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LODI FWO: Green Footprint Festival Outreach Event 2017
California-Nevada Offices , June 8, 2017
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Biological Science Technician Emma Davison was the resident tattoo artist and sported the trout
Biological Science Technician Emma Davison was the resident tattoo artist and sported the trout - Photo Credit: USFWS
Phil Voong and Heather Benedict, Biological Science Technician’s with the service,  helped construct the hats and bracelets.
Phil Voong and Heather Benedict, Biological Science Technician’s with the service, helped construct the hats and bracelets. - Photo Credit: USFWS

By Heather Benedict

On Thursday June 8th, 2017 representatives from the Delta Juvenile Fish Monitoring Program of the Fish and Wildlife Service, Lodi office participated in the annual Green Footprint Festival in Pittsburg, CA. This event was held at the Small World Park and is scheduled to coincide with the local schools summer break.

The area is typically bright, sunny and hot for the event but the temperature was mild, with overcast skies and a bit of rain. Despite lower numbers than generally anticipated, mostly likely due to the weather, the participants and visitors were in a jovial mood and were enthusiastic to partake in various activities and events throughout the grounds. The possibilities for entertainment and education ranged from live snakes and eco-themed juggling act to dioramas demonstrating pollutants and their entry points into the water ways.

At the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s tent the focus was on salmonids life cycles. Examples of salmon and their various phases of development from eggs to fry were a favorite, as well as the specimens of North American fish that could be seen up close and personal. Classics such as face painting were updated to temporary tattoos of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service logo stating “It’s cool to care about Fish and Wildlife!” spreading generally by word of hand, which was where most of the tattoos were placed.
These rebels with a cause also were able to color and make hats for their favorite species of trout and finish their new look with a salmon egg bracelet to wear the full circle of life. Many of the young participants listed Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) subjects to be their favorite of the last school year and a large number attributed it to the STEM teacher being their favorite. Hopefully this trend continues and cultivates a responsible and conscientious wave of engineers with new solutions for shared use of water for people and fish in the future.

 


Heather Benedict is a Biological Science Technician at the U.S. Fish and wildlife office in Lodi, CA


Contact Info: Jerrica Lewis, 209-334-2968 ext 338, Jerrica_Lewis@fws.gov
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