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Conservation in a Changing Climate
 

Get Involved


Volunteer with the Service

USA National Phenology Network

 

 

 

Get Involved

Children learn how to remove young trees from buckets for planting in their schoolyard. Credit: Lavonda Walton/USFWS.
Children learn how to remove young trees from buckets for planting in their schoolyard. Credit: Lavonda Walton/USFWS

Small changes in our everyday lives can make a big difference for current and future generations of Americans. Here are a few ways you can help mitigate the effects of climate change and support wildlife conservation where you live*:

Green Your Own World:

  • Plant native trees and shrubs that absorb carbon dioxide and slow the spread of invasive species and consider planting a pollinator garden, which does extra duty by providing nectar and pollen for pollinators such as butterflies, hummingbirds, beetles and bees.
  • Recycle paper, plastics, and glass.
  • Bring your own re-usable bags to the store and cut down on plastic waste.
  • Purchase recycled products that require less energy to manufacture.
  • Change to energy-efficient light bulbs and appliances.
  • Turn off lights, TVs, computers and other electronics when you do not need them.
  • Set a “2 degrees” goal and program your thermostat a couple of degrees up (A/C) or down (heat) than you would typically set it to reduce energy use.
  • Reduce gasoline consumption – combine multiple trips, carpool, walk or bike whenever you can.

Volunteer:

  • Give your time and energy to support a national wildlife refuge, national fish hatchery or in your own community, such as helping on a clean-up or restoring habitat*.
  • Sign up to be a citizen scientist and encourage your family and friends to join you. Opportunities abound – like the National Phenology Network Nature’s Notebook project or Budburst - where you can become part of nationwide efforts to gather data on plants and wildlife that researchers can then use to better understand changes happening in the environment.

Learn and Engage:

  • Teach the next generation about the importance of natural resources by taking them outside. Your yard or a nearby park is one place to start, or plan a visit to a national wildlife refuge, national fish hatchery or other federal, state or local protected land.
  • Talk to your neighbors, civic associations, local service groups to engage them in discussions and action.
  • Read: Online and local libraries are filled with information. There are great books for young audiences on the subject of climate change.
*For the latest FWS coronavirus (COVID-19) info, check our update. Please recreate responsibly.

 

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