Looking for Something in Particular?

Date to Start Search: (dd/mm/yyyy)

Date to End Search: (dd/mm/yyyy)

Stories from the Home Page

Federal Wildlife Officers Shane Kempf (far right) and Greg Burgess (center), from Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex in California, shopped with two brothers from schools in Yuba City. Each student received a $100 gift card to shop. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Refuge Wildlife Officers Help Make Holidays Merrier for Youth

December 22, 2018

The “Shop With a Cop” program has grown across the nation as a way of improving relations between police officers and young people. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Federal Wildlife Officers in several regions grabbed the chance to help brighten the holiday season for families.

Story »»

Federal Wildlife Officers Shane Kempf (far right) and Greg Burgess (center), from Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex in California, shopped with two brothers from schools in Yuba City. Each student received a $100 gift card to shop. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Three generations of Bowies: Lane (from left), Mark and John. Credit: Phil Kloer/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Making Memories in a Duck Blind

February 14, 2018

For a 12-year-old hunter in Alabama, connecting with family and the outdoors trumps video games, even in the cold, even if he harvests nothing. “It’s fun to be outdoors and take a break from school,” Lane Bowie says, “and I like being with my dad and grandpa.”

Story »»

Learn More about Hunting »»

Three generations of Bowies: Lane (from left), Mark and John. Credit: Phil Kloer/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

The White House. Credit: The White House
Higher Quality Version of Image

President Requests $1.2 Billion Budget for Service in FY19, Proposes Fund to Improve Refuge Infrastructure

February 12, 2018

President Donald Trump has proposed a $1.2 billion Fiscal Year 2019 budget for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that includes proposed legislation to establish a Public Lands Infrastructure Fund. The fund would take revenue from federal energy leasing and development and provide up to $18 billion for repairs and improvements in national wildlife refuges, national parks and Bureau of Indian Education funded schools. The Service's budget also includes $1.6 billion in permanent funding, which is administered to states through grants that support state wildlife and sport fish conservation, recreational boating and other related programs.

News Release »»

Department of the Interior News Release »»

FY 2019 Budget Justification »»

The White House. Credit: The White House
Higher Quality Version of Image

A child inspects a dragonfly he caught before sketching it in a nature notebook at Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in Wisconsin. The outdoor nature study championed by Anna Comstock continues today on refuges. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Anna Comstock: A Force of Nature

February 7, 2018

American conservationist and nature study artist Anna Comstock cultivated children’s love of the outdoors to awaken in them a passion for science and nature. Today, national wildlife refuges keep alive the learning tradition she started.

Photo Essay »»

A child inspects a dragonfly he caught before sketching it in a nature notebook at Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in Wisconsin. The outdoor nature study championed by Anna Comstock continues today on refuges. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Bull elk at Wichita Mountains Refuge. Credit: W. Munsterman
Higher Quality Version of Image

Science Enables Elk Hunting at Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge

February 7, 2018

By 1875, elk disappeared from what would become Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma, the victims of overhunting. In 1908, a single bull elk from an area zoo began the reintroduction effort. The herd thrived. Careful scientific management of elk to ensure a healthy herd continues. One of the tools used is hunting.

Story »»

Learn More About Hunting »»

Bull elk at Wichita Mountains Refuge. Credit: W. Munsterman
Higher Quality Version of Image

Serenity Coleman planting milkweed for monarch butterflies. Credit: Patrick D. Martin/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

African American History Month: Sorority Embraces Environmental Stewardship

February 7, 2018

Each spring, national wildlife refuges across the country welcome leading African American sorority Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., a national partner of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and friends for Zeta Days at the Refuge. This joint initiative promotes outdoor recreation and environmental education among Zeta members, including those not familiar with all nature and public lands have to offer. During African American History Month, we revisit last year’s Zeta Days event at Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge in Kansas.

Story »»

Serenity Coleman planting milkweed for monarch butterflies. Credit: Patrick D. Martin/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

A monarch near Death Valley, California. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Western Monarchs Need Our Help

February 5, 2018

February 5 is Western Monarch Day, a day to celebrate the lesser-known branch of the famed butterfly family. Western monarchs migrate, just not in the droves their eastern cousins do. Some overwinter on the Pacific Coast, and during the spring and summer the butterflies can be found throughout California and in the Pacific Northwest. Unfortunately, the western monarch does share something in common with its eastern counterpart: declining population numbers. A new study tallied fewer than 200,000 monarchs, the lowest number since 2012.

News Release »»

Blog »»

Learn More about Monarchs »»

A monarch near Death Valley, California. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Left to right, Barbara “Barb” Langley, Heather Williams, Joy Robinson and Crystal Williams work on a basket made from longleaf pine needles. Credit: Coushatta Tribe
Higher Quality Version of Image

Woven from the Land

February 1, 2018

The Service works with countless partners to restore longleaf pine forests in the Southeast. The motivation for many of these conservationists is to help the many at-risk wildlife that thrive in these forests from the red-cockaded woodpecker to the gopher tortoise. The Sovereign Nation of the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana has an additional motive: Elders weave beautiful, intricate baskets from longleaf pine needles.

Story »»

Left to right, Barbara “Barb” Langley, Heather Williams, Joy Robinson and Crystal Williams work on a basket made from longleaf pine needles. Credit: Coushatta Tribe
Higher Quality Version of Image

Colorful monarch butterfly bicycles and pollinator helmets were used for photos and rides on the lake. Credit: Melissa A. Clark / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

As Big Game Comes to Minnesota, Go Monarchs!

January 28, 2018

Through February 11 (taking place during Super Bowl 52 in Minneapolis), the Service's Urban Wildlife Conservation Program is teaming with local artists and the Minneapolis Public Schools to present the Monarch Butterfly Migration Shanty and Art Shanty Village, an interactive art exhibit on the frozen Lake Harriet with more than 20 structures and interactive exhibits representing more than 100 artists. The goal is to raise awareness of monarch butterflies and other pollinators.

Story »»

Colorful monarch butterfly bicycles and pollinator helmets were used for photos and rides on the lake. Credit: Melissa A. Clark / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Danielle Tentschert, of Ocean Connectors, speaks to a group of students from National City, California. Credit: Anna Mar/Ocean Connectors
Higher Quality Version of Image

Inspired to Change the World

January 24, 2018

A partnership in Southern California focuses on case studies of well-known marine species to educate, inspire and connect youth in Pacific coastal communities of the U.S. and Mexico.

Story »»

Danielle Tentschert, of Ocean Connectors, speaks to a group of students from National City, California. Credit: Anna Mar/Ocean Connectors
Higher Quality Version of Image

Wilderness Fellow Alicia Thomas installs a swim-in trap to capture ducks for banding at Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge in Nevada. Credit: Traver Detras
Higher Quality Version of Image

‘I want to do this forever’

January 24, 2018

Student internships and volunteer stints for young people on national wildlife refuges can change lives. Check out some of the many opportunities available.

Photo Essay »»

Wilderness Fellow Alicia Thomas installs a swim-in trap to capture ducks for banding at Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge in Nevada. Credit: Traver Detras
Higher Quality Version of Image

Nicole Strawderman watches the Eagle Creek Fire. Credit: Jared Strawderman
Higher Quality Version of Image

Expecting First Child, Refuge Caretakers Face Raging Wildfire

January 17, 2018

Nine months pregnant, Nicole Strawderman watched from her home as the Eagle Creek Fire in Columbia Gorge engulfed tree after tree, acre after acre. Nicole and husband Jared, volunteer caretakers and full-time residents of Pierce National Wildlife Refuge in Washington, tracked the blaze anxiously in early September as it burned across the Columbia River. High winds were fueling the blaze and sending red-hot embers floating through the sky.

Story »»

Nicole Strawderman watches the Eagle Creek Fire. Credit: Jared Strawderman
Higher Quality Version of Image

Maine has the lower 48's largest lynx population. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

The Comeback Cat

January 16, 2018

Thanks, in big part to private landowners, the population of Canada lynx in Maine has soared. Research shows that the species is well on its way to becoming America’s latest conservation success, with the Service reaching a scientific conclusion last week that lynx in the lower 48 are adequately protected and may no longer meet the federal “threatened” status.

Story »»

Learn More »»

Maine has the lower 48's largest lynx population. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

A bull moose crosses a side channel of the Green River at Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge in Wyoming. Credit: Tom Koerner/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Here’s Why All Rivers Matter

January 10, 2018

Rivers sustain us in vital ways – worth noting on the 50th anniversary of the Wild and Scenic Rivers System, which protects more than 12,000 miles of our nation’s rivers. Some of these rivers are on national wildlife refuges. Take a look at why rivers — all rivers — matter.

Photo Essay »»

A bull moose crosses a side channel of the Green River at Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge in Wyoming. Credit: Tom Koerner/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

The annual Christmas tree drop at Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge in New Orleans. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Recycling Christmas Trees for Wildlife

January 3, 2018

Are you taking down the tree you carefully decorated for the holidays? Don't just trash them! With a little care, these trees can often benefit your local wildlife, the soil in your yard or even nearby restoration projects.

Story »»

The annual Christmas tree drop at Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge in New Orleans. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image