Endangered Species
Ecological Services

Partnership Stories Archived: 2017

The Ecological Services Program works formally and informally with a large variety of groups and individuals to further species conservation. Partnerships for protecting and recovering endangered and threatened species have been established between the Ecological Services Program and other U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service programs, other federal agencies, state governments, private landowners, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and American Indian tribes.



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Posted
6/13/17

Hawaiian yellow-faced Bee Project (1:55)

Partners: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources and the University of Hawaii at Manoa

Yellow-faced bee. Credit: USFWS
Overview: This video documents the ongoing efforts of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Pacific Office Coastal Programs and partners to undertake necessary research to conserve and protect the Hawaiian yellow-faced bee.

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Posted
5/15/17

TN Natural Areas Bladderpod Conservation Project (6:23)

Partners: Tennessee Division of Natural Areas, Tennessee Department of Environmental Conservation, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and Army Corps of Engineers

Spring Creek bladderpod. Credit:  Geoff Call,USFWS
Overview: Tennessee Division of Natural Areas along with their partners are working to conserve and protect two species of bladderpod—the Spring Creek bladderpod, a federally endangered species, and the Stones Creek bladderpod.

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Posted
3/27/17

Outdoor Nevada | Moapa Dace (6:02)

Partners: Nevada Department of Wildlife, Southern Nevada Water Authority, and others

Moapa dace. Credit: USFWS

Status: Endangered / Listed March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Moapa coriacea
Overview: The Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge in Nevada supports and protects a healthy, thriving population of Moapa dace at the headwaters of the Muddy River. Stable flows from the refuge's numerous warm springs fill meandering channels downstream that provide ideal habitat for dace, as well as Virgin River chub and other species of endemic fish and invertebrates.

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Posted
3/10/17

Grassland Conservation: Protecting our Legacy (21:30)

Partners: Bureau of Land Management, New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management, Devon Energy, and many others

lesser-prairie chicken. Credit: USFWS
Overview: In the southern Great Plains of southeastern New Mexico, both the lesser-prairie chicken and dunes sagebrush lizard were in decline. In the event that either animal was listed as an endangered species, federal and state agencies, the oil and gas industry, ranchers, conservation organizations, and private landowners worked together to develop a plan so they could continue their operations.

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Posted
3/08/17

Oak Habitat Restoration Partnership (11:20)

Partners: Lomakatsi Restoration Project, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Klamath Bird Observatory, and many others

Ashland, Oregon. Credit: USFWS
Overview: A diverse group of partners are working together to protect and promote development of oak habitat in Oregon and California for the benefit of endangered and threatened plants, migratory birds, and other wildlife.

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Posted
3/07/17

Sonoran Pronghorn Recovery (6:29)

Partners: Arizona Game and Fish, Bureau of Land Management, Department of Defense, and others

Sonoran pronghorn. Credit: USFWS

Status: Endangered / Listed March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Antilocapra americana sonoriensis
Overview: A geographically and genetically distinct sub-species of pronghorn, the Sonoran pronghorn is smaller and lighter in color and is adapted for survival in desert conditions. The males weigh up to 130 pounds and females up to 110 pounds Pronghorn are slightly smaller than a white-tailed deer with a shoulder-height of about three feet.

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Posted
3/06/17

Restoring North America's Rarest Trout (1:55)

Partner: California Department of Fish and Wildlife, U.S. Forest Service, and others

Paiute cutthroat trout. Credit: Dan Hottle/USFWS

Status: Endangered / Listed March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Oncorhynchus clarkii seleniris
Overview: Fish biologists from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service and California Department of Fish and Wildlife are one step closer to restoring the Paiute cutthroat trout back to it's historical range. The Paiute cutthroat is the rarest trout in North America and lives only in an 11-mile stretch of Silver King Creek in Alpine County, California.

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Last updated: January 16, 2018