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Elizabeth Ann, the first cloned black-footed ferret and first-ever cloned U.S. endangered species, at 68-days old. Credit: USFWS National Black-footed Ferret Conservation Center
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Innovative Genetic Research Boosts Black-footed Ferret Conservation Efforts

February 18, 2021

Black-footed ferret recovery efforts aimed at increased genetic diversity and disease resistance took a bold step Dec. 10, 2020, with the birth of Elizabeth Ann, created from the frozen cells of Willa, a black-footed ferret that lived more than 30 years ago. The work results from a partnership among the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and species recovery partners and scientists. Until Elizabeth Ann, all black-footed ferrets were descended from seven individuals, which can create recovery challenges.

News Release »»

Elizabeth Ann, the first cloned black-footed ferret and first-ever cloned U.S. endangered species, at 68-days old. Credit: USFWS National Black-footed Ferret Conservation Center
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Civilian Conservation Corps members build a bridge at Dale Bumpers White River National Wildlife Refuge in Arkansas. Credit: Civilian Conservation Corps
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Unsung Heroes of American Conservation

February 10, 2021

Richard Kanaski, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service archaeologist, is compiling information about African-American Civilian Conservation Corps enrollees throughout the South. His ultimate goal: Shine a spotlight on the major role played by African Americans in the creation of wildlife refuges, and in the rebuilding this country from the depths of the Great Depression. 

Story »»

Civilian Conservation Corps members build a bridge at Dale Bumpers White River National Wildlife Refuge in Arkansas. Credit: Civilian Conservation Corps
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Pelican Island is the first national wildlife refuge, protected in 1903. Credit: George Nelson
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Service Celebrates 150 Years of Conservation

February 9, 2021

The origins of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service began 1871 with the creation of the U.S. Commission of Fish and Fisheries. Since then, the name of our agency has changed multiple times, yet what endures is our dedication to conserve the nature of America.

10 Surprising Facts About the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service » Timeline of Our History »»

Pelican Island is the first national wildlife refuge, protected in 1903. Credit: George Nelson
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A juvenile male rufous hummingbird sipping nectar. Credit: Tom Koerner/USFWS
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Migratory Bird Treaty Act Rule Effective Date Extended, Service Seeks Public Input

February 9, 2021

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is extending the effective date and seeking public comment related to a Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) rule that was finalized on January 7, 2021. The Service requests information on issues of fact, law and policy raised by the rule and whether that rule should be amended, rescinded, delayed pending further review by the agency, or allowed to go into effect. Public comments must be received or postmarked on or before March 1, 2021. 

Learn More »»

A juvenile male rufous hummingbird sipping nectar. Credit: Tom Koerner/USFWS
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Wisdom‘s newest chick shortly after hatching, with its Dad, Akeakamai. Credit: Jon Brack/Friends of Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge
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Albatross Wisdom Becomes a Mom Again

February 5, 2021

Wisdom, a mōlī (Laysan albatross) and world’s oldest known, banded wild bird, hatched a new chick this week at Midway Atoll. Biologists first observed the egg pipping on January 29. Pipping is when a young bird begins to crack the shell of the egg when hatching. After several days, the chick hatched on February 1.

Wisdom's Blog »»

Life Among the Albatross »»

Wisdom‘s newest chick shortly after hatching, with its Dad, Akeakamai. Credit: Jon Brack/Friends of Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge
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All the construction work on the project was handled by the Service’s heavy equipment professionals, saving taxpayers close to $200,000 for the project. Credit: USFWS
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Racing the Tide

January 26, 2021

A project on the Oregon Coast that aimed to reduce flooding and improve habitat for fish and wildlife included challenging nighttime work that had to be done at the lowest tides. Tackling this job were heavy equipment operators of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, or as they are known throughout the agency, the backbone of the Service. They turn habitat conservation dreams into reality.

Story Map »»

All the construction work on the project was handled by the Service’s heavy equipment professionals, saving taxpayers close to $200,000 for the project. Credit: USFWS
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Alewife is one species of river herring that spawned in the Presumpscot River historically. Credit: Will Parson/Chesapeake Bay Program
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Rallying ‘Round the Presumpscot

January 26, 2021

Restoring fish passage is nothing out of the ordinary for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Since 2009, we’ve removed more than 750 stream barriers throughout the Northeast alone, opening 7,350 river miles and 44,500 acres of wetland habitat. Thanks to a recent project in Maine, nearly complete, migratory fish have access to five more miles of the Presumpscot River…and the community benefits as well.

A Decades-long Endeavor »»

Alewife is one species of river herring that spawned in the Presumpscot River historically. Credit: Will Parson/Chesapeake Bay Program
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A male Chinook salmon, with red coloration, strikes another male Chinook on Clear Creek in Redding, California, during spawning season in October. Credit: Brandon Honig/USFWS Credit: Brandon Honig/USFWS
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Restoration Brings Salmon, People Back to Clear Creek

January 19, 2021

Along with partners, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been working at California’s Clear Creek for decades. The project has paid off, and the area now attracts “families utilizing the area, swimming with kids, fishing, mountain biking, hiking with dogs.”

Read the full story »»

A male Chinook salmon, with red coloration, strikes another male Chinook on Clear Creek in Redding, California, during spawning season in October. Credit: Brandon Honig/USFWS Credit: Brandon Honig/USFWS
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An arctic fox blends into the snow. Credit: Keith Morehouse/USFWS
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Best in Snow: How Wildlife Weathers Winter

January 19, 2021

From frogs that freeze solid to meat-eating songbirds, nature has some fascinating winter survival tricks for enduring the cold weather.

Blog »»

Winter Wildlife Sightings »»

An arctic fox blends into the snow. Credit: Keith Morehouse/USFWS
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An ornate box turtle. Credit: Grayson Smith/USFWS
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Service Awards $7.4 Million to Help Imperiled Species

January 13, 2021

Vulnerable wildlife across the nation will benefit from nearly $7.4 million in grants thanks to the Competitive State Wildlife Grant (C-SWG) Program. The program supports projects led by state and commonwealth fish and wildlife agencies protecting imperiled wildlife and their habitats. Supporting these projects can accelerate the recovery of endangered species and potentially prevent others from being listed under the Endangered Species Act. This year’s grantees will implement 17 conservation projects that span 28 states and four commonwealths.

News Release »»

Learn More »»

An ornate box turtle. Credit: Grayson Smith/USFWS
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An interior least tern incubating eggs. Credit: USFWS
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Trump Administration Celebrates Recovery of America’s Smallest Tern

January 12, 2021

After more than three decades of conservation partnerships inspired by the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is celebrating the delisting of the interior least tern due to recovery. Thanks to the diverse efforts of local, state and federal stakeholders across an 18-state range, the interior least tern’s populations are healthy, stable and increasing.

News Release »»

An interior least tern incubating eggs. Credit: USFWS
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Golden-cheeked warbler. Credit: Steve Maslowski/USFWS
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Service Finalizes Regulation Clarifying the Migratory Bird Treaty Act Implementation

January 5, 2021

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is publishing a final regulation that defines the scope of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA). Consistent with the text, purpose and history of the MBTA, the final regulation clarifies that conduct resulting in unintentional (incidental) injury or death of migratory birds is not prohibited under the MBTA. This rule provides regulatory certainty to the public, industries, states, tribes and other stakeholders about implementation of the MBTA and best practices for conservation.

News Release »»

Learn More »»

Golden-cheeked warbler. Credit: Steve Maslowski/USFWS
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America's Wild Read Credit: USFWS
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America’s Wild Read is Back!

January 5, 2021

The USFWS Conservation Library is relaunching America’s Wild Read, a virtual book club centered on inspiring readers to engage with conservation literature and nature writing. Read along with us, and look out for posts on the USFWS Conservation Library blog where we’ll weave together the perspectives of Fish and Wildlife Service thought leaders through their commentary and conversation. Join in on the discussion by posting your thoughts and responses. Our first selection is J. Drew Lanham’s The Home Place: Memoirs of a Colored Man’s Love Affair with Nature.

America's Wild Read »»

America's Wild Read Credit: USFWS
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Double-crested cormorant. Credit: USFWS
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Service Finalizes New Special Permit for Cormorant Management in Lower 48 States

December 22, 2020

Today, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced a final rule and final environmental impact statement to responsibly manage conflicts associated with double-crested cormorants in the United States. The final rule establishes a new special permit for state and federally recognized tribal wildlife agencies in the contiguous 48 United States to undertake additional cormorant control activities when permissible under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

News Release »»

More Information »»

Double-crested cormorant. Credit: USFWS
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Watching Director Aurelia Skipwith sign the Memorandum of Understanding are from left: Kellis Moss, Ducks Unlimited; Kaitlyn Glover, Public Lands Council; Ethan Lane, National Cattlemen's Beef Association; and Chris Comer, Safari Club International. Credit: USFWS
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Trump Administration Finalizes Endangered Species Critical Habitat Designation Rule

December 18, 2020

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Aurelia Skipwith signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, Public Lands Council, Ducks Unlimited and Safari Club International. The agreement outlines a shared commitment to habitat conservation through sustainable multiple use. Working together, the partners will cultivate healthier ecosystems, wildlife populations, and local economies through hunting, fishing and livestock grazing.

Blog »»

Watching Director Aurelia Skipwith sign the Memorandum of Understanding are from left: Kellis Moss, Ducks Unlimited; Kaitlyn Glover, Public Lands Council; Ethan Lane, National Cattlemen's Beef Association; and Chris Comer, Safari Club International. Credit: USFWS
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