Home
Field Notes
 
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Field Notes Entry   
St. Louis Area Refuges Participate in 2015 St. Louis Earth Day
Midwest Region, April 28, 2015
Print Friendly Version
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees John Hartleb (left) and Lisa Dlugolecki (right) shared information with Earth Day visitors.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees John Hartleb (left) and Lisa Dlugolecki (right) shared information with Earth Day visitors. - Photo Credit: USFWS
Katie Dreas (left) and Cortney Solum (right) help Earth Day visitors create balls of seed to add native plants to their home or neighborhood gardens.
Katie Dreas (left) and Cortney Solum (right) help Earth Day visitors create balls of seed to add native plants to their home or neighborhood gardens. - Photo Credit: USFWS

The St. Louis area urban wildlife refuges participated in the 2015 St. Louis Earth Day on April 26, 2015. 

Visitors enjoyed learning about local national wildlife refuges and the work being done to preserve and restore habitat for wildlife, as well as how they can visit a national wildlife refuge.

Both kids and adults got their hands dirty to create “seed balls” for pollinators. These balls of future habitat were made of soil, native seed and clay. Participants then took their creation home to place in their garden or neighborhood with the intention of making their place more inviting for bees and butterflies.

Visitors were enthusiastic about monarch butterflies and were eager to help the butterfly in their backyard. U.S Fish and Wildlife Service staff invited interested individuals to become citizen scientists to help the butterfly. Two Rivers National Wildlife Refuge will hold a citizen science training program following Earth Day on May 2.

Earth Day organizers boast the St. Louis event ranks the second largest Earth Day celebration in the nation. St. Louis Public Radio reported that the 2015 event attracted more than 50,000 people to learn about environmental issues, green businesses and organizations and projects that promote sustainable lifestyles.

An Earth Day Challenge encouraged attendees to bring their own water bottle and shopping bag and use low-impact transportation to attend the festival. The event also modeled reducing household waste by recycling and composting more than 90% of waste collected at the festival.

The refuges are working together as part of the Urban Wildlife Refuge Program. Other projects in the St. Louis area partnership include supporting the city’s Milkweeds for Monarchs program through environmental education, participation in a YMCA day camp, and assisting in the improvement of a city park to provide native habitat and a place for residents to enjoy the outdoors.


Contact Info: Cortney Solum, 618-883-2524, cortney_solum@fws.gov
Find a Field Notes Entry

Search by keyword

Search by State




Search by Region


US Fish and Wildlife Service footer