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US Fish & Wildlife Service FieldNotes

Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Herring Gull Eggs from Colony Sites in the United States Areas of the Laurentian Great Lakes

Region 3, November 13, 2014
Herring gull eggs, St. Mary's River, MI.
Herring gull eggs, St. Mary's River, MI. - Photo Credit: n/a

Jeremy N. Moore and Dr. Lisa Williams, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service East Lansing Field Office Contaminant Specialists, were co-authors of a presentation titled, “Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Herring Gull Eggs from Colony Sites in the United States Areas of the Laurentian Great Lakes,” presented at the 35th annual meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry North America. The study was presented by fellow co-author Guanyong Su of Environment Canada and Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Additional co-authors were Robert Letcher, Environment Canada and Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Pam Martin, Environment Canada, Burlington, Ontario, Canada; and William Bowerman, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. The objectives of the study are to contribute to the binational coordination of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement for contaminants of emerging concern (known as CECs) monitoring within both Canada and U.S. water of the Great Lakes, address potentially key persistent organic pollutants and CECs that may be contributing to animal deformities or reproductive problems and beneficial use impairment in Areas of Concern, and compare the determined herring gull egg CEC concentrations in the present study to lowest observed effect concentrations  previously determined by laboratory model avian species. At current contamination levels, adverse effects are not predicted for most of the examined CECs, with the exception of several polybrominated diphenyl ethers, some poly-flouroalkyl substances and hexabromocyclododecane, concentrations of which are at comparable levels to their reported LOEC values based on model avian species. Results from this study will contribute to the analysis of contaminants of emerging concerns upon Great Lakes colonial water bird survival, reproduction and immune suppression. This study was funded by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative via the Midwest Region U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Contact Info: Jeremy Moore, 517-351-8318, jeremy_n_moore@fws.gov