Pinterest
Fall foliage with the word Pinterest in red and the USFWS logo at the top-center.

Pumpkin Carving Stencils

silhouette of Canada goose in flight

Canada Goose. There are several subspecies of the Canada goose. Two of the less common kinds are the giant Canada goose and dusky Canada goose. There are also migratory and non-migratory populations fo the species found across the United States. They tend to graze on land and you may find them on your lawns, fields, parks, and other open spaces, as well as on lakes and ponds. Canada geese can be hunted in some states at specific times of the year.

silhouette of elk antlers and eyes

Elk. Many national wildlife refuges provide excellent habitat for elk. Elk are ungulates, meaning they have hooved feet. They do not require protection under the Endangered Species Act and are a popular game animal. You are most likely to see an elk in late fall, winter, and early spring. Elk and other ungulates around the U.S. are being impacted by chronic wasting disease. Follow local rules and regulations on public lands to help elk and keep their populations healthy.

silhouette of flamingo standing on one let, round sun in top right, water waves at bottom

Flamingo. There are six different kinds of flamingos around the world, and luckily, none of them currently require Endangered Species Act protection. Flamingos are found in South and Central America, Africa, Europe, and Asia. They prefer shallow water and will flock to lakes and lagoons in search of food, especially bodies of water that are too salty for other animals to enjoy. You can help flamingos by getting involved with international conservation groups.

silhouette of grizzly bear

Grizzly Bear. Making their homes in Idaho, Montana, Washington and Wyoming, grizzly bears are among the top predators and most loved wildlife species in North America. They are protected as threatened under the Endangered Species Act and are on the path to recovery thanks to a variety of federal, state, tribal, and non-governmental efforts. Grizzly bears are opportunistic eaters, so stay safe by keeping trash and food locked away when in bear country.

silhouette of growling grizzly bear face

Grizzly Bear. Making their homes in Idaho, Montana, Washington and Wyoming, grizzly bears are among the top predators and most loved wildlife species in North America. They are protected as threatened under the Endangered Species Act and are on the path to recovery thanks to a variety of federal, state, tribal, and non-governmental efforts. Grizzly bears are opportunistic eaters, so stay safe by keeping trash and food locked away when in bear country.

silhouette of loggerhead sea turtle, bubbles in top left, water waves surrounding turtle

Loggerhead Sea Turtle. Loggerheads are the most common species of nesting sea turtle found in the United States. They are protected under the Endangered Species Act as threatened. Loggerheads nest on American beaches during the summer months, so the best way you can help loggerheads is to avoid protected nests and never interfere with baby turtles making their way to water. While males never return to land after hatching, females return to the same beach where they were born to lay their eggs.

silhouette of two manatees surrounded by water waves

Manatee. The gentle West Indian manatee is found in the warm waters of the southeastern United States, Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. They are protected under the Endangered Species Act as threatened and 46 national wildlife refuges provide manatees with good habitat. Recovery efforts have been very successful in increasing manatee populations over the past 25 years. If you encounter a manatee, remember that it is illegal to touch the manatee unless it touches you first!

silhouette of monarch butterfly

Monarch Butterfly. The monarch butterfly is one of the species for which you can make a big impact. Numbers of monarchs have decreased significantly over the last 20 years. Monarchs are important for pollination of our plants and crops, and serve as a symbol of healthy habitats. You can help by planting milkweed plants native to your area (visit our site for more info) and other nectar plants in your garden, and by minimizing use of pesticides.

silhouette of pallid sturgeon

Pallid Sturgeon. The endangered pallid sturgeon is a large fish with a dinosaur-like appearance. It was listed under the Endangered Species Act in 1990 due to habitat degradation, declines in water quality throughout their range and the building of dams that impaired the pallid sturgeon’s ability to migrate to their natural spawning grounds. It can weigh up to 80 pounds and reach 6 feet in length. This fish is a bottom-feeder, and it relies on its whisker-like to barbells to detect food hiding along the river bottom

silhouette of pronghorn head

Pronghorn Antelope. Traveling at speeds of up to 60 miles per hour across the American West’s sagebrush sea, pronghorn are the fastest land mammal in North America. They may not be very creepy but they are “crepuscular,” meaning that they are most active at dawn and dusk. Pronghorn do not require Endangered Species Act protections, are actively managed by state wildlife agencies, and have a designated hunting season in most states where they are found.

silhouette of pronghorn head and chest

Pronghorn Antelope. Traveling at speeds of up to 60 miles per hour across the American West’s sagebrush sea, pronghorn are the fastest land mammal in North America. They may not be very creepy but they are “crepuscular,” meaning that they are most active at dawn and dusk. Pronghorn do not require Endangered Species Act protections, are actively managed by state wildlife agencies, and have a designated hunting season in most states where they are found.

silhouette of pumpkinseed fish

Pumpkinseed Fish. The pumpkinseed fish is in the sunfish family, and lives in freshwater. It is a popular fish for young anglers because it is easy to catch and will bite at almost anything. You could be fishing in just three easy steps:

silhouette of trout jumping out of water

Trout. There are four major trout species in the United States: rainbow, brook, cutthroat and brown. Trout are a popular fish among anglers due to abundance, they are fun to catch, and they taste pretty darn good too! You could be fishing in just three easy steps:

silhouette of a wolf, crescent moon in top right, stars in top left, and water across bottom

Gray Wolf. Once nearly erased from the American landscape due to persecution by humans, the gray wolf has made a comeback and roams across nine states. After receiving protection under the Endangered Species Act, years of collaborative conservation work by the Service, states, tribes, conservation organizations and private landowners were successful in recovering the wolf, and it is now proposed for delisting. You can help wolves by supporting the conservation efforts of people who live alongside wolves.

silhouette of Northern long-eared bat face

Northern Long-Eared Bat. Native to 37 states in the eastern and north central U.S., the northern long-eared bat is a special creature that assists humans with pest management and pollination. It is protected as threatened under the Endangered Species Act and it is one of the species most susceptible to the deadly bat disease, white-nose syndrome. You can help conserve bats by: complying with cave restrictions and closures; installing a bat box; or leaving dead trees standing on your property to allow bats to roost.


Coloring Pages!

Line drawing of a belted kingfisher. Top center text says belted kingfisher.

Belted kingfisher

Line drawing of a green-winged teal. Top center text says green-winged teal.

Green-winged teal

Line drawing of a painted bunting. Top center text says painted bunting

Painted bunting

Line drawing of a roseate spoonbill. Top center text says roseate spoonbill.

Roseate spoonbill

Line drawing of a royal tern. Top center text says royal tern.

Royal tern

Line drawing of a ruby-throated hummingbird. Top center text says ruby-throated hummingbird.

Ruby-throated hummingbird

Line drawing of a sandhill crane. Top center text says sandhill crane.

Sandhill crane

Line drawing of a turkey vulture. Top center text says turkey vulture.

Turkey vulture

Line drawing of an upland sandpiper. Top center text says upland sandpiper..

Upland sandpiper

 Line drawing of a wood duck. Top center text says wood duck.

Wood duck

Line drawing of a wood thrush. Top center text says wood thrush.

Wood thrush

Line drawing of a yellow warbler. Top center text says yellow warbler.

Yellow warbler

  Line drawing of a black-footed ferret surrounded by flowers. Center text says endangered species day.

Endangered Species Day!

Draw a Bird!

A drawing of a burrowing owl standing in grass. The words Burrowing Owl appear in white against a blue banner along the top and the USFWS logo appears in the top-right corner.

Burrowing owl

A black and white drawing of a cedar waxwing bird perched on a tree limb that has small berries. The words Cedar Waxwing appear in white against a blue banner along the top and the USFWS logo appears in the top-right corner.

Cedar waxwing

A black and white drawing of a greater sage-grouse bird standing in grass. The words Greater Sage-Grouse appear in white against a blue banner along the top and the USFWS logo appears in the top-right corner.

Great Sage-grouse

A black and white drawing of a pileated woodpecker perched on the wide of a tree with its head tilted back as if ready to strike the tree. The words Pileated Woodpecker appear in white against a blue banner along the top and the USFWS logo appears in the top-right corner.

Pileated woodpecker

A black and white drawing of a spoonbill bird perched on a tree branch with its large wings spread wide as if ready to take off. The word Spoonbill appears in white against a blue banner along the top and the USFWS logo appears in the top-right corner.

Spoonbill

A black and white drawing of a wood duck swimming in water with its wings up above the water. The words Wood Duck appear in white against a blue banner along the top and the USFWS logo appears in the top-right corner.

Wood duck

Valentine's Day Cards

A skunk with a various pink hearts emerging from under tail. Top text says, Valentine's Day can stink. Center text says, To and From

Skunk. Valentine's Day Stinks Valentine's Day card

Vintage photo of a woman looking a fish at the end of her fishing rod while surrounded by pink and red hearts. Text says, You're a Catch!

Historic photo courtesy of the University of Washington’s Freshwater and Marine Image Bank

Badger holding four roses while walking on grass. Top text says, Sorry to badger you, but I just wanted to say. Center text says, To and From. Bottom text says, Happy Valentine's Day.

Badger . A Badgering Valentine's Day card

Belted kingfisher wearing a crown while perched on metal pole and surrounded by red hearts. Top text says, You might be single and solitary. Center text says, But you're still a king...fisher. Bottom text says, To and From.

Kingfisher. Valentine's Day card for the single king in your life

Bull moose looking backwards with two pink hearts near head. Top left text says, To my valentine with a white heart behind it. Top right text says, To and From. Bottom text says, You amoose me.

Moose. An AMOOSING Valentine's Day card

Two otters nuzzling noses and surrounded by pink hearts. Top text says, Happy Valentine's Day. Center text says, You're otterly amazing. Bottom text says, To and From.

Otter . An otterly amazing Valentine's Day card

Several bees and a queen bee wearing a crown on honeycomb. Top left text says, Love can sting. Center text says, But no matter what, you'll always be a queen. Bottom text says, To and From.

Queen Bee. A Valentine's Card for the single queen bee in your life

Five different sole fish. Top left fish says, Get it? Bottom left fish says, kissy face emoji. Center fish has hearts near mouth. Top right fish says, LOL! Bottom right fish says, Besties! Top text says, Happy Palentine's Day to my sole mates.

Sole. Historic illustration courtesy of the Biodiversity Heritage Library

Sturgeon wearing a stethoscope. Top text says, Call a sturgeon. Bottom text says, Because you're a heartbreaker with a red heart and heartbeat wave.

Sturgeon. Historic illustration courtesy of the Biodiversity Heritage Library

Vintage photo of a man holding a large bass. Top text says, Nice bass! Bottom text says, Happy Valentine's Day to my favorite angler.

Bass. Historic photo courtesy of the University of Washington’s Freshwater and Marine Image Bank.