is stable and healthy throughout its current range. This constitutes one of the greatest comebacks for an animal in U.S. conservation history. The Service is re-affirming the success of this recovery with a proposal to remove all gray wolves from protection under Endangered Species Act.

News Release »»

Learn more about wolf recovery »»

The gray wolf. Credit: Gary Kramer/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

P is for this pinniped – in this case, a seal at Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Ian Shive/Tandem
Higher Quality Version of Image

Refuge Animals From A to Z

March 6, 2019

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conserves land and water on national wildlife refuges for more than 700 species of birds, 220 species of mammals, 250 reptile and amphibian species, and more than 1,000 species of fish.

The Refuge Animal Alphabet »»

P is for this pinniped – in this case, a seal at Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Ian Shive/Tandem
Higher Quality Version of Image

Jackie Ferrier, 2019 Refuge Manager of the Year and project leader of Willapa National Wildlife Refuge Complex. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Herstory: First Woman Named Refuge Manager of the Year

March 4, 2019

History is not just about the past. It is about real people making real achievements every day. Jackie Ferrier, project leader of the Willapa National Wildlife Refuge Complex in Washington state, is one of those people. During Women’s History Month, we want to acknowledge Ferrier, who last month was named 2019 Refuge Manager of the Year by the National Wildlife Refuge Association. This marks the first time in the award’s 25-year history that a woman has received the honor.

‘Refuge Manager's Dream Come True’ »»

Women’s History Month »»

Jackie Ferrier, 2019 Refuge Manager of the Year and project leader of Willapa National Wildlife Refuge Complex. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Fostering institutions care for young northern red-bellied cooters until they are larger than the palm of a hand. Credit: Bridget Macdonald/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

In Massachusetts, Turtles Get a Head Start in School

March 1, 2019

In the 1980s, scientists were concerned about the decline of northern red-bellied cooters in Massachusetts. They had estimated there were only 200 of the turtles left in the state, all in 12 ponds in Plymouth County. So they sent them to school. Since the initiation of the student-led program to raise turtles, 4,334 head-started cooters have been released into 33 sites in eastern Massachusetts. 

Restoring a Species »»

Fostering institutions care for young northern red-bellied cooters until they are larger than the palm of a hand. Credit: Bridget Macdonald/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Snow angel, Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge, Minnesota. Why did a large-winged bird leave such a deep impression in the snow at Tamarac Refuge? Credit: Lee Kensinger/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Snow Tracks

February 27, 2019

Winter is a great time to find signs of wildlife on national wildlife refuges. Snow prints may reveal clues to an animal’s size, diet, gait and habits. Some tracks and prints tell stories of struggle and survival.

Reading the Marks »»

Find a Refuge Near Your »»

Snow angel, Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge, Minnesota. Why did a large-winged bird leave such a deep impression in the snow at Tamarac Refuge? Credit: Lee Kensinger/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

The Borax Lake chub can withstand the harsh conditions of remnant desert waters of the Great Basin, where surface water temperatures reach up to 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Credit: The Nature Conservancy
Higher Quality Version of Image

Little Fish Makes Big Recovery

February 26, 2019

The tiny Borax Lake chub exists only in Borax Lake, a unique spring-fed lake in the Alvord Basin of southeast Oregon.  The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to delist this endangered fish because threats to its survival have been reduced thanks to our partners at The Nature Conservancy, Bureau of Land Management and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. 

Protecting the Chub Protects a Biodiverse Desert Ecosystem »»

FAQs »»

Storymap »»

The Borax Lake chub can withstand the harsh conditions of remnant desert waters of the Great Basin, where surface water temperatures reach up to 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Credit: The Nature Conservancy
Higher Quality Version of Image

A pair of scarlet of Macaws in Costa Rica. Credit: Tom Murray/Creative Commons
Higher Quality Version of Image

Scarlet Macaw Receives Endangered Species Act Protections

February 25, 2019

The scarlet macaw’s range in Mesoamerica (Mexico and Central America) has been reduced over the past several decades, so the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has taken the bird under its wing. Now, one subspecies is protected as endangered, others as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. In addition, a rule allows for interstate commerce and the import and export of certain captive-bred birds while ensuring needed protections.

Northern Subspecies Listed as Endangered »»

A pair of scarlet of Macaws in Costa Rica. Credit: Tom Murray/Creative Commons
Higher Quality Version of Image

A Blanding’s turtle crosses the road. Credit: Courtney Celley/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Speaking Up for Wildlife: How to Report Wildlife Crime

February 25, 2019

People just like you help us protect everything from native turtles to pallid sturgeon and bald eagles. Learn what to do if you believe you have information related to a wildlife crime. Help us close the next case, and you may be eligible for a monetary reward.

Trust Your Gut » »»

A Blanding’s turtle crosses the road. Credit: Courtney Celley/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image