Looking for Something in Particular?

Date to Start Search: (dd/mm/yyyy)

Date to End Search: (dd/mm/yyyy)

Stories from the Home Page

Golden-cheeked warbler. Credit: Steve Maslowski / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Solicits Public Input on Proposed Rule and Environmental Impact Statement for Migratory Bird Treaty Act

January 30, 2020

The Service is proposing a rule that defines the scope of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act to provide regulatory certainty to the public, industries, states, tribes and other stakeholders. In addition, the Service has determined that a combined Environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act is the most efficient and comprehensive approach for considering the impacts of this action on the environment. Both will be available for public comment for 45 days beginning February 3, 2020.

News Release »»

Proposed Rule »»

Notice of Intent »»

Learn More »»

Golden-cheeked warbler. Credit: Steve Maslowski / USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Agents excavated five tiger carcasses that were illegally taken by the defendant. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

'Joe Exotic' Sentenced to 22 Years for Murder-For-Hire, Wildlife Violations

January 27, 2020

U.S. Attorney Timothy J. Downing credited "countless hours of detailed investigative work by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service" and FBI for a strong sentence last week against the man known as "Joe Exotic." He was sentenced to 22 years in prison after a federal jury convicted him of two counts of murder-for-hire, eight counts of violating the Lacey Act for falsifying wildlife records and nine counts of violating the Endangered Species Act.

News Release »»

Agents excavated five tiger carcasses that were illegally taken by the defendant. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Employees Work with Partners to Combat Fire at the San Diego National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Blaine Inglis/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Employees Fight Wildfires at Home and Abroad

January 24, 2020

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service fire management professionals work tirelessly to rapidly extinguish wildfires throughout the National Wildlife Refuge System. In 2019, Service staff committed over 155,000 hours to wildland fire response and all-hazard risk management, treating 183,000 acres for hazardous fuels reduction through prescribed fire and mechanical treatments. The Service also continues to support ongoing efforts to combat the catastrophic wildfires in Australia. Since December, seven Service firefighters have deployed along with more than 140 from other Department of the Interior bureaus and the U.S. Forest Service.

News Release »»

Service Employees Work with Partners to Combat Fire at the San Diego National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Blaine Inglis/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Invasive Chinese Mitten Crabs. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Wildlife Inspectors Crack Down on the Illegal Mitten Crab Trade

January 24, 2020

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wildlife inspectors have prevented the illegal and potentially harmful import of approximately 15,000 live Chinese mitten crabs as part of a law enforcement operation codenamed Hidden Mitten. Chinese mitten crabs are one of North America's most invasive species and pose a serious threat to humans and the environment. Recent studies estimate that the economic cost of combating invasive species in the United States is approximately $120 billion per year.

News Release »»

Invasive Chinese Mitten Crabs. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

This 2019-20 Duck Stamp featuring a wood duck and decoy illustrates one type of hunting-related element that artists may incorporate into future stamp designs. Credit: © USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Proposes Changes to the Duck Stamp to Celebrate the Conservation Achievements of Waterfowl Hunters

January 23, 2020

Over the past century, waterfowl hunters have helped create and conserve millions of acres of wetland habitat that not only provide places for a wide diversity of wildlife to thrive, but also help in flood control and water purification efforts, and create significant economic stimulus for rural communities. The Service today proposed to celebrate these hunters' remarkable achievements and our unique American hunting heritage with a permanent change to the Federal Migratory Bird Conservation Stamp, commonly known as the Duck Stamp.

News Release »»

Learn more about the Duck Stamp »»

Draft Proposed Rule »»

This 2019-20 Duck Stamp featuring a wood duck and decoy illustrates one type of hunting-related element that artists may incorporate into future stamp designs. Credit: © USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Double-crested cormorant. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Solicits Public Input on Cormorant Management

January 21, 2020

As part of ongoing efforts to address conflicts between double-crested cormorants and wild and stocked fisheries, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing an advance notice of proposed rulemaking and soliciting public input on future management options.

 

News Release »»

More Information »»

Double-crested cormorant. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

By the mid-twentieth century, fewer than 30 nene remained in the wild on a small area on the island of Hawaii; 13 birds survived in captivity. Today there are more than 2,800 individual birds. Credit: Brenda Zaun/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Hawaii's State Bird is On the Road to Recovery

January 16, 2020

After 60 years of effective collaborative conservation efforts among federal, state and local partners the Hawaiian goose, or nene, is one step closer to recovery. An intensive captive-breeding program, rigorous habitat restoration and active management strategies have led to the nene's return from the brink of extinction. As a result, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has finalized a decision to downlist the nene from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act.

News Release »»

By the mid-twentieth century, fewer than 30 nene remained in the wild on a small area on the island of Hawaii; 13 birds survived in captivity. Today there are more than 2,800 individual birds. Credit: Brenda Zaun/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

A black-capped chickadee perches on a branch. Credit: David Ellis/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Where are the Winter Birds?

January 16, 2020

Have you noticed that the number of birds visiting your yard each winter seems to fluctuate year to year? Some years it may seem that you have an abundance of birds, making it difficult to keep feeders stocked, while other years seem much more manageable. What you might be experiencing is called an irruption – a sharp, irregular movement of birds to an area where they aren’t normally found. While this may seem unusual, it’s more common than you might think.

A Wide Variety of Birds Can Have Irruptions »»

A black-capped chickadee perches on a branch. Credit: David Ellis/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Wetlands Credit: Kayt Johnson/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Increases Transparency on Refuge Wetland Easements

January 3, 2020

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service issued new internal guidance to provide better government services and alleviate conflict with landowners stemming from easement deeds that pre-date 1976. Easement deeds that pre-date 1976 did not contain maps or sufficiently detailed descriptions to ensure accurate demarcation of wetland easement boundaries. The Service is modernizing the way it demarcates wetland easements to clear up this confusion.

News Release »»

Wetlands Credit: Kayt Johnson/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Members of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., commemorate a visit to Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge in Connecticut. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Try Nature. It’s Good for You.

January 2, 2020

Getting outdoors in nature — on national wildlife refuges, for example — can improve your peace of mind and physical well-being. Many refuges are working with their communities to strengthen that health-and-nature connection.

Learn More »»

Members of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., commemorate a visit to Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge in Connecticut. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Wetland area at Green River National Wildlife Refuge in Kentucky. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Unveils New National Wildlife Refuge in Kentucky

December 22, 2019

Today, U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt, along with U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Service Principal Deputy Director Margaret Everson, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources and other officials, announced the establishment of the Green River National Wildlife Refuge near the confluence of the Ohio and Green rivers in Henderson, Kentucky. This is the 568th refuge in the National Wildlife Refuge System.

News Release »»

Wetland area at Green River National Wildlife Refuge in Kentucky. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Aurelia Skipwith visits Necedah National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Senate Confirms Aurelia Skipwith as Director of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

December 12, 2019

Today, the U.S. Senate voted to confirm Aurelia Skipwith as Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Skipwith has served as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks at the Department of the Interior since April 19, 2017. "I am truly honored to serve the American people under the leadership of President Trump and Secretary Bernhardt," says Service Director Skipwith.

News Release »»

Aurelia Skipwith visits Necedah National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

The veteran's hunt is just one example of the work by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to promote outdoor opportunities of all types, including hunting, fishing and recreational opportunities on public lands. Credit: Brent Lawrence/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Veterans Discover Tranquility in Nature

December 10, 2019

"Being injured, I didn't know how I was going to go about living my life besides raising my kids and being at home. Being introduced to the outdoor sports is incredible. ... Being outdoors, I believe, is the best therapy you can get," says U.S. Army veteran Sal Trujillo. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and partners from the Washington Waterfowl Association's Lower Columbia Chapter and The Fallen Outdoors introduced 20 new and notice veterans to waterfowl hunting at the Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge Veterans Hunt.

Storymap »»

The veteran's hunt is just one example of the work by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to promote outdoor opportunities of all types, including hunting, fishing and recreational opportunities on public lands. Credit: Brent Lawrence/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Two toms vie for hens' attention at Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge in Illinois. Credit: Jim Osborn
Higher Quality Version of Image

Wild Facts About Wild Turkeys

November 26, 2019

Amuse your guests this Thanksgiving with these offbeat wild turkey facts. 

Fact #1: Turkeys Do More Than Gobble »»

Two toms vie for hens' attention at Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge in Illinois. Credit: Jim Osborn
Higher Quality Version of Image

Northern pintails in flight Credit: J. Kelly/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image

Service Improves Permit Application System

November 25, 2019

In an effort to simplify, expedite and improve the permit application process, the public can now apply, and pay for, certain U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service permits online. Prior to developing an electronic permitting system, applicants had to apply for permits through mail with paper checks. The new system will allow users to apply, and pay for, certain international affairs and migratory birds permits through a user-friendly database and pay.gov, a secure electronic payment system. 

News Release »»

Northern pintails in flight Credit: J. Kelly/USFWS
Higher Quality Version of Image