Service employees inspire others with a Sense of Wonder

Akimi King releasing a tagged monarch butterfly. Credit: USFWS

Akimi King releasing a tagged monarch butterfly. Credit: USFWS


By Pam Bierce
September 13, 2019

Klamath Falls Fish and Wildlife biologist Akimi King has won the 2019 Pacific Southwest Region's Sense of Wonder Award. King was recognized for her long-term work with the Connecting People with Nature initiative, her high quality environmental education programming, and her efforts to educate local communities throughout the Klamath Basin about pollinators, especially monarch butterfly conservation.

The Sense of Wonder Recognition Program recognizes a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employee who has designed, implemented or shown visionary leadership in an interpretive or environmental education program that fosters a sense of wonder and enhances public stewardship of our wildlife heritage.

As the Regional winner, King will attend the National Association of Interpretation annual conference in Denver this November, where one person from among all the regions' nominees will be selected as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Sense of Wonder Award winner.

Congratulations to each of our 2019 nominees for your excellence in the field of environmental education and interpretation. We are proud of you all!

Michael Glenn with student. Credit: USFWS

Michael Glenn with student. Credit: USFWS

Michael Glenn is a leader in our region for connecting people with nature, especially through his schoolyard habitat work and through the Condor Kids programs. Glenn has built a broad coalition of collaborators around Ventura and even into the Los Angeles basin, bringing youth to the outdoors and inspiring that sense of wonder.

Chantel Jimenez giving a group tour. Credit: Lisa Cox//USFWS

Chantel Jimenez giving a group tour. Credit: Lisa Cox/USFWS

Chantel Jimenez was nominated for her leadership in building and managing partnerships across all of southern California as part of the SoCal Urban Wildlife Refuge Project. Through outdoor learning, stewardship of natural habitats, conservation-based work for urban young adults, and the simple enjoyment of being outside in nature, she is building an urban constituency that supports the mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Wildlife Refuge System.

Genie Moore. Credit: USFWS

Genie Moore. Credit: USFWS

Genie Moore has shared her sense of wonder with countless students, interns, volunteers, Service colleagues and partners since 1997 when she first joined the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay NWR. Moore’s ongoing efforts in the communities of Alviso, San Jose and beyond are building a connected conservation constituency in some of the most populated areas of the country. For over 20 years, Moore has help create interactive ways to discuss the challenges and opportunities facing our ecosystem.

 

About the writer: Pam Bierce handles media relations in the Pacific Southwest Region's external affairs office, located in Sacramento, California.