Home
Field Notes
 
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Field Notes Entry   
The Hunt for Eurasian Ruffe
Midwest Region, September 27, 2011
Print Friendly Version
Biologist Kowalski releases a salmon, after removing an sea lamprey, while electrofishing for Eurasian Ruffe.
Biologist Kowalski releases a salmon, after removing an sea lamprey, while electrofishing for Eurasian Ruffe. - Photo Credit: Joseph Gerbyshak

Eurasian ruffe were introduced to the Great Lakes, like many exotic invaders, via the ballast water from ocean-going vessels. Ruffe, which are in the family perchidae, have a similar diet and feeding habits to other fish in that family leading to less food for native perchids. This can cause a decline in the population of native perchids and eventually be problematic for the Great Lakes’ food web. Early detection and tracking of the ruffe population are important for understanding the dynamics of the Great Lakes’ food web and ultimately the proper management of the fishery.

 

The Sea Lamprey Control Program reported a ruffe was caught in a trap located in the Trout River, north of Rogers City, MI. This prompted the Alpena FWCO staff to try and locate this exotic invader. During the week of September 12th, Fish Biologists Joseph Gerbyshak and Adam Kowalski set out to try and confirm the presence of ruffe in the Trout River and several other watersheds in close proximity to the Trout River. Trap nets and electrofishing were used to sample fish communities in the Trout, Swan and Thunder Bay Rivers. Fortunately, no ruffe were detected. Nevertheless, yearly monitoring will continue to occur in Lake Huron and its tributaries for the presence of ruffe and other exotic species.


Contact Info: Joseph Gerbyshak, 989-356-5102 ext. 1015, joseph_gerbyshak@fws.gov
Find a Field Notes Entry

Search by keyword

Search by State




Search by Region


US Fish and Wildlife Service footer