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Stories from the Home Page

Margaret Everson, Principal Deputy Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (right) meets with the Minister of Environment for Angola to discuss combating wildlife crime. Credit: USFWS
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U.S. Leadership Supports Conservation Gains for Wildlife and Plant Species at International Convention

August 28, 2019

At the 18th meeting of the Conference of the Parties (CoP) of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), U.S. government leaders recently forged critical agreements supporting conservation of wildlife and plant species subject to international trade. From combating wildlife trafficking to protecting iconic and lesser-known species while supporting their sustainable and legal use, the U.S. delegation achieved agreement on a vast array of pressing international wildlife and plant trade and conservation issues.

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Margaret Everson, Principal Deputy Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (right) meets with the Minister of Environment for Angola to discuss combating wildlife crime. Credit: USFWS
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"Northern leopard frogs are an important indicator of water quality," Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife biologist Emily Grabowski says. Credit: Brent Lawrence/USFWS
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One Giant Leap for Northern Leopard Frogs

August 27, 2019

Hundreds of northern leopard frogs hopped into the wild in recent weeks at Columbia National Wildlife Refuge in central Washington. The frogs were released, thanks to a partnership among the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Zoo and Washington State University.

Species Protected as endangered by the State of Washington » »»

"Northern leopard frogs are an important indicator of water quality," Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife biologist Emily Grabowski says. Credit: Brent Lawrence/USFWS
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Running buffalo clover. Credit: USFWS
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Service Proposes to Remove Running Buffalo Clover from List of Endangered Species

August 26, 2019

Once thought extinct, running buffalo clover, a perennial plant native to parts of the eastern United States, is thriving and is now considered recovered. The change in status for the clover came about thanks to a number of state, federal and private conservation partners working together for over three decades. Because of their efforts, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is now proposing to remove Endangered Species Act protections for the species.

News Release »»

Blog: Lost, Found and Now Flourishing in West Virginia »»

Running buffalo clover. Credit: USFWS
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The smooth coneflower flowers from May through July and develops fruits from late June to September. Credit: Caroline S. Krom/USFWS
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Collaboration Gives Endangered Smooth Coneflower an Edge

August 20, 2019

The smooth coneflower, of Virginia, Georgia and the Carolinas, was protected as endangered in 1992, when only 21 populations remained and 39 of the original populations were gone. Today, thanks to a lot of partners and the plant’s adaptability, it is well positioned in its fight to come back.

With Help from Many Partners »»

More photos »»

The smooth coneflower flowers from May through July and develops fruits from late June to September. Credit: Caroline S. Krom/USFWS
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Green-winged teals in flight. Credit: Tom Koerner/USFWS

Service Finalizes 2019-2020 Migratory Bird Hunting Season Frameworks

August 19, 2019

The Service today announced it is finalizing game bird season lengths and bag limits for the 2019-2020 hunting seasons that are largely unchanged from those of last year. The Service is the lead agency charged with managing migratory birds under international treaties and works closely with many partners, including sportsmen’s groups and state agencies.

Bulletin »»

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Green-winged teals in flight. Credit: Tom Koerner/USFWS

A golden eagle flies in Wyoming. Credit: Tom Koerner/USFWS
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Federally Recognized Tribes Can Retain Eagle Remains Found on Their Land

August 13, 2019

Underscoring the agency’s commitment to honoring the wishes of federally recognized Tribes, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced a revised policy regarding the retention of eagle remains on lands within Indian Country. Federally recognized Tribes are now able to retain bald and golden eagle remains found on these lands under certain conditions and with the proper permits.

Service Announces Landmark Revision to Eagle Retention Policy »»

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A golden eagle flies in Wyoming. Credit: Tom Koerner/USFWS
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Federally endangered Bay checkerspot butterfly. Credit: John Cleckler/USFWS
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Trump Administration Improves the Implementing Regulations of the Endangered Species Act

August 12, 2019

In its more than 45-year history, the Endangered Species Act (ESA) has catalyzed countless conservation partnerships that have helped recover some of America’s most treasured animals and plants from the bald eagle to the American alligator. Today, U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt unveiled improvements to the implementing regulations of the ESA designed to increase transparency and effectiveness and bring the administration of the act into the 21st century.

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Federally endangered Bay checkerspot butterfly. Credit: John Cleckler/USFWS
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Why I Took These Shots

August 9, 2019

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service outreach specialist Lisa Hupp took the photo above of a tufted puffin at Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. “Usually I like diffused light rather than full sun for wildlife photos, but the glow of the vibrant orange feet and beak and the contrast with the blue sky made this a fun, colorful image,” she says.

Enjoy and Learn About Other Hupp Photos »»

Native pollinator-friendly plants beneath the elevated end of the solar panels. Credit: Bryan Tompkins/USFWS
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Solar Farms in North Carolina See Benefits to Welcoming Pollinators

August 7, 2019

For solar power companies in North Carolina, one of the biggest expenses is mowing. Most non-native grasses require multiple mowings a month during the growing season and provide little pollinator habitat. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and partners are working with developers to instead use native, pollinator-friendly plants, which, once established, should only be mowed once or twice a year.

One Company Saw Vegetation Maintenance Costs Halved »»

Native pollinator-friendly plants beneath the elevated end of the solar panels. Credit: Bryan Tompkins/USFWS
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The Patapsco River runs free at the former Bloede Dam site in Maryland. Credit: Serena McClain/American Rivers
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Patapsco River Safer, Healthier Without Bloede Dam

August 5, 2019

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is joining hundreds of volunteers this week in the United States, Canada and Mexico for the 2019 International Monarch Monitoring Blitz. By volunteering, you can help monarch experts gain more information to understand the distribution of the migratory monarch butterfly in North America.

Be a Citizen Scientist »»

Learn More About Monarchs »»

2019 International Monarch Monitoring Blitz »»

The Patapsco River runs free at the former Bloede Dam site in Maryland. Credit: Serena McClain/American Rivers
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A monarch caterpillar on common milkweed. Credit: Courtney Celley/USFWS
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Milkweed Monitors Needed for Monarchs

July 30, 2019

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is joining hundreds of volunteers this week in the United States, Canada and Mexico for the 2019 International Monarch Monitoring Blitz. By volunteering, you can help monarch experts gain more information to understand the distribution of the migratory monarch butterfly in North America.

Be a Citizen Scientist »»

Learn More About Monarchs »»

2019 International Monarch Monitoring Blitz »»

A monarch caterpillar on common milkweed. Credit: Courtney Celley/USFWS
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A tri-colored bat at Fern Cave National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Michael Senn/USFWS
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Mapping Species in Alabama’s Teeming Fern Cave

July 29, 2019

Fern Cave, below Fern Cave National Wildlife Refuge, is considered the crown jewel of Alabama caves. Scientists believe the cave is the most biodiverse cavern in the limestone karst region of Alabama, Tennessee and Georgia. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently led a team of scientists and spelunkers into Fern Cave for an all-day bio-blitz to prove the scientists right.

Bats, Glow Worms, Salamanders and More »»

A tri-colored bat at Fern Cave National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Michael Senn/USFWS
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A herd of pronghorn crosses the sagebrush steppe at Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge in Wyoming. Credit: Tom Koerner/USFWS
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Wildlife Corridors

July 24, 2019

National wildlife refuges are vital to connecting and maintaining safe wildlife corridors for birds, fish and mammals. These pathways are increasingly important as our world becomes more developed. 

Safe Path »»

A herd of pronghorn crosses the sagebrush steppe at Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge in Wyoming. Credit: Tom Koerner/USFWS
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During a field visit at Fort McCoy, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks Aurelia Skipwith is shown a Blanding's turtle, a Species of Special Concern in Wisconsin. Credit: Larry Dean/USFWS
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Wisconsin’s Fort McCoy Honored with Military Conservation Partner Award

July 16, 2019

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service values its many partnerships with the military services and appreciates the role of military lands in conserving the nature of America. Last week, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks Aurelia Skipwith presented the Military Conservation Partnership Award to Fort McCoy for excellence in habitat restoration and wildlife management. Fort McCoy recently completed 107 high priority conservation projects, exceeding a 98 percent completion rate.

Fort McCoy Home to Rare Butterflies »»

During a field visit at Fort McCoy, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks Aurelia Skipwith is shown a Blanding's turtle, a Species of Special Concern in Wisconsin. Credit: Larry Dean/USFWS
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Species like the long-billed curlew will benefit from conservation projects funded by the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act. Credit: om Koerner/USFWS
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$20 Million in Funding Throughout the Americas Will Benefit Migratory Birds

July 5, 2019

Every summer, backyards across the United States fill with the color and sound of migratory birds. Many of these birds depend on wintering grounds across the Americas to survive. These long-distance travelers will benefit from $20 million in federal Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act funds and matching funds for 24 collaborative conservation projects in 15 countries. 

News Release »»

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Species like the long-billed curlew will benefit from conservation projects funded by the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act. Credit: om Koerner/USFWS
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