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Stewardship in the spring
Midwest Region, February 28, 2018
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Landowners Steve Thompson and Mike Balch installing a Kestrel box as part of the American Kestrel Partnership. Monitoring the box is part of a national citizen science project.
Landowners Steve Thompson and Mike Balch installing a Kestrel box as part of the American Kestrel Partnership. Monitoring the box is part of a national citizen science project. - Photo Credit: Kurt Waterstradt

 

Stewardship in the spring

Conservation of our natural resources and land stewardship are infectious in spring, especially after a long Wisconsin winter! Our Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program participant Steve Thompson is interested in all aspects of wildlife that utilize his retired dairy farm, which is nestled in the hills and valleys of Southwest Wisconsin’s Driftless Area. Steve’s passion for wildlife spills over to his neighbors as well. Recently, he and his neighbor, Mike Balch, installed four American kestrel boxes on their two farms as part of the American Kestrel Partnership in Wisconsin. American kestrel populations are experiencing long-term declines in North America. In Wisconsin, Breeding Bird Survey data for 1999-2009 show an annual decline of 6.3%. The causes are unknown, largely because of insufficient data, highlighting the need to generate data, models and conservation strategies at a continent-wide scale.

The American Kestrel Partnership is an international research network designed to generate data, models and conservation plans for kestrel habitat and populations at large spatial scales. Our partnership with Thompson, unites the data-generating capacity of citizen scientists with the data-analysis expertise of professional scientists by promoting research collaboration among citizen scientists, universities, government agencies, conservation organizations, schools and businesses. Steve’s conservation ethic and interest in prairie, oak savanna and wetland habitat restoration contributes to our Nation’s wildlife resources ensuring viable wildlife populations for all to appreciate.

To learn more visit the Peregrine Fund website.

 

 


Contact Info: Kurt Waterstradt, 608-221-1206, ext. 14, kurt_waterstradt@fws.gov
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