Endangered Species
Ecological Services

Partnership Stories Archived: 2015

The Ecological Services Program works formally and informally with a large variety of groups and individuals to further species conservation. Partnerships for protecting and recovering endangered and threatened species have been established between the Ecological Services Program and other U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service programs, other federal agencies, state governments, private landowners, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and American Indian tribes.



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Posted
12/31/15

An Update on the Endangered Mount Graham Red Squirrel (7:36)

Partners: U.S. Forest Service, Arizona Game and Fish, Phoenix Zoo

Whooping crane. Credit: Joel Trick/USFWS.
Status: Endangered / Listed June 3, 1987
Scientific Name: Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamensis
Overview: Mild winters and multiple insect infestations have significantly affected the spruce-fir forest habitat of Arizona's Pinaleno Mountains— the only place the endangered Mount Graham red squirrel occurs. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service scientists, along with state wildlife agency and U.S. Forest Service partners, are working with the Phoenix Zoo to develop a pilot breeding program to help the species rebound.

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Posted
10/09/15

Whooping Crane Research (2:19)

Partner: North Dakota Game and Fish and Texas Wildlife and Parks

Whooping crane. Credit: Joel Trick/USFWS.
Status: Endangered / Listed March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Grus americana
Overview: Whooping cranes migrate through North Dakota each year. With only around 300 individuals left in the wild, research on these animals is critical for protecting this endangered species. Dave Brant talks about a trapping project in Texas that is helping with the study of these birds.

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Posted
09/17/15

California Drought: Protecting Salmon (4:56)

Partners: NOAA Fisheries

Chinook salmon. Credit: Dan Cox/USFWS.
Overview: NOAA Fisheries, the California Department of Fish & Wildlife, water control agencies and private landowners come together to find ways to ration water for endangered salmon survival during the California drought.

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Posted
09/02/15

Saving Endangered Native Hawiian Plants One Seed at a Time (2:45)

Partners: University of Hawaii and Lyon Arboretum

Hawaiian Rare Plant Program. Credit: USFWS.
Overview: Deep in the heart of Manoa Valley resides the largest collection of Native Hawaiian seeds in the world, and one of the only places where you can find some of Hawaii's rarest native plant species.

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Posted
06/26/15

Sonoran Tiger Salamander (10:45)

Partners: Arizona Fish and Game

Sonoran tiger salamander. Credit: USFWS.
Status: Endangered / Listed January 06, 1997
Scientific Name: Ambystoma tigrinum stebbinsi
Overview: The Sonoran tiger salamander lives only in a small part of southern Arizona and northern Mexico. While it resembles a lizard, the Sonoran tiger salamander is actually an amphibian, part of a group of animals that were around even before dinosaurs. Their survival is threatened by disease outbreaks, limited habitat, and the introduction of fish, bullfrogs, crayfish and other tiger salamander species that are not native to Arizona.

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Posted
05/28/15

Jaguars Are Returning to Southern Arizona (07:54)

Partners: Arizona Fish and Game and University of Arizona College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Jaguar. Credit: USFWS.
Status: Endangered / Listed March 28, 1972
Scientific Name: Panthera onca
Overview: All wild cats are important to ecosystem functioning because they are apex predators and therefore impact the entire food chain. In Southern Arizona, the top predator is the mountain lion, but over the last 15 years, solitary male jaguars, typically one at any given time, have migrated from Northern Mexico into Southern Arizona and New Mexico.

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Posted
04/29/15

Endangered Hawaiian Birds Get Second Chance (01:50)

Partners: San Diego Zoo Global

Vaquita. Credit: Paula Olson, NOAA Contractor.
Overview: Two species of Hawaiian honeycreeper – 'akikiki and 'akeke'e – are in danger of becoming extinct. These tiny birds live in the forest canopy and survive on nectar from tropical flowers. Scientists at the San Diego Zoo have started a captive breeding program to help brink these species back from the brink.

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Posted
04/06/15

Vaquita | Saving the Desert Porpoise (09:12)

Partners: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Government of Mexico, World Wildlife Fund (Mexico) and others

Vaquita. Credit: Paula Olson, NOAA Contractor.
Status: Endangered / Listed January 9, 1985
Scientific Name: Phocoena sinus
Overview: Vaquitas, also known as the "Gulf of California porpoise" or "Cochito," are elusive and timid members of the porpoise family. They were first described by western scientists in 1958 based on several skulls. This species is the smallest known cetacean. These porpoises reach about four to five feet in length and weigh 65 to 120 pounds. Females are generally slightly larger than males.
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Posted
03/04/15

Protecting Grand Canyon's Endangered Humpback Chub (10:08)

Partners: Arizona Game and Fish, National Park Service, and others

Humbpack chub. Credit: USFWS
Status: Endangered / Listed March 11, 1967
Scientific Name: Gila cypha
Overview: The Colorado River Basin supports one of the most distinctive fish communities in North America, including the federally endangered humpback chub. One of only six remaining populations of this fish is found in Grand Canyon, Arizona.
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Posted
02/18/15

Arizona's Endangered Mexican Wolves (10:55)

Partners: Arizona Game and Fish, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the White Mountain Apache Tribe

Mexican wolf. Credit: Jim Clark, USFWS
Status: Endangered / Listed April 28, 1976
Scientific Name: Canis lupus baileyi
Overview: The Mexican wolf is the rarest subspecies of gray wolf in North America. Once common throughout portions of the southwestern United States, the Mexican wolf was all but eliminated from the wild by the 1970s. In 1977, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service initiated efforts to conserve the species. In 1998, Mexican wolves were released to the wild for the first time in the Blue Range Wolf Recovery Area. Missing from the landscape for more than 30 years, the howl of the Mexican wolf can once again be heard in the mountains of the southwestern U.S.
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Posted
02/05/15

Yellowstone Grizzly Bears: A Success Story (9:02)

Partners: Wyoming Game and Fish Department, Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee and others

Grizzly bear. Credit: USFWS
Status: Threatened / Listed July 28, 1975
Scientific Name: Ursus arctos horribilis
Overview: When Lewis and Clark explored the West in the early 1800s an estimated 50,000 grizzly bears roamed between the Pacific Ocean and the Great Plains, across vast stretches of open and unpopulated land. But when pioneers moved in, bears were persecuted and their numbers and range drastically declined. As European settlement expanded over the next hundred years , towns and cities sprung up, and habitat for these large omnivores – along with their numbers – shrunk drastically. Today, with the western United States inhabited by millions of Americans, only a few small corners of grizzly country remains, supporting about 1,400 to 1,700 wild grizzly bears. Of the 37 separate grizzly populations present in 1922, 31 were extirpated by 1975.
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Last updated: January 16, 2018